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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Summers Corner, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Like clockwork, hordes of these birds flock to Lake Murray each summer. What draws them?

Odds are, if you’ve been to Lake Murray in the summertime, you’ve seen thousands of indigo birds dotting the Carolina sky.Purple Martins are a local phenomenon that visit Bomb Island every summer in July and August. First discovered on the island in 1988, the birds visit North America in the summer but travel back down to Brazil during the colder months.Why they choose this particular island year after year is a mystery that has fascinated lake-goers and birdwatchers for decades. The warm climate, a natural barrier ...

Odds are, if you’ve been to Lake Murray in the summertime, you’ve seen thousands of indigo birds dotting the Carolina sky.

Purple Martins are a local phenomenon that visit Bomb Island every summer in July and August. First discovered on the island in 1988, the birds visit North America in the summer but travel back down to Brazil during the colder months.

Why they choose this particular island year after year is a mystery that has fascinated lake-goers and birdwatchers for decades. The warm climate, a natural barrier of protection from predators and a bountiful population of insects entices the Purple Martins each year to reunite at Lake Murray.

Zach Steinhauser, a wildlife specialist at Wingard’s Market, has spent the last five years studying the Martins. Traveling between nesting spots from South Florida through southern Canada and the Rocky Mountains, Steinhauser fell in love with the birds.

“I just wanted to do more to connect people to nature, and I found out about Purple Martins,” Steinhauser said. “It let me onto talking to experts from all around the world finding out how can people really get on board with conserving Purple Martins and doing more to conserve nature just in their little corner of the world.”

Though the Bomb Island population wasn’t discovered until the 1980s, Purple Martins were a significant part of Native American and colonial culture. As the human population in North America grew and encroached on the Martins’ habitats, the birds became accustomed to nesting in dried gourds or birdhouses. Now, the birds exclusively nest in structures, rather than within natural cavity nesting spots.

“If you put a dead tree with a bunch of woodpecker holes in front of it, they wouldn’t know what to do with it,” Steinhauser said.

Because Bomb Island is somewhat isolated — it’s more than a mile to shore in any direction — the Purple Martins rest there for the summer. The birds, however, nest elsewhere in the state.

“It’s part of their natural behavior to just all congregate before they migrate. And this island serves as that site. There’s a lot of protection from predators, whether it’s birds of prey or land-based predators like snakes and raccoons,” Steinhauser said.

South Carolina is historically an agrarian state. Because Purple Martins feast on bugs and pests that may harm crops, the birds have been celebrated in the Palmetto State for centuries. In the modern era, the species has become a backyard sensation for residents and visitors at Lake Murray.

A Lexington native, Steinhauser spent his teen years watching the Purple Martins while playing along the lake. His curious nature sparked a question, “What happens when we quit putting these birdhouses out?”

To answer this, Steinhauser set out with his camera and launched a documentary on Earth Day 2022 to encourage conservation efforts for the Martins. Bomb Island is North America’s first officially designated Purple Martin sanctuary.

“They resemble our greatest or probably our best connection to conserving nature and conserving wildlife. We just have this great relationship; humans love to watch birds for some reason,” Steinhauser laughed.

Steinhauser’s film, “Purple Haze,” will have upcoming screenings across South Carolina:

This story was originally published August 10, 2022 5:00 AM.

Animal shelters fill with cats and dogs across South Carolina

Too many animals, not enough space — that's been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is "at the breaking point."Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger building for...

Too many animals, not enough space — that's been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.

The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is "at the breaking point."

Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger building for a little over a year, but has so many animals it has resorted to using pop-up cages.

The Horry County Animal Care Center in Conway has had to temporarily close to treat animals after taking in over 170 animals in August.

Shelters all over are experiencing overwhelming numbers of animals making it difficult to keep up to give them homes.

In the Upstate, Greenville County Animal Care has so many animals it is euthanizing some for space — something they hate doing, said Paula Church, the shelter's community relations coordinator.

She said they look at animals with behavioral issues — for example, if a dog had bitten a child — and severe medical issues that would require lots of time and expense.

"If we had the time, we could find placement for them," Church said. "But we don't have months and months to find space for animals that have behavior and medical issues."

Part of the problem was caused by the winding down of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, which at first took the burden off shelters as more people adopted pets to keep families busy or to be company for employees working from home.

