843-764-3333
7629 Sandlapper Parkway N. Charleston, SC 29420

kitchen countertopsIn Summerville, SC

Let's Talk!

We offer a wide selection of stones and materials for your next kitchen renovation project:

Kitchen Remodeling Summerville, SC

Granite

 Bathroom Renovation Summerville, SC

Marble

 Flooring Summerville, SC

Quartzite

 Hardwood Flooring Summerville, SC

Recycle Glass

 Home Renovations Summerville, SC

Quartz

If you're in need of a professional, fast, reliable company for kitchen cabinets, countertops, and remodels, look no further than Stone City Kitchen & Bath.

RM

What Clients Say About Us

Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

Heading Tag

When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Summerville, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

Heading Tag

Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-764-3333

Free Consultation

Latest News in Summerville, SC

Summerville backtracks on plan for paid parking at city garage

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Summerville town leaders have decided to keep parking at the city parking garage free, at least for now.Many residents spoke out against a plan to change the free garage into a pay-to-park facility when they learned town leaders were considering that option.“We were really worrying that our customers wouldn’t come, and they wouldn’t feel as welcome to come,” Hanebrink Jewelers manager Alicia Suarez said.Summerville Town Councilman Russ Touchberry said there were repairs ...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Summerville town leaders have decided to keep parking at the city parking garage free, at least for now.

Many residents spoke out against a plan to change the free garage into a pay-to-park facility when they learned town leaders were considering that option.

“We were really worrying that our customers wouldn’t come, and they wouldn’t feel as welcome to come,” Hanebrink Jewelers manager Alicia Suarez said.

Summerville Town Councilman Russ Touchberry said there were repairs that needed to be done to the garage and they needed to figure out how to fund that. Many options were discussed and paying for parking was one of those options.

The community has come out to several different sessions to share their thoughts. At one of them, Touchberry said he took two pages of notes. He said it was “fantastic” to hear from business owners and citizens who use the parking garage.

“The heart of town right here, the businesses are thriving, they’re doing very well, they’ve rebounded from covid,” Touchberry said. “We have new investment, new restaurants, new shops, and all of the concerns expressed that this may, paying for parking, charging for parking in our parking garage, could disrupt the momentum. And we did not want to disrupt the momentum.”

Diane Frankenberger is the owner of People, Places, and Quilts, which has been open for 33 years. She says although there’s room for parking improvements in the town, she’s grateful that the downtown area is booming because she says it hasn’t always been that way.

“Right now, we’ve got a parking problem, and if they started to charge for it, it would just make it worse,” Frankenberger said.

Some are now thanking the Town for listening to their concerns.

Katie Marodis is the shopkeeper at Everything Chic. When she heard that their customers might have to pay to park, she said it was distressing. Now, she says she’s delighted that their voices were heard.

“Listen to the voice of the people, those who are speaking the loudest,” Marodis said. “The merchants are very important to the climate of the town, and what people love, especially this area right here in the downtown.”

While parking will remain free for now, Touchberry said he doesn’t want to make any guarantees for the future.

Touchberry said Mayor Ricky Waring told him he would not put the item on the council agenda. Touchberry doesn’t anticipate another council member will, but if they do, he doesn’t believe it would have any support across the board.

Touchberry encourages all citizens to continue to approach Summerville officials with feedback.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Summerville community plagued by past flooding worries about impacts of Hurricane Ian

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCIV) — It remains to be seen exactly what Ian will bring our way this weekend, but residents of a Summerville community are worried about potenti...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCIV) — It remains to be seen exactly what Ian will bring our way this weekend, but residents of a Summerville community are worried about potential flooding after a history of problems in the past.

ABC News 4’s Sean Mahoney reported on this area near main street exactly a year ago where residents like Todd Hubbard claimed the drainage system in the city was dangerously worn out.

He said after just a small rainstorm in his backyard is turned into a swimming pool and he is worried about what could come with Hurricane Ian on the horizon

Hubbard’s home is on a six-foot decline from main street in district two of Summerville, which causes the water to rush down at high speeds.

Hubbard says it has gotten so bad he took out a flood policy even though it is not in a flood zone. he says the city has been slow in responding to his requests for solutions over the past year and is worried about the impact Ian could have

“It makes me nervous, you know, having almost flooded before the water has literally been within an inch of my doorstep,” Hubbard said, “You know, so a storm of this size. They're saying it's it'll be slow moving. Yeah, it concerns me, you know, because not all the drains going up the hill are adequately taking in water.”

Hubbard did say the city has installed open drain systems around his neighborhood since our story last year, however he says at times the water has backed up from those drains and went into his backyard.

We reached out to the town of Summerville for a response about Hubbard’s specific property and they did say they are working on a plan to possibly raise the main drain in his neighborhood to allow more water to come in and prevent blockages.

They have taken preventative measures in major parts of the city to fix their drainage systems, such as raising drain outlets and working to update full system, but town officials say their hands can be tied when it comes to making major changes.

