843-764-3333
7629 Sandlapper Parkway N. Charleston, SC 29420

kitchen countertopsIn Sullivan's Island, SC

Let's Talk!

We offer a wide selection of stones and materials for your next kitchen renovation project:

Kitchen Remodeling Sullivan's Island, SC

Granite

 Bathroom Renovation Sullivan's Island, SC

Marble

 Flooring Sullivan's Island, SC

Quartzite

 Hardwood Flooring Sullivan's Island, SC

Recycle Glass

 Home Renovations Sullivan's Island, SC

Quartz

If you're in need of a professional, fast, reliable company for kitchen cabinets, countertops, and remodels, look no further than Stone City Kitchen & Bath.

RM

What Clients Say About Us

Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

Heading Tag

When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Sullivan's Island, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

Heading Tag

Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-764-3333

Free Consultation

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Sullivan’s Island investigating illegal cutting of maritime forest

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is searching for those responsible for cutting down part of the island’s maritime forest. Town leaders are hoping to establish stricter penalties to prevent future cutting while residents are hoping the trees can be replaced.An employee with the town noticed the cutting around February 9th and reported it to town leaders leading to the town opening an investigation. Town leaders say preventing future cutting might be achieved through jail time or st...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is searching for those responsible for cutting down part of the island’s maritime forest. Town leaders are hoping to establish stricter penalties to prevent future cutting while residents are hoping the trees can be replaced.

An employee with the town noticed the cutting around February 9th and reported it to town leaders leading to the town opening an investigation. Town leaders say preventing future cutting might be achieved through jail time or stricter fines.

“This is the epitome of selfishness,” says Town Councilman Scott Millimet reacting to the cutting.

Island residents were also upset with the cutting. “It’s clear these trees weren’t cut by accident, I mean they were purposefully cut to someone’s benefit,” says one resident.

A number of trees along Station 26, the width of a house were chopped and dropped in the town’s maritime forest. The island’s forest has become the center of a debate to save the town’s accredited land over the last several years.

“It damages everybody, it doesn’t just (damage) the two neighbors,” the resident said.

Dozens of trees have been marked and documented by town employees after being cut down. Councilman Millimet says residents couldn’t believe it when learning of the illegal cutting.

“General shock, frustration – bitterness,” says Councilman Millimet when referring to what he’s heard from residents.

Each tree cut down comes with a $1,040 fine but residents and leaders say that might not be enough to prevent future cutting.

“This just proves that there are those out there that until the punishment is enhanced, it’s going to continue,” says Councilman Millimet.

Councilman Millimet believes the fines should be raised and jail time considered for those responsible. “We can try to do some replanting,” says Councilman Millimet. “And then I think we also need to focus on enhancing the punishment.”

Advocates fighting for the future of the maritime forest agree with the measure. “While there are penalties, they are not severe enough to disincentive someone from potentially doing this again,” says Karen Byko, President of Sullivan’s Island 4 All.

With the damage already done along Station 26, leaders and residents hope they can stop additional chopping in the future.

“At the very least, I hope they replant these trees,” says the resident.

“There’s quite a bit of work to do but like I said we’ve got to get the ball rolling because the longer we wait, certain residents have shown that they will act in their own best interest and we’ve got to figure out how to prevent that,” says Councilman Millimet.

Town officials declined to provide a comment on the latest in the investigation.

Sullivan’s Island restaurant opens with fresh fish, ’1970s-inspired’ beachside aesthetic

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood an...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood and beach-themed cocktails Tuesday through Sunday.

The Towills are the owners of design and hospitality firm Basic Projects. Kate, head of design for the Charleston-based company, has led the design of residential and commercial properties, including an athletic club and Basic Projects’ two other restaurants: Basic Kitchen and Post House.

Alongside her husband, Basic Projects head of operations Eva Suarez and other members of the team, Kate led the two-year renovation of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, where she set out to create a 1970s-inspired beachside aesthetic. Her goal was to give the space a fresh look with elements honoring Sullivan’s Seafood, like a framed flag and original menu.

A place that feels new and nostalgic all at once.

“That’s been the biggest compliment that we have received is (people saying) ‘Oh it feels like it’s been here forever,’ ” Kate Towill said.

Leading the kitchen as executive chef is Davis Hood, who grew up on Isle of Palms with his brother Nathan, culinary director of Basic Projects. Hood, who recalls walking by the Middle Street building on his way to Sullivan’s Island Elementary School, is focusing on sustainability at the new Sullivan’s Island restaurant.