Joe Elmore, president and CEO of Charleston Animal Society, said shelters had been anticipating intake numbers to increase after that initial adoption surge. When lockdowns first began in 2020, the American Veterinary Medical Association recommended all veterinarians in the country pull back from elective procedures, such as spaying and neutering, so it would not tax the healthcare system.

"We usually do about 10,000 surgeries a year," Elmore said. "But in the spring of 2020, when hospitals were overwhelmed, we stopped doing those elective type of procedures. We only did what was necessary and pulled back the number of public spay-neutering."

Elmore said shelters are now seeing the results of putting off those surgeries, with more animals being born than there are people who can keep them.

Other factors also are at play. Of the 75 animal shelters in South Carolina, 75 percent of them do not have a veterinarian on staff, according to Elmore. This makes adoption harder because state law mandates the animals cannot be adopted unless they are fixed.

State law also says an animal that is brought to a shelter must be held for five days before being treated.

As people move in, animals move out

In areas like Charleston County, growth and development are also a factor in overcrowding. As more people and buildings push strays and feral animals out of their natural habitat, more of those animals are surrendered to shelters.

"We get calls from time to time here with people saying, 'I've gotten deer in my yard, and I've never had deer in my yard.' It's because they're being flushed out from the development," Elmore said. "The same thing will happen with feral cats and dogs. Folks will then start calling animal control, animal control will go out and start bringing more and more of these animals in."

Dorchester Paws, which has been operating over maximum capacity and been "in crisis mode" all summer, understands that growth and development in the Summerville area is having a huge impact on animals. Danielle Zuck, marketing and development director, said there are plans for Dorchester Paws to get a new, bigger building.

"Our building was designed to be a holding facility 50 years ago," Zuck said. "It was not designed to have taken 4,000 animals a year, and that's the number that we're anticipating taking this year, if not more."

Usually, Dorchester Paws takes in about 10 to 15 animals per day on average, Zuck said. Recently, it has been taking in 15 to 35 animals per day. That, combined with slower adoptions, is playing a big part in the overcrowding of the shelter.

"We're constantly playing this jigsaw game of animals," Zuck said.

Not only is the building old and too small to accommodate all of those pets, it also is in a flood zone. Every time it rains, Dorchester Paws is flooded and the animals in kennels are stuck standing in water, Zuck said. The staff has to take buckets to try and empty the shelter of floodwater.

In December, Dorchester Paws purchased land along Highway 17A — not in a flood zone. Now they're in the midst of a financial campaign to help fund a new building on the property, one that will include a spay and neuter clinic. They are still in the process of figuring out the cost of building, but it's estimated to cost somewhere between $3 and $8 million.

Zuck said Dorchester Paws is excited the new location will be in a growing neighborhood, right by the Palms and Summer's Corner.

"Summerville is one of the fastest growing cities," Zuck said. "We need the shelter badly in order to provide for the new population that's coming in."

A new building will also help Dorchester Paws elevate its status as a shelter, she added.

"A lot of people still don't know that Dorchester Paws exists. They either call us the pound, or they don't know where we're located," Zuck said. "A new shelter will just bring this brand up and elevate our mission for the animals."

Right now, Dorchester Paws has over 400 animals in their care, with almost half of them living in a kennel or pop-up in the shelter.

Zuck said the shelter has made Dorchester Paws' adoption process simple over the past year to try and incentivize people to adopt: just a one-page application, reduced fees and a conversation with an adoption counselor.

"We have removed all barriers from the adoption process," Zuck said. "We want animals to be placed in loving homes."

Zuck said it is hard to say why adoptions have been slow, but there could be several reasons: summer vacation, back-to-school, current world affairs.

One thing that isn't a factor is a significant uptick in pets adopted in 2020 going back to shelters. Elmore said it is a myth that people surrendered their animals as soon as they returned to work.

"We saw some people who were returning to work actually coming back to adopt a companion animal for the animal," Elmore said.

As a result of most shelters in the state being overcrowded, some are partnering up to ship animals to others that don't have as many animals.

Elmore, of Charleston Animals Society, said they've started a statewide transport program where his staff takes animals to other local shelters, and even ones out of state. Some shelters Charleston Animals Society partners with include Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary in Hollywood and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals.

Church, of Greenville County Animal Care, said the shelter partners with rescue organizations almost daily to transport animals to other shelters. Some organizations they partner with include the Animal Sanctuary Society (New Jersey), Hearts of the North Rescue (Minnesota), Jackson's Legacy (New York) and Lovable Mutts Adoption Center (Pennsylvania).