Town Administrator Russ Cornette said many of these drainage systems go under houses and they don’t have the easement (or right) to be able to go into someone’s land to make major changes to drainage systems.

Cornette said they've been helping with flooding on private property, but they say this is just a courtesy.

He says the city does the best they can to install ditches and open drains to try and relieve some of the excess water in big rainfalls but just some areas, just by the geography of the town, will naturally get it worse.

“There's certain there's areas in town as his portfolio falling, the flooding and other areas of low lying areas obviously going to collect more water than areas on top of ridges and hills and we address those in best we can make sure they're free and clear,” Cornette said.

Cornette did say the city has been preparing for Ian over the past couple of days by visiting several “high risk” areas to see if drainage pipes are not clogged and there are not debris in ditches which could cause overflow.

Cornette also asks residents who live near a ditch or “organic structure” to make sure there is no debris blocking possible paths of water and if there is a problem to call the town.

Summerville veterans remember

In any gathering of veterans, there is always an awareness of those no longer here and what is still present and accounted for in those who are.Thirty-four veterans from four branches of service and their loved ones gathered Friday at Summerville Estates for a commemorative luncheon and the traditional “White Table” ceremony. Celebrating their pride in service and the opportunities they found during their military careers, they also acknowledged a survivor’s grief for the fallen, the missing and the families still wa...

In any gathering of veterans, there is always an awareness of those no longer here and what is still present and accounted for in those who are.

Thirty-four veterans from four branches of service and their loved ones gathered Friday at Summerville Estates for a commemorative luncheon and the traditional “White Table” ceremony. Celebrating their pride in service and the opportunities they found during their military careers, they also acknowledged a survivor’s grief for the fallen, the missing and the families still waiting for final answers.

“They say that for every one with a gun on the front line, there were nine others supporting them,” said Scott Driscol. Driscol and his wife Debbie co-manage the independent retirement community and organized the Veteran’s Day event to honor the service people who live there.

Though not an Estates resident, Harl Porter is a retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel and a member of the Scottish American Military Society (SAMS) along with resident, retired Marine Corps Staff Sergeant and aircraft hydraulics mechanic James Calvert. Wearing (as did Calvert) his family clan’s kilt, Porter educated the Friday crowd about the roots of the Veteran’s Day tradition.

It began spontaneously on Armistice Day in 1918. Scrambling bloody and starving out of World War I trenches, enemy soldiers who had just been doing their best to kill each other crossed combat zones to hold each other up instead, sharing whatever rations and medicines they had left.

That concept of working toward a bigger picture lived on in the service personnel who followed. Marlene Lemon, retired Navy Petty Officer First Class, is an example of those who wore the twin hats of military preparedness and parental responsibility. Lemon served in the Navy Reserves for 20 years, concurrently working full time, raising a son and earning her Master’s degree. Leaving her beloved active-duty Naval career to marry, she later became a teacher in Dorchester School Districts Two and Four.

From supplying the nuclear and gas turbine destroyers that were the new class of ships, Lemon moved her career to the classroom. There she found that the command presence needed to organize and direct sailors also applied to students.

“Being in the reserves was harder than active duty. It was an effort to give up time on the weekends to serve… (But) I loved the Navy and I loved my job. I got out because Jamal’s dad wanted to get married and didn’t want to wait,” she recalled.

“(As a teacher) I’d tell young women, if you’ve got a plan and goals, don’t let anyone disrupt it.”

Also in the spirit of working with a changing bigger picture, retired Air Force Sergeant Rodney Miller spent four years on active duty and other 33 years as a civilian Air Force contractor. Within his role in the auditor general’s department, he watched those decades make a significant turn-about in the service’s demographics.

“In in 1951, my 1,700-member unit was (made up of) 1,700 men. By the end of my 37 years, 84 percent were women,” said Miller.

“They put me in charge of quite a few people and I have to say, very few of my problems came from the ladies. They were solid professionally, socially, in attention to detail and in duty and devotion.”

For 90-year-old retired Air Force Master Sergeant John Jeffries, a recipient of the Bronze Star during Vietnam, that big picture was a geographical experience as well as a figurative one — and one he relished. Crediting his “wonderful wife of 71 years” when he speaks of his long service, Jeffries described being stationed in “fabulous places” such as Korea, Vietnam and Japan, Sumter, South Carolina, Washington, D.C., Alaska and New York.

Jeffries isn’t alone in his nostalgia for the dwellings and destinations of a military life.

“Unbeknownst to me, I took my R and R during the (Vietnam) Tet offensive,” said Calvert, who worked on both the F8 Crusader and the F4B Phantom aircrafts.

“I got 30 days’ free leave anywhere in the world, spent it in Paris, France and toured Europe.”

Miller, who described seeing the Middle East, Germany, England, Egypt and Greece, summed it up:

“Being in the Air Force was the best thing that happened in my life.”