Local purveyors like Abundant Seafood, Tarvin Seafood, Lowcountry Oyster Co., Vertical Roots and Peculiar Pig Farm dot the Sullivan’s Fish Camp menu.

“It’s not your average fish camp in my eyes,” Hood said. “The whole concept of snout to tail cooking, we’re trying to bring that vibe but with fish. Understanding that the ocean is such an important part of our lives and not trying to have any waste.”

If there is one dish that epitomizes this approach, it’s the Sullivan’s Island Gumbo that features Tarvin Seafood shrimp, clams, okra, lobster broth, dayboat fish and Anson Mills Charleston Gold Rice. The West African style gumbo’s gluten-free base is made using chicken bones, lobster shells, shrimp shells, fennel, celery, palm oil and Bradford Family Farm okra, which replaces a roux as the stew’s thickening agent.

Ben Towill said the gumbo, along with the pan-roasted fish of the day and tempura nori tuna with furikake aioli have been some of the restaurant’s top sellers in its first weeks of service.

“We feel like the menu’s been received really well,” Ben Towill said. “Guests and everyone have felt really comfortable which has been a big bonus.”

Fresh seafood isn’t the only element that gives Sullivan’s Fish Camp that desired beachside feel. Self-described “fruity” cocktails like the tequila-based Sumter’s Watch, rum-based Sullivan Swizzle and the frozen paloma will immediately put patrons on island time.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is open for dinner from 5-10 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and lunch is currently served from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. The restaurant plans to eventually serve lunch and dinner daily.

For more information, visit sullivansfishcamp.com or call 843-883-2100.

Army Corps of Engineers surveys erosion damage from Hurricane Ian

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD)- Sand dunes across the Lowcountry kept people safe from Hurricane Ian, but now they are going to need some repairs after the storm eroded sand from the shores.“All things considered the town made out very very well. We can’t find anywhere on Sullivan’s Island where the ocean penetrated behind that primary dune,” said Andy Benke, the Town Administrator for Sullivan’s Island.The island had two places where the storm eroded a significant amount of sand. At Station ...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD)- Sand dunes across the Lowcountry kept people safe from Hurricane Ian, but now they are going to need some repairs after the storm eroded sand from the shores.

“All things considered the town made out very very well. We can’t find anywhere on Sullivan’s Island where the ocean penetrated behind that primary dune,” said Andy Benke, the Town Administrator for Sullivan’s Island.

The island had two places where the storm eroded a significant amount of sand. At Station 22, rainwater that collected behind the first wall of dunes found its way back out to the ocean through a low lying part of the dunes.

The ocean waves smacking up against dunes as tall as 12 feet were eroded at Station 28. The sand that remains makes some of the larger dunes look like a cliff. But, Benke says that’s what they’re supposed to do.

“There are dunes and vegetation that provide relief and change of elevation so that when there is a wave event it slows the wave down quite a bit” said Benke. “The town has this wide track of land between the mean high water mark and the private property line. That’s an extra added protection that we have.”

On Folly Beach, Mayor Tim Goodwin is also dealing with issues from beach erosion.

“We have noticed dune erosion just from Ian,” said Mayor Goodwin. “We know that we need to do some work on the beach. We’ve already started planning on what we can do as a city.’

Unlike Sullivan’s Island, Folly Beach is a federal partner with the Army Corps of Engineers. That means that the city can receive federal funding to help repair their sand dunes. Mayor Goodwin is awaiting the engineers’ report to decide what needs to be done.

“The Army Corps of Engineers has been here to do a survey and we’re waiting on their data to be processed,” said Mayor Goodwin.

“Right now the Myrtle Beach, Pawleys Island and Folly Beach coastlines experienced significant erosion,” said Wes Wilson, a Project Manager for the Army Corps of Engineers.

That process might not be finished until the beginning of 2023 according to the Army Corps of Engineers.

“We’re going to collect that survey information. We’re going to analyze the date and estimate costs and write a report that will be used to see if that project qualifies for emergency rehabilitation,” said Wilson. “Two main factors to consider during the process are the significance of the event and the significance of the damages of the event.”

After that, Congress has to decide whether to give supplemental funds to the Army Corps of Engineers to undertake the repairs.

Officials and engineers want people to remember that the dunes are here to protect and damage to them is much better than damage to people, buildings or roads.

“Sand dunes disappear because we build sand dunes and we work hard to keep sand dunes on the beach because that’s the first line of defense for the beach,” said Mayor Goodwin.

