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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Sullivan's Island, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Men's lacrosse announces 2023 signing class

RICHMOND, Va. – Richmond men's lacrosse announced the members of its 2023 signing class Wednesday, one week after prospective student-athletes enrolling in college in 2023 were first eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent.Twelve players signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Richmond and compete for the Spiders as freshmen in 2023-24. The group is comprised of five players from New York – including three players from Long Island – two players from Ontario, and one each from Georgia, Mass...

RICHMOND, Va. – Richmond men's lacrosse announced the members of its 2023 signing class Wednesday, one week after prospective student-athletes enrolling in college in 2023 were first eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent.

Twelve players signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Richmond and compete for the Spiders as freshmen in 2023-24. The group is comprised of five players from New York – including three players from Long Island – two players from Ontario, and one each from Georgia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia.

"The 12 young men that just signed their NLIs are an accomplished group," said Spiders head coach Dan Chemotti. "They are stellar students, from lacrosse hotbeds and non-traditional areas, including Canada, and they have excelled in a variety of sports. Above all else, they are phenomenal people with great character who have what it takes to continue the championship culture we've established over the last 10 years. The level of talent in this class is a credit to the hard work by our assistant coaches and the fact that the University of Richmond is, without question, the full package."

Richmond is one of the nation's most successful men's lacrosse programs, having reached the NCAA Tournament in four of the last eight seasons. The Spiders, 2022 Southern Conference champions, have played in eight straight conference championship games, the longest active streak in Division I. In May, the program announced it would move to the Atlantic 10 in 2023 to compete in the inaugural season of A-10 men's lacrosse. UR will be joined by High Point, Hobart, Massachusetts, Saint Joseph's, and St. Bonaventure in the league.

Names, positions, high schools, and hometowns for Richmond's 2023 signing class are below.

NAME (POSITION) - HIGH SCHOOL (HOMETOWN) Gavin Creo (Attack) - Chaminade (Rockville Centre, NY) Michael Fagen (Midfield) - Lynbrook (Lynbrook, NY) Lucas Littlejohn (Attack/Midfield) - Holy Trinity (Courtice, Ontario) Luke Meyer (Attack/Midfield) - Port Washington (Port Washington, NY) Nate Murphy (Defense) - Paul VI (Chantilly, VA) Charlie Packard (Midfield) - Hingham (Hingham, MA) Brayden Penafeather-Stevenson (Defense) - Baldwinsville (Baldwinsville, NY) Sean Siegel (Defense) - Byram Hills (Pleasantville, NY) Lucas Slate (Attack/Midfield) - Episcopal (Downingtown, PA) Tye Steenhuis (Midfield) - Hill Academy (St. Catharines, Ontario) Jackson Strickland (Face Off) - Calvert Hall (Sullivan's Island, SC) Aidan Wooley (Midfield) - Westminster (Atlanta, GA)

Message From The Mayor: November 2022

Happy Thanksgiving. We have much to be thankful for in this great country we get to live in and for the piece of paradise we get to call home. I hope you can spend some time with family and friends and take a moment to reflect on all the things we have to be thankful for.Here are nine fun facts about Thanksgiving to share around the dinner table.• The first Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621 over a three day harvest festival. It included 50 Pilgrims, 90 Wampanoag Indians, and lasted three days.• Turkey wasn&rs...

Happy Thanksgiving. We have much to be thankful for in this great country we get to live in and for the piece of paradise we get to call home. I hope you can spend some time with family and friends and take a moment to reflect on all the things we have to be thankful for.

Here are nine fun facts about Thanksgiving to share around the dinner table.

• The first Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621 over a three day harvest festival. It included 50 Pilgrims, 90 Wampanoag Indians, and lasted three days.

• Turkey wasn’t on the menu at the first Thanksgiving. Venison, duck, goose, oysters, lobster, eel, and fish were likely served, alongside pumpkins and cranberries.

• Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a national holiday on Oct. 3, 1863. Sarah Josepha Hale, the woman who wrote “Mary Had A Little Lamb,” convinced Lincoln to make Thanksgiving a national holiday after writing letters for 17 years.

• The history of U.S. presidents pardoning turkeys is patchy. Harry Truman is often credited with being the first president to pardon a turkey, but that’s not quite true. He was the first to receive a ceremonial turkey from the National Turkey Federation – and he had it for dinner. John F. Kennedy was the first to let a Thanksgiving turkey go, followed by Richard Nixon who sent his turkey to a petting zoo. George H.W. Bush is the president who formalized the turkey pardoning tradition in 1989.

• There are four towns in the United States named “Turkey.” They can be found in Arizona, Texas, Louisiana and North Carolina.

• The average number of calories consumed on Thanksgiving is 4,500.

• Butterball answers more than 100,000 turkey cooking questions via their Butterball Turkey Hotline each November and December.

• The tradition of football on Thanksgiving began in 1876 with a game between Yale and Princeton. The first NFL games were played on Thanksgiving in 1920.

• More than 54 million Americans are expected to travel during the Thanksgiving holiday this year

WHAT’S THE LATEST?

As I mentioned in an earlier message, we recently held a beach traffic debrief session with several of our partners – SCDOT, Mount Pleasant, Sullivan’s Island, Folly Beach, County Parks and Channel 4. The goal of this meeting was to recap all the pre-season joint efforts and discuss what worked well and what didn’t and what could be improved upon for next season.

Mayors, city administrators, police chiefs and senior directors were in attendance. There were a number of takeaways for next year – like starting the social media campaign earlier for the spring break crowds. One of the more effective efforts this past season was the Channel 4 Beach Information Station: Know Before you Go campaign. The goal was to raise awareness about all things related to beach travel and safety.

ABC News 4, Trooper Bob along with mayors and Explore Charleston partnered to produce a series of news stories and messages promoting beach information needed to plan a visit. For Folly Beach, IOP and Sullivan’s Island, it detailed weather, radar, tides, parking information, parking, beach and pet rules, dynamic traffic maps, traffic cameras, CARTA beach shuttle information and Charleston County Park information for IOP and Folly Beach. Between promotional messages, news messages, and social media posts there were over 11.5 million impressions by local viewers and visitors. A very successful joint effort in trying to reach those visiting our beaches. We’ve had some lively meetings and public hearings lately with great attendance by our residents. One thing I’m thankful for is the engagement and passion focused on making our island better.

As we all continue to engage and discuss important topics, let’s lead the way in maintaining civility in our dialogues.

The Municipal Association of South Carolina recently created the Pillars of Civility which include:

• Be as eager to listen as to speak.

• Concentrate on what you have in common, not what separates you.

• Your time is valuable. So is everyone else’s. Respect it.

• Act as you would expect someone to act in your home.

• Ask questions to learn. Answer questions with respect.

• Concentrate on facts, not theories.

• Ask “what will persuade people in this room?” not “what will make a great tweet?”

• Make your case on merits, not on what people want to hear.

• Make your point about the issue, not the person.

I might add one to this list: Work to build each other up, not tear each other down. We are all facing whatever life throws our way. Bringing some empathy to the table as a default setting is a great way to approach each other. You can find information for project updates and upcoming meetings on the IOP website at IOP.net.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Nov. 25 – No Coffee with the Mayor this month due to the holiday. Next one is set for Dec. 30 at the Rec Center at 9 a.m.

Dec. 3 – Holiday Street Festival – 2-7 p.m. at FrontBeach. Arts and crafts, food vendors, children’s activities, and live entertainment.

Dec. 8 – Coffee with the Chief – 9-10 a.m. Join Fire Chief Oliverius at Station 1, Public Safety Building Training Room at 30 J C Long Blvd.

Dec. 20 – Santa’s Cookie Workshop – 2 p.m. at the Rec Center.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve. See you around the island.