Tiffany Hoffman, event coordinator for Berkeley Animal Center, said the shelter is lined up with pop-ups.

"As much as I don't want a dog in a pop-up, it's still saving a life," Hoffman said.

The center has recently relocated to a bigger building with more amenities, including a surgical suite, a meet-and-greet room and play yards. After being in the new building for 14 months, Hoffman said the staff are grateful they now have more space and are able to not just take better care of the animals they have, but also take in more.

"We are able to care for more animals, but with that, we need more fosters. We need more volunteers, more adopters," Hoffman said. "With (the new building) comes the need for the community."

Hoffman said there are many community members that already help. Those who foster pets are essential.

"We have a very hardworking staff, but we could not save the thousands of animals without the fosters," Hoffman said.

Hoffman said fostering from Berkeley Animal Center is completely free, and they have a 24/7 phone service for fosters in case they have questions about the animal they're taking care of. She said the center also provides food crates and medical care.

"We literally give everything needed," Hoffman said. "They just have to give the love."

Hoffman said the staff — a group of just over 10 — often fosters animals as well.

"Our staff work here because they love animals," Hoffman said. "If you work in animal rescue, if you work in an animal shelter, you do it because of your love of an animal."

Animal shelters fill with cats and dogs across S. Carolina

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.

The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”

Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger building for a little over a year, but has so many animals it has resorted to using pop-up cages.

The Horry County Animal Care Center in Conway has had to temporarily close to treat animals after taking in over 170 animals in August.

Shelters all over are experiencing overwhelming numbers of animals making it difficult to keep up to give them homes.

In the Upstate, Greenville County Animal Care has so many animals it is euthanizing some for space — something they hate doing, said Paula Church, the shelter’s community relations coordinator.

She said they look at animals with behavioral issues — for example, if a dog had bitten a child — and severe medical issues that would require lots of time and expense.

“If we had the time, we could find placement for them,” Church said. “But we don’t have months and months to find space for animals that have behavior and medical issues.”

Part of the problem was caused by the winding down of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, which at first took the burden off shelters as more people adopted pets to keep families busy or to be company for employees working from home.

Joe Elmore, president and CEO of Charleston Animal Society, said shelters had been anticipating intake numbers to increase after that initial adoption surge. When lockdowns first began in 2020, the American Veterinary Medical Association recommended all veterinarians in the country pull back from elective procedures, such as spaying and neutering, so it would not tax the healthcare system.

“We usually do about 10,000 surgeries a year,” Elmore said. “But in the spring of 2020, when hospitals were overwhelmed, we stopped doing those elective type of procedures. We only did what was necessary and pulled back the number of public spay-neutering.”

Elmore said shelters are now seeing the results of putting off those surgeries, with more animals being born than there are people who can keep them.

Other factors also are at play. Of the 75 animal shelters in South Carolina, 75 percent of them do not have a veterinarian on staff, according to Elmore. This makes adoption harder because state law mandates the animals cannot be adopted unless they are fixed.

State law also says an animal that is brought to a shelter must be held for five days before being treated.

As people move in, animals move out

In areas like Charleston County, growth and development are also a factor in overcrowding. As more people and buildings push strays and feral animals out of their natural habitat, more of those animals are surrendered to shelters.

“We get calls from time to time here with people saying, ‘I’ve gotten deer in my yard, and I’ve never had deer in my yard.’ It’s because they’re being flushed out from the development,” Elmore said. “The same thing will happen with feral cats and dogs. Folks will then start calling animal control, animal control will go out and start bringing more and more of these animals in.”

Dorchester Paws, which has been operating over maximum capacity and been “in crisis mode” all summer, understands that growth and development in the Summerville area is having a huge impact on animals. Danielle Zuck, marketing and development director, said there are plans for Dorchester Paws to get a new, bigger building.

“Our building was designed to be a holding facility 50 years ago,” Zuck said. “It was not designed to have taken 4,000 animals a year, and that’s the number that we’re anticipating taking this year, if not more.”

Usually, Dorchester Paws takes in about 10 to 15 animals per day on average, Zuck said. Recently, it has been taking in 15 to 35 animals per day. That, combined with slower adoptions, is playing a big part in the overcrowding of the shelter.

