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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Sullivan's Island, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Charleston County to gather input on affordable housing strategy

The Charleston County Department of Housing and Neighborhood Revitalization is gathering input on residents’ struggles with attaining affordable housing through a new survey and in seven public meetings over the next few weeks. Citizens are encouraged to participate.“We have a solid understanding of housing needs in Charleston County, and now we’re exploring the tools at our disposal and detailing strategies that will work best for Charleston County residents,” said Darrell Davis, director of Charleston County&...

The Charleston County Department of Housing and Neighborhood Revitalization is gathering input on residents’ struggles with attaining affordable housing through a new survey and in seven public meetings over the next few weeks. Citizens are encouraged to participate.

“We have a solid understanding of housing needs in Charleston County, and now we’re exploring the tools at our disposal and detailing strategies that will work best for Charleston County residents,” said Darrell Davis, director of Charleston County’s Housing and Neighborhood Revitalization Department. “Charleston County is big and complex, and we’re identifying what strategies will have the most impact and support throughout the county.”

Residents can take the survey here or go to the Charleston County Public Library at 68 Calhoun St. downtown to fill out a hard copy.

The department will host public meetings at several locations (see below for specifics) in the area to talk about housing needs and receive feedback from the community about the county’s fair housing strategy, which is called “Housing Our Future.”

Housing Our Future is the county’s first comprehensive affordable housing plan to address affordability challenges, housing needs and resource programming. It is an integrative approach that connects local officials, community partners and residents with a system to navigate challenges and address inequitable housing.

The Housing and Neighborhood Revitalization Department will host public meetings at the following times and locations to discuss housing needs and get feedback:

Mount Pleasant: 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Aug. 30, Wando Mount Pleasant Library, 1400 Carolina Park Blvd.

James Island: 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Sept. 7, James Island Town Hall, 1122 Dills Bluff Road.

Charleston: 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sept. .12, Charleston County Public Library, 68 Calhoun St.

Johns Island: Noon to 2 p.m., Sept. 13, Johns Island Library, 3531 Maybank Highway.

McClellanville: 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Sept. 13, Buckshot’s Restaurant, 10030 Highway 17.

Sullivan’s Island: 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Sept. 14, Sullivan’s Island Town Hall, 2056 Middle St.

North Charleston: 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sept. 14, Public Services Building, 4045 Bridge View Drive.

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How did SC get the Palmetto State nickname? It wasn’t just because there are lots of palmettos

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.Also called the cabbage palmetto, s...

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?

While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.

The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.

Also called the cabbage palmetto, sabal palm, inodes palmetto and the Carolina palmetto, the sabal palmetto was designated as the official state tree by Joint Resolution Number 63 all the way back on March 17, 1939.

This palmetto tree was symbolic toward the defeat of the British fleet at Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island during the Battle of Sullivan’s Island. This was due to the fact that the fort was built from palmetto logs, which absorbed the impact of the cannon balls and would not shatter.

Hence, South Carolina earned its nickname: the Palmetto State.

The Battle of Sullivan’s Island was the first decisive American victory over the British Royal Navy during the Revolutionary War and took place on June 28, 1776.

“The ferocity of the British naval bombardment had no great effect on the fort. Sabal palmetto trunks embedded in deep sand proved pliable and sturdy enough, absorbing iron balls like a sponge,” wrote the National Park Service of the battle.

At the time, Charleston residents were unaware if the fort had been victorious against the British or if it had been captured following the Battle of Sullivan’s Island.

The fort’s commander, Colonel William Moultrie, had then sent a boat to inform the residents of the good news. Loud cheers were said to reverberate through the streets.

“The defense had been a major victory for the Americans in Charleston. General Lee wrote, ‘The behavior of the Garrison, both men and officers, with Colonel Moultrie at their head, I confess astonished me.’ Six days later the Declaration of Independence was signed in Philadelphia. Afterwards, the South Carolina General Assembly renamed the fort, Fort Moultrie, in honor of the commander of Fort Sullivan,” wrote the American Battlefield Trust.

As for the palmetto trees themselves, sabal palms are native to the southeastern parts of the country.