Phillip Pounds, Mayor

843-252-5359

ppounds@iop.net

An interview with Cadet Col. Brandon Johnson, this year’s Regimental Commander

Each year, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO sits down with the Regimental Commander so that the community gets to know more about the current commander and how he is leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.Cadet. Col. Brandon Johnson was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. He is a Supply Chain Management major and a member of the Junior Sword Arch and the Hollingsworth Society.Earlier this year, Johnson answered a series of questions from Josh Tolbert, this year’s Regimental Public Affairs NCO.Q&...

Each year, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO sits down with the Regimental Commander so that the community gets to know more about the current commander and how he is leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

Cadet. Col. Brandon Johnson was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. He is a Supply Chain Management major and a member of the Junior Sword Arch and the Hollingsworth Society.

Earlier this year, Johnson answered a series of questions from Josh Tolbert, this year’s Regimental Public Affairs NCO.

Q&A with Brandon Johnson

What is one word that you would use to describe yourself?

Fearless.

How do you spend your free time?

I always get a workout and a run in. My schedule is busy, but exercise is a daily priority. On the weekends, I enjoy spending time with friends and family. You can always catch me on the boat or the beach. I live right next to Sullivan’s Island, so I frequently spend time there.

What is a quote you live by?

There are two. The first is just two words — “Never settle.” I first started using this short phrase my sophomore year and it has stuck with me ever since. I also live by the Bible verse Isaiah 6:8: “And I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?’ Then I said, ‘Here am I! Send me.’” Stepping up to a challenge is something I take pride in, and I am always looking for one.

Why did you choose The Citadel?

In high school, I planned on attending the University of South Carolina. I vividly remember sitting down at the dinner table and deciding that I was going to attend The Citadel. I changed my mind because I was seeking a lifestyle that was uncommon for most people my age. I knew the structure and discipline would benefit me. Thankfully I made the right decision, and I have not looked back since.

Who inspires you the most and why?

My father is a huge inspiration for me, his character and selflessness are something I truly admire. No matter what decision I make, he always supports me. I frequently call him to ask for advice and he always seems to have the right answer. Without my parents, I would be no where near where I am today. He has made countless sacrifices for me and my siblings. He always pushes me to be my best in any endeavor.

What made you want to become the Regimental Commander and what are your goals for the school year?

I love The Citadel and wanted to make a difference for my fellow cadets. I am fortunate to have great mentors who always push me to be my best here, and they are a big reason why I made it this far. At the beginning of the year, my main goals were to develop as many leaders as possible, give cadets the ability to lead and to create an environment that is both productive and enjoyable. I want everyone to take pride in their Citadel experience.

As a knob, did you ever see yourself becoming the Regimental Commander?

I was not dead set on becoming the Regimental Commander, however, I knew I could do it if I set my mind to it — I knew I had the potential. I learned early on that my effort was the only limiting factor to my success in life. I always wanted to be a commander at some level. At the end of the day, I wanted to be a leader.

You are the Regimental Commander the same year the Citadel celebrates 100 Years on the Ashley. How important and special is that to you?

It is very important to me. I have always had an astounding amount of respect for all of the classes that came before mine. The legacies they left behind are still carried throughout the Corp of Cadets. The Citadel truly is a special place and it is an honor to be carrying on the legacy of the campus. The cadets are what make the past 100 years so meaningful. Without the past, present and future cadets, The Citadel’s life-changing experience would disappear. I hope to see another 100 years of the road less traveled.

What is your plan after you graduate and what will you miss the most after you graduate?

I am going to begin my career right here in Charleston. Thankfully, I am fortunate to have professional experience in the maritime logistics industry through past internships. I have no doubt I will miss all the brothers and sisters I have gained along the way. I am beyond fortunate to be surrounded by peers who constantly push themselves. Being surrounded by the best 18-to-22-year-olds in the country is a humbling and rewarding experience.

What life lesson have you learned here that you will take with you after you graduate?

