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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Summerville, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Summerville, SC

ENGESER USA Corp. establishing first North American manufacturing operation in Dorchester County

COLUMBIA, S.C. – ...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – ENGESER USA Corp., a world leading cable specialist, today announced plans to establish operations in Dorchester County. The company’s $1.5 million investment will create 26 new jobs.

Founded in 1983 and headquartered in Schramberg, Germany, ENGESER USA Corp. designs and manufactures high-quality products for cable and connection technology ranging from classic cable assembly to comprehensive system solutions. A family-owned company, ENGESER USA Corp. serves automotive applications, consumer and capital goods, solar engineering, rail technology and more.

Located at 115 Fabricators Street in Summerville, ENGESER USA Corp.’s Dorchester County facility is the company’s first North American manufacturing operation and will allow the company to offer direct delivery domestically and to European customers. The new facility will utilize modern technologies to produce cost-optimized, high-quality cable harnesses, one of ENGESER USA Corp.’s core areas of expertise.

Operations are expected to be online by September 2022. Individuals interested in joining the ENGESER USA Corp. team should visit the company’s careers page.

The Coordinating Council for Economic Development has awarded a $75,000 Set-Aside grant to Dorchester County to assist with costs related to this project.

QUOTES

“From the search for a location to the founding of the company, we were professionally accompanied by Dorchester County and the South Carolina Department of Commerce. As an experienced cable assembly products supplier, we are confident that we can add value to our customers in the United States. We intend to continue growing in Summerville and want to become an attractive employer.” -ENGESER USA Corp. Managing Director Dirk Kinzel

"South Carolina has earned a global reputation as an ideal location for companies to do business, and we are happy to welcome ENGESER USA Corp. to our roster of international firms operating in our state. We look forward to the impact they will make in the Dorchester County community and across all of South Carolina.” -Gov. Henry McMaster

“We congratulate ENGESER USA Corp. on their first North American operation right here in South Carolina. By locating in Dorchester County, ENGESER USA Corp. is telling the world that our state has the workforce and business-friendly environment in place to attract companies of all types. We look forward to a strong partnership for many years to come.” -Secretary of Commerce Harry M. Lightsey III

“We welcome ENGESER USA Corp. to Dorchester County and thank them for selecting us as their first location within the U.S. On behalf of the county, congratulations, and best wishes for future success.” -Dorchester County Council Chairman Bill Hearn

“We are pleased ENGESER USA Corp. selected the Charleston region for its first U.S. operation. They join an established group of German companies who are thriving here, and we look forward to ENGESER’s continued growth and expansion. The company will be a tremendous asset to our growing automotive cluster.” -Charleston Regional Development Alliance Board Chairman Mike Fuller

KION North America expanding operations in Dorchester County

Estimated $40 million investment will create approximately 450 new jobs COLUMBIA, S.C. – KION North America, a member of the KION Group, today announced plans to expand operations in Dorchester County. The company’s estimated $40 million investment will create approximately 450 new jobs.KION North America is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of industrial trucks. The company’s brands, Li...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – KION North America, a member of the KION Group, today announced plans to expand operations in Dorchester County. The company’s estimated $40 million investment will create approximately 450 new jobs.

KION North America is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of industrial trucks. The company’s brands, Linde Material Handling and Baoli, serve the specific requirements of the North American market with a comprehensive and complementary product portfolio known for innovative technologies, low energy consumption and low operating costs.

Headquartered at 2450 W. 5th Street in Summerville, KION North America is reshoring the manufacturing of core components including forklift masts. The company is also adding assembly lines that will involve the installation of crane systems, automated weld systems, new paint facilities and more.

The expansion is expected to be complete in 2024. Individuals interested in joining the KION North America team should visit the company’s careers page.

The Coordinating Council for Economic Development approved job development credits related to this project. The council also approved a $500,000 Set-Aside grant to assist with the costs of site preparation and building construction.

QUOTES

“We are proud to be investing in South Carolina, particularly in Dorchester County. Both the state and county have been excellent partners in this process. The KION Group is highly committed to expanding in the U.S., Canada and Mexico and believes customers deserve products customized for these markets. We look forward to reaching more customers with our full-scale traditional lift truck portfolio and custom solutions such as automation, telematics and fleet management.” -KION North America President and Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Dawley

“Thanks to our state’s exceptional workforce and business-friendly environment, global leaders like KION Group are finding success here and driving our economy forward. Congratulations to KION North America on this latest expansion.” -Gov. Henry McMaster

“We applaud KION North America’s ongoing growth in Dorchester County and the new opportunities they are creating for South Carolinians with this expansion. When a company decides to grow its footprint in South Carolina, it reiterates our state’s support for existing industries.” -Secretary of Commerce Harry M. Lightsey III