“The cabbage palmetto is found in the coastal plain region from North Carolina to Florida. The palm inhabits maritime forests, “islands” within salt and brackish marshes, and the edges of ponds. It is also a commonly planted tree in urban areas throughout South Carolina,” states the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

The palmetto tree can grow to a height of 33 feet tall and its leaves can grow to about 3 feet across. They are formed with a spongier, scattered tissue and more malleable cells than most other trees, which allow them to bend with the wind during major storms such as hurricanes and tropical storms.

In addition to their many other attributes, these trees flower during the month of July and can be quite fragrant, attracting many types of pollinators.

As for size, according to Plant Real Florida, the University of Florida conducted several age and growth rates of sabal palms, the preliminary results indicated that, under average conditions in the wild, these plants can require 10 to 15 years of growth or more from seed to the first sign of a trunk at ground level. After this initial growth spurt, the trunks will grow about 6 inches per year. Meaning, a standing sabal palm with 20 feet of trunk is at least 50 years old.

The palmetto tree can be seen as a figure of significance in nearly every aspect of the state’s inception. It has been adopted as the state’s nickname, is included in the state seal, is on the state flag, is in the Pledge to the Flag of South Carolina, and can be seen in everyday life while carrying on day-to-day activities within the state.

This story was originally published September 14, 2022 5:00 AM.

Labor Day crowds return to normal for beach businesses

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” s...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.

Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.

“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” said Kathleen Arnold, fine art consultant at Sandpiper Gallery on Sullivan’s Island. “The traffic is constant, back and forth. People walking to the restaurants, people heading to the beach.”

Arnold said in her experience, the tourism season on Sullivan’s Island typically lasts from May until Labor Day weekend every year. However, after seeing tourist travel ebb and flow “practically year-round” in recent years, she expects the season to last through October or November.

“People want to escape the hustle and bustle of life, so they come here,” Arnold said, attributing the steady growth of tourism to Charleston’s “small-town charm.”

Leaders at Folly Beach agree. Mayor Tim Goodwin said stores there are struggling to keep up with an increase of both foot traffic — and car traffic — from tourists and locals this summer.

“Sunday was a pile of people out here,” Goodwin said. “The first time this year we’ve seen traffic backed up as far as it was.”

Goodwin encouraged anyone heading to the water to use the free Beach Reach app. Created by the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, the app provides live traffic cameras, maps and beach policies for three of Charleston’s most popular beaches.

The mayor said the biggest challenges facing store owners at Folly Beach are a lack of workers and employee burnout. As a result, some stores are struggling to keep their normal hours.

Click here to learn more about the town of Sullivan’s Island.

LOWVELO gearing up to be the best event ever; Glow Blue activities to include mechanical bull

While he watched his mother fight cancer, Matt Miller of Greenwood, South Carolina, never knew he would end up in a similar battle. “I always remembered her saying ‘I knew I had cancer. I just went to the doctor for my diagnosis,’” said Miller. “I didn’t truly get what she was saying until I also knew for myself.”In late 2019, Miller was diagnosed with stage two colorectal cancer. Not long after, he underwent emergency surgery. “I was fortunate to dodge chemotherapy and radiation but was...

While he watched his mother fight cancer, Matt Miller of Greenwood, South Carolina, never knew he would end up in a similar battle. “I always remembered her saying ‘I knew I had cancer. I just went to the doctor for my diagnosis,’” said Miller. “I didn’t truly get what she was saying until I also knew for myself.”

In late 2019, Miller was diagnosed with stage two colorectal cancer. Not long after, he underwent emergency surgery. “I was fortunate to dodge chemotherapy and radiation but was forced to accept surgery as the only option to remove the mass,” Miller said.

This fall, his musical group, The Jake Bartley Band, will be headlining the LOWVELO finish-line block party. This annual fundraising event will be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, and 100% of the money raised by participants will fund lifesaving cancer research at MUSC Hollings Cancer Center, the only National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center in South Carolina. Participants can choose from four routes, stationary cycling, a virtual ride option or volunteering.

It’s a special time for survivors to gather; for Miller, this gives him a chance to support lifesaving cancer research following his own lifesaving treatment.

“Without organizations like MUSC stepping up through LOWVELO and connecting the funding dots, we would still be in the Stone Age of cancer research and treatment development,” said Miller. “LOWVELO is invaluable to those of us fighting.”

Hollings director Raymond N. DuBois, M.D., Ph.D., said this event brings together survivors, the community and Hollings researchers and clinicians in a powerful way. “Cancer touches everyone in some way. And this event is an opportunity for us to celebrate the advances we’re making and support research that will provide tomorrow’s cures as well,” said DuBois. “It’s so fun every year to see the excitement of the people who support us. It inspires us to work harder.”