“We’re constantly playing this jigsaw game of animals,” Zuck said.

Not only is the building old and too small to accommodate all of those pets, it also is in a flood zone. Every time it rains, Dorchester Paws is flooded and the animals in kennels are stuck standing in water, Zuck said. The staff has to take buckets to try and empty the shelter of floodwater.

In December, Dorchester Paws purchased land along Highway 17A — not in a flood zone. Now they’re in the midst of a financial campaign to help fund a new building on the property, one that will include a spay and neuter clinic. They are still in the process of figuring out the cost of building, but it’s estimated to cost somewhere between $3 and $8 million.

Zuck said Dorchester Paws is excited the new location will be in a growing neighborhood, right by the Palms and Summer’s Corner.

“Summerville is one of the fastest growing cities,” Zuck said. “We need the shelter badly in order to provide for the new population that’s coming in.”

A new building will also help Dorchester Paws elevate its status as a shelter, she added.

“A lot of people still don’t know that Dorchester Paws exists. They either call us the pound, or they don’t know where we’re located,” Zuck said. “A new shelter will just bring this brand up and elevate our mission for the animals.”

Right now, Dorchester Paws has over 400 animals in their care, with almost half of them living in a kennel or pop-up in the shelter.

Zuck said the shelter has made Dorchester Paws’ adoption process simple over the past year to try and incentivize people to adopt: just a one-page application, reduced fees and a conversation with an adoption counselor.

“We have removed all barriers from the adoption process,” Zuck said. “We want animals to be placed in loving homes.”

Zuck said it is hard to say why adoptions have been slow, but there could be several reasons: summer vacation, back-to-school, current world affairs.

One thing that isn’t a factor is a significant uptick in pets adopted in 2020 going back to shelters. Elmore said it is a myth that people surrendered their animals as soon as they returned to work.

“We saw some people who were returning to work actually coming back to adopt a companion animal for the animal,” Elmore said.

As a result of most shelters in the state being overcrowded, some are partnering up to ship animals to others that don’t have as many animals.

Elmore, of Charleston Animals Society, said they’ve started a statewide transport program where his staff takes animals to other local shelters, and even ones out of state. Some shelters Charleston Animals Society partners with include Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary in Hollywood and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals.

Church, of Greenville County Animal Care, said the shelter partners with rescue organizations almost daily to transport animals to other shelters. Some organizations they partner with include the Animal Sanctuary Society (New Jersey), Hearts of the North Rescue (Minnesota), Jackson’s Legacy (New York) and Lovable Mutts Adoption Center (Pennsylvania).

Tiffany Hoffman, event coordinator for Berkeley Animal Center, said the shelter is lined up with pop-ups.

“As much as I don’t want a dog in a pop-up, it’s still saving a life,” Hoffman said.

The center has recently relocated to a bigger building with more amenities, including a surgical suite, a meet-and-greet room and play yards. After being in the new building for 14 months, Hoffman said the staff are grateful they now have more space and are able to not just take better care of the animals they have, but also take in more.

“We are able to care for more animals, but with that, we need more fosters. We need more volunteers, more adopters,” Hoffman said. “With (the new building) comes the need for the community.”

Hoffman said there are many community members that already help. Those who foster pets are essential.

“We have a very hardworking staff, but we could not save the thousands of animals without the fosters,” Hoffman said.

Hoffman said fostering from Berkeley Animal Center is completely free, and they have a 24/7 phone service for fosters in case they have questions about the animal they’re taking care of. She said the center also provides food crates and medical care.

“We literally give everything needed,” Hoffman said. “They just have to give the love.”

Hoffman said the staff — a group of just over 10 — often fosters animals as well.

“Our staff work here because they love animals,” Hoffman said. “If you work in animal rescue, if you work in an animal shelter, you do it because of your love of an animal.”

Animal shelters in SC are at a breaking point. Pet adoptions can’t keep up with intake

Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger buil...

Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.

The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”

Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger building for a little over a year, but has so many animals it has resorted to using pop-up cages.

The Horry County Animal Care Center in Conway has had to temporarily close to treat animals after taking in over 170 animals in August.

In the upstate, Greenville County Animal Care has so many animals it is euthanizing some for space — something they hate doing, said Paula Church, the shelter’s community relations coordinator.

She said they look at animals with behavioral issues — for example, if a dog had bitten a child — and severe medical issues that would require lots of time and expense.