“KION North America has been a valued part of Dorchester County, and we are thankful for their continued presence and new investment in our comunity. Congratulations KION North America on your new expansion, and we wish you continued success.” -Dorchester County Council Chairman Bill Hearn

FIVE FAST FACTS

Summerville Boys enter season ranked and with big expectations

The Summerville Boys returned all but one starter plus its sixth man and seventh man for the 2022-23 basketball season.“Self-expectations are high coming off a 14-9 season with a 6-2 region record, a second-round playoff appearance and many important pieces returning,” Summerville coach David Long said. “We feel like this year’s team has a chance to be very good, but we understand there is a long way to go to reach our full potential. That is our team goal every season and where we end up is simply the destinat...

The Summerville Boys returned all but one starter plus its sixth man and seventh man for the 2022-23 basketball season.

“Self-expectations are high coming off a 14-9 season with a 6-2 region record, a second-round playoff appearance and many important pieces returning,” Summerville coach David Long said. “We feel like this year’s team has a chance to be very good, but we understand there is a long way to go to reach our full potential. That is our team goal every season and where we end up is simply the destination. With some luck and a good bounce or two, we feel like we could have a special season.”

All-state guard Yannick Smith returned to lead the Green Wave. As a sophomore last season, he averaged a team-high 19 points per game. Senior Forward Delvin Davis is back after averaging six rebounds per game last season and sophomore guard Melvin Teal returned after averaging four assists per game. Senior forward Mike Jenkins is the other returning starter while senior guard Jai’viaun Chisolm and sophomore center Yasir Smith are back after making key contributions off the bench during the last campaign.

During preseason activities, junior Kenneth Brown and freshman Josiah Taylor, both guards, led the way for a promising group of players in their first year with the Green Wave varsity team. Rounding out the team’s roster are juniors Lance Metz, Sheldon Glenn and Jonas Nelson, and sophomore Warren Nelson.

Summerville jumped out to a 4-1 start this season. During its home opener against Stratford Dec. 2, Long substituted players four and five at a time and it didn’t slow his team down as it rolled to an 83-46 victory.

During a Thanksgiving tournament at River Bluff Nov. 21-23, Summerville defeated Lakewood and Pendleton before suffering a 48-45 loss to Wando. The Green Wave then avenged that first loss, defeating Wando 70-56 Nov. 29 in Mount Pleasant.

“Our keys to success will be incorporating our many football players after their very successful season, sorting out our playing-time rotation and continuing to improve as a team,” Long said. “We will be challenged throughout the season with a very difficult schedule. Along with our region foes, we have some very strong non-region teams on the schedule. We expect some great competition at the Pro Skills Basketball Showcase at Goose Creek and the Poinsettia Classic at Greenville High School both in December.”

Summerville is ranked fifth in the South Carolina Basketball Coaches Association Class AAAAA preseason rankings. The Green Wave is scheduled for road games at Beaufort, the No. 6 ranked 3A team in the state, Dec. 5 and Bishop England Dec. 7. Summerville then hosts Carolina Forest Dec. 9, Cane Bay Dec. 12 and Sumter Dec. 14. Sumter is ranked ninth in 5A and Cane Bay is ranked 10th.

The first week of January, Summerville will play at Lexington and at Goose Creek. The Wild Cats are the top-ranked 5A team while the Gators are ranked third.

NSTIC OTA Delivers Accelerated Hypersonic Weapons Testing

SUMMERVILLE, S.C., Dec. 6, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Pentagon leadership has sent a clear signal that the Department of Defense (DoD) must accelerate hypersonic weapon system development activities to counter rapid expansion of hypersonic capabilities both in China and Russia. The Army, Navy, and Air Force all now have prototype hypersonic weapon systems in various stages of development, with growing budget requests to support development, test, and demonstration activities. The acceleration of hypersonic development and testing is increasing str...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C., Dec. 6, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Pentagon leadership has sent a clear signal that the Department of Defense (DoD) must accelerate hypersonic weapon system development activities to counter rapid expansion of hypersonic capabilities both in China and Russia. The Army, Navy, and Air Force all now have prototype hypersonic weapon systems in various stages of development, with growing budget requests to support development, test, and demonstration activities. The acceleration of hypersonic development and testing is increasing strain on the nation's major test ranges and the limited number of mobile instrumentation assets to support hypersonic weapons testing. To address the widening gap between the need to test new weapon systems and available test assets, the DoD needs to rapidly field cost-effective test assets in the near term while putting in place long-term strategies to support dramatically increased testing requirements in the future.