I have learned so much that it’s honestly hard to put it into words. I developed what I believe to be the most important and beneficial trait for any human — discipline. I’ve learned that means doing the things you need to do when you don’t want to do them and having a constant force pushing me to be my best every day. Discipline is earned through the challenges we face here.

Joshua Tolbert is a junior from North Charleston, South Carolina and a computer engineering major. On campus, he is the Regimental Public Affairs NCO and participates in the Gospel Choir, African American Association and The National Society of Black Engineers. After graduation, Tolbert plans to become a database administrator.

Related:

Mission Essential: Special Agent Brent Daniels, ’99

Mission Essential: Special Agent Yates Gupton, ’97

“I instantly knew that this was the place for me”: Meet Coast Guard veteran student Ricardo Quintero

Find American history and really big trees at South Carolina’s top national parks

The Palmetto State has more than its fair share of sites that showcase key moments in American history, as well as a national park that showcases astounding champion trees.At these attractions, you can take your sweet time strolling nature paths, listening to the birdsong and admiring nature’s beauty – while learning about the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and Reconstruction.Here are the best national park experiences in...

The Palmetto State has more than its fair share of sites that showcase key moments in American history, as well as a national park that showcases astounding champion trees.

At these attractions, you can take your sweet time strolling nature paths, listening to the birdsong and admiring nature’s beauty – while learning about the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Here are the best national park experiences in South Carolina.

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Admire the majestic trees of Congaree National Park

Discover the towering scope of ancient trees with a visit to South Carolina’s only “scenic” national park. Primordial cypresses, giant upland pines and water tupelos count among its towering specimens – the highest concentration of “champion-size” trees (aka the biggest of their species) anywhere in North America.

Look out for the massive loblolly pine, which rises to over 170ft tall. If that’s not enough, the park also protects the eastern US’s largest tract of old-growth bottomland forest, low-lying land that’s periodically covered by water throughout the year.

The best way to see the trees – and to admire the beauty of this unique park – is along the 2.6-mile elevated Boardwalk Trail. You can also paddle along the Congaree River, its dark, tannic-dyed waters hiding turtles, frogs and other watery life.

Bring your own canoe or kayak, or join a paddling tour led by a park ranger. You can also rent a watercraft in Columbia, a 30-minute drive away.

Feel the Revolution at Cowpens National Battlefield

If you thought the Revolutionary War didn’t extend to the Southern states, think again. Among several battles that took place in South Carolina, one of the most significant took place at Cowpens.

The battle occurred on January 17, 1781, near present-day Gaffney. The site was, literally, a wide-open woodland (or “cowpens”) where early cattle drovers would camp overnight.

On the fateful day, Gen Daniel Morgan strategically deployed his Continental troops here against Lt Col Banastre Tarleton’s forces. The end result: more than 1000 losses for the British and about 150 for the Americans.

The park includes a visitor center and a walking tour through the battlefield.

Consider Charleston’s role in American history at Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park

Two forts guard the entrance to Charleston’s harbor, emblems of South Carolina’s roles in both the Civil War and Revolutionary War.

The more famous of the two is Fort Sumter. On April 12, 1861, the Confederate Army opened fire on the Union fort: the first battle of the Civil War. The bombardment ensued for 34 hours, followed by a Union surrender.

The Confederate troops occupied the installation, making it a symbol of resistance – though constant shelling from Union troops over the course of the war virtually destroyed it. Visitors today can see the cannons and fortifications that remain and hear lots of stories about this crucial fortification.

On nearby Sullivan’s Island, Fort Moultrie is where Col William Moultrie’s South Carolinians warded off a British attack in one of the Revolutionary War’s first Patriot victories.

The only way to visit both forts is by boat shuttle, departing from Liberty Sq in downtown Charleston and Patriots Point across the harbor.

Trace the steps of patriots at Kings Mountain National Military Park

Thomas Jefferson called it the “turn of the tide of success.” During the Revolutionary War, American and Loyalist soldiers clashed on this isolated ridge, just below the North Carolina line, on October 7, 1780.