“If we had the time, we could find placement for them,” Church said. “But we don’t have months and months to find space for animals that have behavior and medical issues.”

Part of the problem was caused by the winding down of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, which at first took the burden off shelters as more people adopted pets to keep families busy or to be company for employees working from home.

Joe Elmore, president and CEO of Charleston Animal Society, said shelters had been anticipating intake numbers to increase after that initial adoption surge. When lockdowns first began in 2020, the American Veterinary Medical Association recommended all veterinarians in the country pull back from elective procedures, such as spaying and neutering, so it would not tax the healthcare system.

“We usually do about 10,000 surgeries a year,” Elmore said. “But in the spring of 2020, when hospitals were overwhelmed, we stopped doing those elective type of procedures. We only did what was necessary and pulled back the number of public spay-neutering.”

Elmore said shelters are now seeing the results of putting off those surgeries, with more animals being born than there are people who can keep them.

Other factors also are at play. Of the 75 animal shelters in South Carolina, 75 percent of them do not have a veterinarian on staff, according to Elmore. This makes adoption harder because state law mandates the animals cannot be adopted unless they are fixed.

State law also says an animal that is brought to a shelter must be held for five days before being treated.

As people move in, animals move out

In areas like Charleston County, growth and development are also a factor in overcrowding. As more people and buildings push strays and feral animals out of their natural habitat, more of those animals are surrendered to shelters.

“We get calls from time to time here with people saying, ‘I’ve gotten deer in my yard, and I’ve never had deer in my yard.’ It’s because they’re being flushed out from the development,” Elmore said. “The same thing will happen with feral cats and dogs. Folks will then start calling animal control, animal control will go out and start bringing more and more of these animals in.”

Dorchester Paws, which has been operating over maximum capacity and been “in crisis mode” all summer, understands that growth and development in the Summerville area is having a huge impact on animals. Danielle Zuck, marketing and development director, said there are plans for Dorchester Paws to get a new, bigger building.

“Our building was designed to be a holding facility 50 years ago,” Zuck said. “It was not designed to have taken 4,000 animals a year, and that’s the number that we’re anticipating taking this year, if not more.”

Usually, Dorchester Paws takes in about 10 to 15 animals per day on average, Zuck said. Recently, it has been taking in 15 to 35 animals per day. That, combined with slower adoptions, is playing a big part in the overcrowding of the shelter.

“We’re constantly playing this jigsaw game of animals,” Zuck said.

Not only is the building old and too small to accommodate all of those pets, it also is in a flood zone. Every time it rains, Dorchester Paws is flooded and the animals in kennels are stuck standing in water, Zuck said. The staff has to take buckets to try and empty the shelter of floodwater.

In December, Dorchester Paws purchased land along Highway 17A — not in a flood zone. Now they’re in the midst of a financial campaign to help fund a new building on the property, one that will include a spay and neuter clinic. They are still in the process of figuring out the cost of building, but it’s estimated to cost somewhere between $3 and $8 million.

Zuck said Dorchester Paws is excited the new location will be in a growing neighborhood, right by the Palms and Summer’s Corner.

“Summerville is one of the fastest growing cities,” Zuck said. “We need the shelter badly in order to provide for the new population that’s coming in.”

A new building will also help Dorchester Paws elevate its status as a shelter, she added.

“A lot of people still don’t know that Dorchester Paws exists. They either call us the pound, or they don’t know where we’re located,” Zuck said. “A new shelter will just bring this brand up and elevate our mission for the animals.”

Right now, Dorchester Paws has over 400 animals in their care, with almost half of them living in a kennel or pop-up in the shelter.

Zuck said the shelter has made Dorchester Paws’ adoption process simple over the past year to try and incentivize people to adopt: just a one-page application, reduced fees and a conversation with an adoption counselor.

“We have removed all barriers from the adoption process,” Zuck said. “We want animals to be placed in loving homes.”

Zuck said it is hard to say why adoptions have been slow, but there could be several reasons: summer vacation, back-to-school, current world affairs.

One thing that isn’t a factor is a significant uptick in pets adopted in 2020 going back to shelters. Elmore said it is a myth that people surrendered their animals as soon as they returned to work.

“We saw some people who were returning to work actually coming back to adopt a companion animal for the animal,” Elmore said.

Finding homes

As a result of most shelters in the state being overcrowded, some are partnering up to ship animals to others that don’t have as many animals.