Faced with the compounding problem of needing to accelerate weapon systems development, increase flight testing complexity and cadence, and modernize range test and evaluation assets, the DoD has begun to increasingly rely on the utility, timeliness, and flexibility of Other Transaction Authority (OTA) contracts. OTAs are binding agreements between the DoD and industry partners that offer greater flexibility than traditional FAR-based contracts and allow for rapid acquisition of commercial technologies or development of prototype technologies to meet Defense requirements. Whereas traditional acquisitions with FAR-based contracts can take years to contract, OTAs can often be executed within a few months.

The speed of the Naval Surface Technology Innovation Consortium's (NSTIC) OTA, managed by Advanced Technology International (ATI) and Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Dahlgren, allowed for a 90-day turn from Request for Prototype Proposal (RPP) to contract award, enabling the Conventional Prompt Strike (CPS) hypersonic development program to contract with a Non-Traditional Defense Contractor to provide new, low-cost sensor technologies to support critical flight test activities. The award of the Maritime Networked Test Asset (MaNTA) OTA prototype demonstration effort to Raven Defense, a Non-Traditional Defense Contractor in Albuquerque, NM, enabled the rapid development and fielding of new high-performance test assets capable of being deployed in the Broad Ocean Area (BOA) to collect mid-course and terminal area sensor data critical to flight test objectives. The prototype system was built, tested, and fielded within 18 months. Had a traditional FAR-based contracting approach been used for this rapid and evolving need, the new test capability could not have been contracted in time to support the first use need, delaying critical hypersonic test milestones and increasing test costs.

The flexibility of this OTA has enabled the DoD to access up to four commercially leased MaNTA systems simultaneously to support multiple flight test events for multiple DoD agencies in multiple areas of operation. In addition, rapid modification of the base contract has expanded technical requirements for the MaNTA system resulting in the procurement of multiple enhanced MaNTA systems. The government-owned 'MaNTA+' system will be outfitted with advanced technologies including multi-beam phased array tracking systems to support ongoing test operations in a Government Owned/Contractor Operated arrangement, reducing long-term operations and maintenance costs.

The ongoing partnership between NSWC Dahlgren, ATI, and Raven Defense highlights the best facets of DoD use of OTAs. Open and transparent communications between the team members, rapid response to an ever-changing environment with shifting test schedules, and agile contracting delivered significant value to the DoD on an otherwise impossible schedule. A bridge in testing capability is now in place to support cost-effective hypersonic testing in the BOA with plans in motion to continue to develop assets to support the increasing demand signal for test and answer the Pentagon's call to support accelerated hypersonic weapon system testing.

ABOUT ATI

ATI, a public-service nonprofit based in Summerville, South Carolina, builds and manages collaborations that conduct research and development of new technologies to solve our nation's national security challenges. Fueled by a community of experts from industry, academia, and government, ATI accelerates impact by using the power of collaboration to help the federal government quickly acquire novel technologies. ATI is a subsidiary of Analytic Services, Inc. (ANSER), a public-service research institute organized as a nonprofit corporation, which is dedicated to informing decisions that shape the nation's future.

ABOUT NSTIC

The Naval Surface Technology & Innovation Consortium (NSTIC) advances naval surface technology innovation through a consortium that researches, develops, tests, and integrates complex naval warfare systems across a broad range of technology areas and disciplines. NSTIC is sponsored by Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) and managed by Advanced Technology International (ATI).

ABOUT RAVEN DEFENSE

Raven Defense is a non-traditional Defense Contractor based in Albuquerque, NM which specializes in the development of highly specialized technical equipment to meet our customer's demanding requirements in satellite communications and ground stations, deployable sensors, and cutting-edge research, development, test and evaluation systems. Within the company's initial five years in business, Raven Defense has leveraged internal investments to rapidly develop and deploy key technologies supporting strategic DoD flight test requirements across three core product lines. The Raven Advanced Phased-array Telemetry Resource (RAPTR) is a modular and scalable multi-beam antenna system which has been fielded and continues to successfully support flight test operations installed on airborne, maritime, and ground platforms. The Telemetry and Launch Operations Node (TALON) is a high performance and scalable, motion compensated parabolic reflector based antenna system. TALON is scalable from 2.4m to 9m and beyond with single and multi-band feeds available from UHF through Q-Band. The company's Maritime Networked Test Asset (MaNTA) brings both RAPTR and TALON together with advanced C2 functions, a physical and cybersecurity framework, and multi-redundant SATCOM resources in a Roll-On / Roll-Off maritime flight test support platform. All of these product lines are currently supporting key DoD objectives and continue to be enhanced to provide greater utility at lower costs for future test events.