An exciting addition to this year’s event is a Hollings rally line. Three of the routes will start at Brittlebank Park in Charleston and go past Hollings Cancer Center on Calhoun Street as participants then head to and across the Ravenel Bridge and through some of the most scenic areas of the Lowcountry. Another addition is a rolling lane closure throughout downtown and across the Ravenel Bridge, allowing riders more room and minimizing the impact on local neighborhoods.

“Similar to Charleston hospitality, there is really no route quite like the LOWVELO routes. They are so unique,” said Medalist Sports President Chris Aronhalt, who helps manage the event. “The scenic and breathtaking routes of LOWVELO take riders through the historic streets of downtown, across the famous Ravenel Bridge, through beautiful neighborhoods east of the Cooper River, into the Francis Marion National Forest and along stunning beach views on Sullivan’s Island and Isle of Palms. It’s a mix of all the best the Lowcountry has to offer.”

The LOWVELO fun starts this month with the annual Glow Blue Week, Sept. 19 to 23, held on the MUSC campus. Hollings Cancer Center will be lit up in blue all week long. Registration for the ride will be free, and the LOWVELO team will be handing out fun swag around campus. The week features a special glow-in-the-dark stationary cycling class on Wednesday, Sept. 21; participants can reserve their spots.

On Thursday, Sept. 22, LOWVELO team members will be on the MUSC Greenway with information, fun swag items and a chance to ride Bucky the mechanical bull from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. They also will be out there from 9 p.m to midnight.

On Friday, Sept. 23, the second LOWVELO as a Lifestyle Lunch and Learn will be held. Participants can join in person or online to hear from Sundar Balasubramanian, Ph.D., a world-renowned expert in yogic breathing and stress release. Also joining him will be a Wellness Center trainer who will teach mobility exercises.

On Friday, Nov. 4, the evening before the Nov. 5 LOWVELO event, there will be a packet pick-up party at Firefly Distillery. MUSC participants have two opportunities to get their packets at Hollings on Nov. 3: from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

No matter how people choose to participate, everyone involved is invited to join in the block party at the finish line, with live music, food and fun to celebrate cancer survivors and honor loved ones lost to the disease. This includes volunteers. It takes more than 300 volunteers to make the event a success, so people are needed for a variety of positions, from manning a rest stop to being an event photographer.

Miller said participants can expect a diverse and entertaining show. He and The Jake Bartley Band will be playing everything from country to funk and dance tunes and are excited to be part of the big LOWVELO block party. Miller knows how very fortunate he has been and offered up some advice for others fighting cancer.

“Surround yourself with others that have fought and won and don’t be afraid to reach out to a counselor or therapist for help also,” he said. “Keep your head up! Just like me, you didn’t ask to be in the cancer club, but you’re here now and part of a group of fighters that are all fiercely cheering for you to win.”

Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

Mount Pleasant is one of South Carolina's top five agglomerations. The town's atmosphere is less focused on tourists and more on the communities, particularly the adjacent beaches at Sullivan's Island and Isle of Palms. The city is considered one of the best locations to live in by various social and economic indicators. Mount Pleasant embraces the Holy City's laid-back low country way of life.Geography And Climate Of Mount Plea...

Mount Pleasant is one of South Carolina's top five agglomerations. The town's atmosphere is less focused on tourists and more on the communities, particularly the adjacent beaches at Sullivan's Island and Isle of Palms. The city is considered one of the best locations to live in by various social and economic indicators. Mount Pleasant embraces the Holy City's laid-back low country way of life.

Geography And Climate Of Mount Pleasant

Mount Pleasant is a big suburban town situated in Charleston County in the US State of South Carolina. The town is well positioned on the east and northeast sides of Charleston Harbor and the tidal Wando River. The distance between the town and Charlotte, North Carolina, is 177 miles south and 4 miles east of Charleston, South Carolina. The town is situated in the Charleston-North Charleston metropolitan region. Mount Pleasant covers a total area of 151.87 sq.km, of which 128.27 sq.km is occupied by land and 23.60 sq.km is covered by water.