Fighting tree to tree with rifles and bayonets, the rebels won the first American victory to occur after the British invasion of Charleston.

The park preserves important battle sites, with markers and monuments that detail the action. At the visitor center, you can watch an introductory film, see exhibits and consult a map of the walking trail that winds through the battlefield.

Explore more along the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail, a 330-mile route through Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina that follows the path of the American militia leading up to the battle of Kings Mountain.

You might feel under siege at Ninety Six

In addition to the famous Yorktown, the town of Ninety Six presents some of the Revolutionary War’s best remnants of original siege lines anywhere. Established in the early 1700s, this crossroads town was so named because of its location 96 miles from the nearest Keowee village.

Twelve roads passed through it – more than in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1863 – helping it to flourish in terms of commerce, trade and transportation. Then the war came along.

In November 1775, Americans and Loyalists faced each other in a three-day battle here, ending in an uneasy truce. The Americans built an important post, subsequently seized by the British in 1780.

Another battle erupted in 1781, when Gen Nathanael Greene’s army arrived to take the British fort, initiating what became the war’s longest siege. Greene’s forces ultimately failed – though the British were so weakened, they moved their post to Charleston.

Today, the visitor center has exhibits on the site’s history, while walking trails wander past earthworks, cannon and exhibits.

Learn about plantation life at the Charles Pinckney National Historic Site

As a child, Charles Pinckney split his time between the family’s Charleston mansion and Snee Farm, a rice and indigo plantation just outside of Charleston where enslaved individuals toiled.

Pickney is also known for his political involvement in the revolutionary cause: he contributed at least 25 clauses to the U.S. Constitution, before serving four terms as state governor and Thomas Jefferson’s ambassador to Spain.

But as a member of one of the state’s wealthiest and most politically powerful families, Pinckney inherited the plantation (as well as the Charleston mansion) in 1782 and continued to run the "family business" – thanks to, per the 1810 census, 58 enslaved people.

While much of the plantation was sold off over the years, the NPS has preserved 28 acres of it as the Charles Pinckney National Historic Site, a quiet place sprinkled with ornamental gardens and pockets of moss-draped live oaks.

A visitor center occupies an old 1828 farmhouse, offering exhibits on Pinckney the politician, the African people he enslaved and the operations of the plantation.

There are walking trails and archaeological displays to explore: for instance, archaeologists have unearthed delftware and pearlware once used by the elite. Archaeologists also uncovered a bounty of colonoware – unrefined, handmade earthenware widely used by enslaved people on the property. Farm tours are also available.

Confront one of the US’ most momentous eras at Reconstruction Era National Historical Park

Many historians claim Beaufort County in the Lowcountry to be the birthplace of Reconstruction, the tumultuous, post–Civil War era (between 1861 and 1898) when the reunited nation faced the economic and social legacies of slavery.

Established only in 2019, Reconstruction Era National Historical Park is a work in progress, its aim to spotlight nationally important places and events throughout Beaufort County that reflect this stormy time.

The park includes four sites in and near Beaufort. Penn Center on St Helena Island was founded in 1862 by Northern missionaries as the first school in the South for formerly enslaved West Africans. Today, the historic building houses a cultural and educational center.

Enslaved people constructed Brick Baptist Church on St Helena Island for white planters. After emancipation, the edifice became a school for formerly enslaved individuals, and today it hosts an active church congregation.

On New Year’s Day in 1863, Union Army Gen Rufus Saxton publicly read the Emancipation Proclamation to 3,000 Black soldiers and formerly enslaved people at Port Royal’s Camp Saxton.

The Old Beaufort Firehouse in downtown Beaufort serves as the new park’s visitor center and offers a good starting point for your visit.

Lonely Planet’s USA’s National Parks is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip and what hidden discoveries await you. Marvel at the Grand Canyon, paddle the Everglades and rock climb in Joshua Tree; all with your trusted travel companion.

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Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

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