ATI.org | LinkedIn | Twitter | collaborATIon app

SOURCE ATI (Advanced Technology International)

Summerville Preservation Society celebrates 50 years

While Summerville celebrates its 175th birthday, the organization most active in safeguarding the city’s history is marking its own 50th anniversary and five decades of watering Flower Town’s roots.The Summerville Preservation Society (SPS) chartered in March 1972, and while its membership numbers have expanded from that original core group to more than 500, its mission remains the same. By protecting and showcasing the landmark facets of what the town has been, the SPS hopes to imbue a pride of place that lingers on in wh...

While Summerville celebrates its 175th birthday, the organization most active in safeguarding the city’s history is marking its own 50th anniversary and five decades of watering Flower Town’s roots.

The Summerville Preservation Society (SPS) chartered in March 1972, and while its membership numbers have expanded from that original core group to more than 500, its mission remains the same. By protecting and showcasing the landmark facets of what the town has been, the SPS hopes to imbue a pride of place that lingers on in what it becomes.

“Everything we undertake, we do for the benefit of the citizens. We do this so that the people who come after us can appreciate Summerville,” said Heyward Hutson, SPS President since 1988. Hutson’s great-great grandfather, Reverend Robert Ilderton Limehouse, built Summerville’s first Town Hall in 1860 and later served as Mayor of Summerville. The “new” Town Hall moved to Hutchinson Square in 1892.

With his encyclopedic memory for names and events, Hutson stood on the original heart pine planks of Old Town Hall and described the village that Summerville once was, as if he had just strolled its 1800s marketplace.

“The planters came to Summerville to spend the hot months, from the last frost in spring to the first frost in fall. They came in wagons, with their cows and their chickens, all along the Grand Way, which is now West Carolina Avenue,” said Hutson, a retired Army Colonel who was elected to the South Carolina Legislature four years after he became SPS President. He was born in Summerville in 1936.

“At that time, the first Town Hall was the center of the village, and the market was just out front there.”

The SPS kicked off its long, private non-profit career by rescuing an old Magnolia Street home from “rack and ruin,” and later thwarted several attempts to demolish the old Dorchester County Hospital — now repurposed in its original state as the Dorchester County Human Services Building.

Its next coup was the 1990 purchase of Old Town Hall, one of many structures devastated by Hurricane Hugo and the thousands of trees it toppled throughout the Lowcountry. Taking the venerable building “as-is,” the SPS replaced the roof on one of the wings and repaired it according to historic standards and has maintained it as its seat of operations ever since.

Crediting the real estate agent and the lawyer who gave their services for free to make that transaction happen, Hutson also noted that the relatively small membership of the SPS’ 1990 roster managed to pay off the remaining $85,000 loan in eight years — despite the 10 percent interest rate.

Aside from the restoration of a few key historic buildings, the SPS also began the historic marker project — the signposts at landmark sites that give a brief description of each.

Involving a protracted process of site research, obtaining approval from the state Department of Archives and History, financing each piece and finally, purchasing and installing each marker, the SPS project has claimed historic designation for several well-known Summerville spots: Guerin’s Pharmacy, the Pine Forest Inn, McKissick Summerville High School, The Old White Meeting House, Stallsville, Old Town Hall, Bacon’s Bridge and Tea Farm Road.

Other SPS projects include its fund-raisers, which feature local writers and artists. The SPS painting series features the work of nine area artists, all of which memorialize historic sites throughout Summerville and Dorchester County. The book, “Beth’s Pineland Village,” is still selling copies 35 years later. With half its proceeds going to the SPS and half to the historic Timrod Library, it is a compilation of Summerville Scene newspaper articles written by Beth McIntosh, the first president of the SPS and a former member of the Summerville City Council.

The SPS hosts regular “Heritage Series” panel discussions that are open to the public, and expanded the historic district by adding additional designations, such as St. Stephens Chapel.

Finally, the society also established an awards program to honor the lengths that owners must go through in order to restore and maintain their historic properties.

Just a quick Internet glance indicates that repair costs for a historic Charleston home run anywhere from $250,000 to $1.3 million — and that’s just for repairs, not yearly upkeep. On the other hand, having vibrant historic districts in a city also increases property values and homeowner returns on investments.

Of course, not all of Summerville is historic, and keeping a town healthy is a balancing act. The bustle of modern commerce is necessary for a thriving economy, ensuring jobs for residents and enough quality goods and services to attract and keep the money at home. But unchecked, that same hustle and bustle can trample the character of a place into the dust.

“We are not opposed to the development of boutique hotels,” said Hutson.

“We are opposed to high-concentration developments that tear down existing historic homes when there are vacant lots available nearby. It’s unbridled development that we’re opposed to. But while some Summerville old-timers aren’t happy about the congestion, we need to realize that the new people who have come here bring new talent and, sometimes, as much or more respect for the history of Summerville and Dorchester County than even some of the natives have.”

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