Elmore, of Charleston Animals Society, said they’ve started a statewide transport program where his staff takes animals to other local shelters, and even ones out of state. Some shelters Charleston Animals Society partners with include Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary in Hollywood and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals.

Church, of Greenville County Animal Care, said the shelter partners with rescue organizations almost daily to transport animals to other shelters. Some organizations they partner with include the Animal Sanctuary Society (New Jersey), Hearts of the North Rescue (Minnesota), Jackson’s Legacy (New York) and Lovable Mutts Adoption Center (Pennsylvania).

Tiffany Hoffman, event coordinator for Berkeley Animal Center, said the shelter is lined up with pop-ups.

“As much as I don’t want a dog in a pop-up, it’s still saving a life,” Hoffman said.

The center has recently relocated to a bigger building with more amenities, including a surgical suite, a meet-and-greet room and play yards. After being in the new building for 14 months, Hoffman said the staff are grateful they now have more space and are able to not just take better care of the animals they have, but also take in more.

“We are able to care for more animals, but with that, we need more fosters. We need more volunteers, more adopters,” Hoffman said. “With (the new building) comes the need for the community.”

Hoffman said there are many community members that already help. Those who foster pets are essential.

“We have a very hardworking staff, but we could not save the thousands of animals without the fosters,” Hoffman said.

Hoffman said fostering from Berkeley Animal Center is completely free, and they have a 24/7 phone service for fosters in case they have questions about the animal they’re taking care of. She said the center also provides food crates and medical care.

“We literally give everything needed,” Hoffman said. “They just have to give the love.”

Hoffman said the staff — a group of just over 10 — often fosters animals as well.

“Our staff work here because they love animals,” Hoffman said. “If you work in animal rescue, if you work in an animal shelter, you do it because of your love of an animal.”

Another boutique hotel could be coming to Greenville on the West End

Another boutique hotel could be coming soon to downtown Greenville’s West End.Spartanburg-based Pinnacle Partnership and Atlanta-based Gateway Ventures are developing a mixed-use project at 319 Rhett Street and South Main Street in Greenville’s West End that would include luxury apartm...

Another boutique hotel could be coming soon to downtown Greenville’s West End.

Spartanburg-based Pinnacle Partnership and Atlanta-based Gateway Ventures are developing a mixed-use project at 319 Rhett Street and South Main Street in Greenville’s West End that would include luxury apartments, a Hilton-branded boutique hotel, two restaurants, and upgraded streetscaping.

The city's Design Review Board will have to approve the design for the project to proceed.

“We are working with experienced and trusted partners to develop a beautiful multi-use project at 319 Rhett Street in Greenville,” Crystal Pace, vice president of sales and public relations for Pinnacle Partnership, said in an email. “Our hope is to take this undeveloped and vacant site in the heart of the West End and develop it in a beautiful and thoughtful way.”

The property at 319 Rhett Street that would house the hotel and residential units has a paved lot and an old building that once housed an industrial equipment supplier, while the smaller, adjacent property that fronts South Main Street is vacant. The land is collectively valued at more than $3 million, according to county land records.

Architects ODA Architecture and Dynamik Design are designing a nine-story, 110,000 square-foot, 154-room hotel. Amenities would include a first-floor bar and lounge while the ninth floor would have a rooftop bar and patio and 2,000 square feet of meeting space.

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The mixed-use portion of the development would feature 248 residential units, two restaurants, and a 525-space parking garage that would be primarily underground, according to developers' initial plans. Local firm MKSK Architects is designing the streetscape.

The developers are early in the design process, and they’re focusing their efforts on neighborhood meetings and design reviews for the residential component, Pace said. More details are expected to follow once those meetings are complete.

A neighborhood meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. on Sept. 21 at the Unity Park Community Center at 111 Welborn Street.

The hotel would be just up the street from Kimpton Hotels & Residences’ boutique hotel and luxury residential tower at the corner of North Markley and Rhett streets, which is slated for completion in summer 2024.

It would also join the likes of boutique Grand Bohemian Lodge, which just opened near Falls Park in the heart of downtown.

The newest proposal comes as occupancy rates for downtown Greenville hotels continue to trend up since the pandemic. The occupancy rate was 72% from January to June, up from 59% during the same timeframe in 2021. Rooms sold increased 22% year over year from January to June, according to data provided by marketing organization VisitGreenvilleSC.

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