Bids for Dominion’s Sand Dunes Club on Sullivan’s came in $2.8M below prior offer

Dominion Energy hoped to sell the beachfront Sand Dunes Club on Sullivan’s Island for $19 million to a company owned by Ben Navarro, but now plans to sell it for much less — $16.2 million — to the former owner of Money Man Pawn.The $19 million offer from SDC Island Resident Club LLC, a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital, evaporated after the state Public Service Commission ordered the utility to seek bids for the property.Dominion received three bids for the 3.5-acre space and ...

Dominion Energy hoped to sell the beachfront Sand Dunes Club on Sullivan’s Island for $19 million to a company owned by Ben Navarro, but now plans to sell it for much less — $16.2 million — to the former owner of Money Man Pawn.

The $19 million offer from SDC Island Resident Club LLC, a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital, evaporated after the state Public Service Commission ordered the utility to seek bids for the property.

Dominion received three bids for the 3.5-acre space and has asked the Public Service Commission to approve the highest one, the $16.2 million offer.

“Although Dominion Energy would have preferred to sell the property to SDC Island Resident Club LLC for $19 million, that option no longer exists, and the company has concluded that $16.2 million is a fair price for the Sand Dunes Property,” Rhonda O’Banion, media relations manager for Dominion, said April 18.

The PSC order was meant to ensure that utility ratepayers’ interests were being served by seeking the highest price for the property, but appears to have cost them $2.8 million instead.

PSC spokesman Rob Bockman said the commission can’t talk about pending cases under rules of judicial conduct.

Dominion has said in filings to the commission that the sale of the property would not change the utility’s rates or pricing.

Prior to the PSC order in February, Navarro’s company was widely expected to buy the property, partly because Sullivan’s Island signed an agreement with Beemok more than a year ago outlining how the 3.5 acres and historic club could be used.

“While Beemok decided to not take part in the public bid process to acquire the Sand Dunes Club, we are hopeful that the process results in a positive outcome for the Sullivan’s Island community at large,” said Chris Allen, a spokesperson for Beemok Capital.

The company rebuffed questions about why it lost interest after previously offering what would have been by far the highest bid.

The top bid of $16.2 million came from John Derbyshire on behalf of a company called JLLM LLC. In South Carolina, limited liability companies (LLCs) are often created for real estate deals.

“We are hopeful that the property transaction will receive all necessary approvals, and we can move forward in the best interest of our customers and the communities we serve,” said O’Banion.

Derbyshire declined to comment. He’s a former owner of Money Man Pawn, a large chain of pawn shops known for their eye-catching yellow-and-green paint scheme, which was sold for $30 million in 2013.

Derbyshire is also known for accumulating extensive property holdings through foreclosure sales, and for buying local restaurant properties. In 2020, one of his affiliates bought Shem Creek Bar & Grill for $4.9 million, and at the time he owned properties that housed restaurants on Sullivan’s Island and Isle of Palms.

The Sand Dunes Club plan laid out in the memorandum between Beemok and Sullivan’s Island called for using the power company’s facility as a membership club for island residents.

The agreement detailing how the property could be used applies regardless of the owner, according to the town. It’s actually five adjoining properties, and houses could potentially be built on four of them.

The Sand Dunes Club building is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The beachfront venue was once part of Fort Moultrie. In the 1950s, South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the property from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with the fort were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents, and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

Isle of Palms, Sullivan's Island, And Folly Beach: Get To Know Charleston's Beaches

Charleston, South Carolina, has been topping 'the best of lists for years. The historic city has always had a ton to offer, attracting tourists for its southern charm, world-class culinary offerings, antebellum architecture, and lively arts and entertainment scene. Further adding to Charleston's appeal are its beaches.Sitting just a few miles from downtown Charleston is a series of easily accessible small barrier is...

Charleston, South Carolina, has been topping 'the best of lists for years. The historic city has always had a ton to offer, attracting tourists for its southern charm, world-class culinary offerings, antebellum architecture, and lively arts and entertainment scene. Further adding to Charleston's appeal are its beaches.

Sitting just a few miles from downtown Charleston is a series of easily accessible small barrier islands where visitors can enjoy an afternoon at the beach or vice versa. With such close proximity to the city, visitors can choose to base themselves on the beach instead. Each one of the Charleston beaches has its own distinctive vibe and attributes. Here is an overview to help find the perfect fit!

Isle Of Palms

This popular Charleston beach manages to maintain a balance between upscale and classy, as well as hip yet family-friendly. The island is self-catering with ample accommodation options, an extensive retail district, a diverse range of restaurants, and a full-service grocery store. The beach has lifeguards on duty, and there are dressing rooms, restrooms, and snack bar facilities centrally located at the oceanfront County Park.