The year-round weather of Mount Pleasant is rainy and partially gloomy, with hot, stifling summers and chilly, windy winters. The average yearly temperature ranges between 43°F and 88°F, rarely falling below 30°F or rising above 93°F. The year's hottest month is July, having an average daily high temperature exceeding 83°F. With an average daily maximum temperature below 65°F, January is the year's coldest month. The average annual rainfall is 48 inches, while the average annual snowfall is 0 inches in Mount Pleasant.

Brief History Of Mount Pleasant

The Sewee Indians had previously inhabited Mount Pleasant when the first European settlers under Captain Florentia O'Sullivan left England on July 6, 1680. The 2,340 acres that Captain O'Sullivan received contained both the island bearing his name and the land that would eventually become Mount Pleasant. This region was labeled "North Point" on the earliest maps available at the time. Mount Pleasant was essential in the Revolutionary War's first significant military victory. The area was formally constituted as the town of Mount Pleasant in 1837. After the Civil War, numerous freed slaves moved to the region. Robert Scanlon, one of them, went on to develop and lead Charleston Land Company. As a result of the division of Charleston County in 1882, Mount Pleasant became the first county seat in Berkeley County. After fifteen years, it was decided that Moncks Corner would serve as the county seat, and Mount Pleasant returned to its original boundaries in 1897, once more being under the jurisdiction of Charleston County.

The Population And Economy Of Mount Pleasant

Mount Pleasant has 95,393 residents, making it the fourth most populous city in South Carolina out of 472 communities, despite being considered a suburban town in concept. The population of Mount Pleasant has declined since the most recent census, which showed a population of 90,801 in 2020, and is currently rising at a pace of 2.47% annually. White (non-Hispanic) (89.6%), Black or African American (non-Hispanic) (3.98%), Two+ (non-Hispanic) (1.93%), Asian (non-Hispanic) (1.83%), and White (Hispanic) (1.78%) make up Mount Pleasant's top five ethnic groups. Mount Pleasant has a 5.11% poverty rate and a $138,416 average household income. The median cost of rent is $1,702 per month, and the median value of a home is $472,900. In Mount Pleasant, the median age is 40.9 years, with men being, on average, 38.7 years old and women 42.7 years old.

The service sector and port shipping are the two main economic drivers in Mount Pleasant. Mount Pleasant is becoming a popular location for technology and office-related businesses to locate their operations. Of the nearby cities, Mount Pleasant's average annual job growth from 2010 to 2019 was 5.2%. Great long-term plans are in place for Mount Pleasant. Mount Pleasant was recently ranked among the best 75 American cities to live in by Money Magazine.

Top Attractions In Mount Pleasant

One of the country's oldest active plantations, Boone Hall Plantation, dates back at least three centuries to the 1680s. Since 1956, the plantation has been operating as a living history facility and has continuously raised crops for over 320 years. The plantation welcomes visitors for special occasions like the Boone Hall Farms Market and the yearly Lowcountry Strawberry Festival, in addition to guided home tours.

The majority of the town's neighborhoods, including Coleman Boulevard, are traversed by this small creek before it empties into Cooper River. Even though the creek isn't very long, the banks make for one of the ideal locations for some peaceful outdoor activities. You can locate dining establishments and sites along the creek. At the end of it, there is a boardwalk and a covered area where you may relax and go fishing.

The first bridge connecting Sullivan's Island and Mount Pleasant was constructed in 1898. When the Ben Sawyer Bridge, the present access point to the island, was built, the old bridge was closed.

The 2.3-acre Patriots Point Cold War Submarine Memorial is close to Mount Pleasant's Charleston Harbor. A full-sized replica of a Benjamin Franklin Class Fleet Ballistic Missile submarine, which was instrumental in South Carolina's participation in the Cold War in the middle of the 20th century, sits atop the memorial. It preserves pieces of the USS Lewis and Clark SSBN 664 submarines. The memorial also serves as a homage to those who operated submarine ballistic missiles and served in submarines throughout the battle.

This 945-acre nature-focused park was designed with families and groups in mind above everything else. It has a tropical setting with boardwalks and bike trails. You can cook great meals while relaxing here in the picnic area, which features a grill. A water park is another option for you and your friends to cool off during the summer.

In addition to being close to Charleston, Mount Pleasant also exudes a vibrant charm. This wonderful town has a lot to offer, from its historical significance to its scenic beauty. If you're planning a trip, think about visiting Mount Pleasant.

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