Penn State, Furman get lunch date in Charleston

Furman and Penn State have taken care of business on the early part of their schedules. Now they get an early tip-off away from the comforts of home.The teams meet Thursday in a pre-noon tip in the first round of the Charleston Classic in Charleston, S.C.Penn State (3-0) will play away from home for the first time. Victories against Winthrop, Loyola (Md.) and Butler set the tone for the holiday trip.Penn State coach Micah Shrewsberry has stressed defense and was pleased to see players bring that mindset to open the seaso...

Furman and Penn State have taken care of business on the early part of their schedules. Now they get an early tip-off away from the comforts of home.

The teams meet Thursday in a pre-noon tip in the first round of the Charleston Classic in Charleston, S.C.

Penn State (3-0) will play away from home for the first time. Victories against Winthrop, Loyola (Md.) and Butler set the tone for the holiday trip.

Penn State coach Micah Shrewsberry has stressed defense and was pleased to see players bring that mindset to open the season for the Nittany Lions.

"We're not giving people layups," Shrewsberry said. "We're making them take the shots we want them to take."

Furman (2-0) has topped Division II North Greenville and also defeated Belmont.

"I think we can be one of the best teams that Furman has ever had this season," Paladins forward Jalen Slawson said. "There's no telling how good we can be."

As part of its defensive-minded approach, Penn State has outrebounded all three opponents.

"We've made an emphasis for the team that rebounds are what we have to be successful in," Shrewsberry said.

Offensively, the Nittany Lions have created better looks for Jalen Pickett, who produced the second triple-double in Penn State history in the Butler game.

"That's the expectations that I have for him," Shrewsberry said. "He's adjusting as the game goes. There may be things he misses early on in the game, but he makes the switch pretty quickly after learning about it."

Coach Bob Richey's Furman team was 22-12 last season and motivated "to take that next step," he said.

Slawson, a fifth-year player and the Southern Conference's Defensive Player of the Year last season, grew up in Summerville, S.C., which is about 25 miles away from the tournament site. He needs 18 points to become the 50th Furman player to reach 1,000 career points.

This is the second Furman-Penn State meeting, with the Nittany Lions winning 12 years ago at home.

Both teams are assured Friday games in the second round of the tournament, meeting either Old Dominion or Virginia Tech.

More must-reads:

ENGESER USA Corp. establishing first North American manufacturing operation in Dorchester County

COLUMBIA, S.C. – ...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – ENGESER USA Corp., a world leading cable specialist, today announced plans to establish operations in Dorchester County. The company’s $1.5 million investment will create 26 new jobs.

Founded in 1983 and headquartered in Schramberg, Germany, ENGESER USA Corp. designs and manufactures high-quality products for cable and connection technology ranging from classic cable assembly to comprehensive system solutions. A family-owned company, ENGESER USA Corp. serves automotive applications, consumer and capital goods, solar engineering, rail technology and more.

Located at 115 Fabricators Street in Summerville, ENGESER USA Corp.’s Dorchester County facility is the company’s first North American manufacturing operation and will allow the company to offer direct delivery domestically and to European customers. The new facility will utilize modern technologies to produce cost-optimized, high-quality cable harnesses, one of ENGESER USA Corp.’s core areas of expertise.

Operations are expected to be online by September 2022. Individuals interested in joining the ENGESER USA Corp. team should visit the company’s careers page.

The Coordinating Council for Economic Development has awarded a $75,000 Set-Aside grant to Dorchester County to assist with costs related to this project.

QUOTES

“From the search for a location to the founding of the company, we were professionally accompanied by Dorchester County and the South Carolina Department of Commerce. As an experienced cable assembly products supplier, we are confident that we can add value to our customers in the United States. We intend to continue growing in Summerville and want to become an attractive employer.” -ENGESER USA Corp. Managing Director Dirk Kinzel

"South Carolina has earned a global reputation as an ideal location for companies to do business, and we are happy to welcome ENGESER USA Corp. to our roster of international firms operating in our state. We look forward to the impact they will make in the Dorchester County community and across all of South Carolina.” -Gov. Henry McMaster

“We congratulate ENGESER USA Corp. on their first North American operation right here in South Carolina. By locating in Dorchester County, ENGESER USA Corp. is telling the world that our state has the workforce and business-friendly environment in place to attract companies of all types. We look forward to a strong partnership for many years to come.” -Secretary of Commerce Harry M. Lightsey III

“We welcome ENGESER USA Corp. to Dorchester County and thank them for selecting us as their first location within the U.S. On behalf of the county, congratulations, and best wishes for future success.” -Dorchester County Council Chairman Bill Hearn

“We are pleased ENGESER USA Corp. selected the Charleston region for its first U.S. operation. They join an established group of German companies who are thriving here, and we look forward to ENGESER’s continued growth and expansion. The company will be a tremendous asset to our growing automotive cluster.” -Charleston Regional Development Alliance Board Chairman Mike Fuller

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.