There are roughly six miles of beach with over 50 access points, so hitting the sand on Isle of Palms is super convenient. The island's two golf courses, The Links Course and Harbor Course were both designed by a world-renowned golf architect. Visiting the Windjammer is a must. A long-time staple of the island (more than 50 years in business), the Windjammer is an oceanfront sandbar that hosts frequent concerts, beach volleyball tournaments, and more. Oh, and dogs are welcome at the Windjammer too!

Sullivan's Island

This quaint 3.3 square mile island can be summed up by three S's: serenity, slow pace, and simple pleasures. The town has actively worked to preserve its quiet character, and as such, short-term rentals of less than 30 days are prohibited. Nestled between Charleston Harbor and Isle of Palms, it remains close and convenient to explore for the day while staying elsewhere.

One of the oldest-standing forts on the East Coast is located on Sullivan's Island. Fort Moultrie was first constructed as a Revolutionary War defense in the 1700s but was once again put to use during the Civil War. Fort Moultrie is open to the public and remains a top tourist attraction. Fabled author Edgar Allen Poe was stationed at Fort Moultrie during his stint in the army, and Sullivan's Island served as the setting for some of his literary works. Nowadays, the quirky and eclectic Poe's Tavern pays homage to its namesake and is one of the most beloved local eateries.

Sullivan's Island is the perfect spot for those looking to escape the hustle and bustle and simply have a relaxing day at the beach. The wide, flat beach is great for strolling along the shore or riding bikes at low tide, and the prevailing winds are excellent for kiteboarding. Ocean enthusiasts can also fish, kayak, and paddleboard, and land-lovers can enjoy the island's several parks and recreation areas too. The restaurants along Middle Street offer wonderful food and alfresco dining in a fun atmosphere, often with live entertainment.

Folly Beach

Affectionately referred to as the 'edge of America', Folly Beach is a funky beach community that has retained much of its charm and unique character. A long-time haven for surfers, College of Charleston students, artists, and salty seafarers, Folly Beach has somewhat of a cult following amongst vacationers too. Folly-devotees return to their beloved beach year after year and rarely venture elsewhere. The island has a relaxed, working-class vibe, and long-time locals foster a palpable sense of community.

Swing by Bert's Market and fill up the cooler before hitting the beach. Bert's is a local institution that adheres to its 'we may doze but we never close' slogan; they are open around the clock and are much more than just a market. Folly Beach is regarded as one of the top surfing destinations in the southeast, and there are two full-service surf shops on Folly. Experienced surfers can head to The Washout section of the beach, or novices can take a surf lesson with one of the several surf schools on the island. Kayaks or stand-up paddleboards are an excellent way to explore Folly's extensive network of marshes and inlets.

The main shopping and dining hub of Folly Beach is Center Street, and it is well worth a stroll. The eclectic shops have lots of local and handcrafted items rather than just tacky souvenirs. Center Street and the surrounding blocks are also packed with dozens of eating and drinking locales for every taste and budget, as well as bars and nightlife. Come as you are - the ambiance everywhere is unpretentious, and flip-flops are always welcome.

One of the best ways to get around the 12-square-mile island is by golf cart. Just be aware that they cannot travel down Center Street (but they can traverse it to cross to/from the East and West sides of the island).

Bonus Beach: Kiawah Island

Although Kiawah is a huge vacation destination, it wasn't initially included as one of the main Charleston-area beaches simply because many areas of the island and its beaches are private. Kiawah is gated, and visitors can only access certain restricted areas with a guest or owner's pass; not everything is accessible to the public. Nonetheless, Kiawah is worth a mention as it is a popular vacation spot and has its own unique draw.

As one may expect, Kiawah is a luxury vacation destination. The resort accommodations, vacation home rentals, and amenities are world-class, as are Kiawah's dining options. The island's five golf courses are also top-notch, frequently hosting PGA Tour and other top-level events. Kiawah was also named the #1 tennis resort in the world!

Visitors can take advantage of public beach access at Beachwalker County Park, just before the guard station. Bring your own bike to enjoy the full 10 miles of pristine Kiawah Island beach without needing to show a pass.

Life Is Better At The Beach

While the Charleston area is surrounded by dozens of barrier islands, these beaches are the main hot spots to stay and play. The beaches make a great addition to any Charleston vacation itinerary, but they each have plenty to offer as a stand-alone destination too. Visitors can settle down, relax, and enjoy the slower pace of island time!

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.