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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in St. George, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in St. George, SC

2nd-largest Mega Millions jackpot set for Friday the 13th

ST. GEORGE — While many consider Friday the 13th an unlucky day, it has been rewarding for Mega Millions’ players over the years, with six previous jackpots won on such a day.There’s a chance for another this Friday, and it’s a big one, according to a ...

ST. GEORGE — While many consider Friday the 13th an unlucky day, it has been rewarding for Mega Millions’ players over the years, with six previous jackpots won on such a day.

There’s a chance for another this Friday, and it’s a big one, according to a news release issued Wednesday by Mega Millions. After no ticket matched all six numbers drawn Tuesday night – the white balls 7, 13, 14, 15 and 18, plus the gold Mega Ball 9 – a gigantic prize of $1.35 billion ($707.9 million cash) is estimated for Friday, Jan. 13. If won at that amount, it would be the second largest jackpot in Mega Millions history.

“The jackpot has rolled again, keeping everyone who follows Mega Millions in suspense for yet another drawing,” said Ohio Lottery Director Pat McDonald, who also serves as the lead director of the Mega Millions Consortium. “Now at $1.35 billion, the Mega Millions jackpot is moving up and making history as the second highest Mega Millions jackpot ever. Our member lotteries raise funds for many good causes, ranging from education to conservation programs. We’re proud to support these efforts.”

Michigan has been particularly lucky with Mega Millions jackpots on Friday the 13th, winning four of them (June 2008, May 2011, June 2014 and October 2017). That 2017 jackpot was shared with a winner in Rhode Island. Other jackpots on Friday the 13th have been won in New York (March 2009) and Ohio (November 2015). None of them, however, came close in size to the estimated $1.35 billion up for grabs later this week.

The only Mega Millions jackpot larger than Friday’s estimated prize is the game record of $1.537 billion, won in South Carolina on Oct. 23, 2018.

The Tuesday drawing produced riches throughout the non-jackpot prize tiers; there were a total of 6,154,167 winning tickets at all prize levels ranging from $2 to $3 million. Sixteen tickets from coast to coast matched the five white balls to win the game’s second-tier prize.

Three of them, one each in Connecticut, Florida and New York, included the optional Megaplier (available in most states with an extra $1 purchase), which tripled Tuesday night; those tickets are worth $3 million each.

The other 13 second-tier winning tickets are worth the standard $1 million each; they were sold in California, Florida, Kansas, Massachusetts (two), Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio (two), Oregon, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Across the country, 215 tickets matched four white balls plus the Mega Ball to win the game’s third-tier prize. Forty-one of those tickets are worth $30,000 each, because they also included the optional Megaplier. The other 174 third-tier winning tickets are worth $10,000 each.

There have been a total of almost 33.3 million winning tickets sold in the 25 drawings since the jackpot was last won on October 14. These include 68 worth $1 million or more, won in 24 different states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.

The most recent Mega Millions jackpot win was at $502 million, shared by winning tickets in California and Florida last Oct. 14.

The top Mega Millions jackpots to date:

Amount Date Winning Tickets
$1.537 billion 10/23/2018 1-SC
$1.350 billion (est) 1/13/2023 ?
$1.337 billion 7/29/2022 1-IL
$1.050 billion 1/22/2021 1-MI
$656 million 3/30/2012 3-IL, KS, MD
$648 million 12/17/2013 2-CA, GA
$543 million 7/24/2018 1-CA
$536 million 7/8/2016 1-IN
$533 million 3/30/2018 1-NJ
$522 million 6/7/2019 1-CA

Community News: Christmas tree pickup in Fairfield to benefit charity

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigateInaugural Fairfield exhibition features realist paintersThe George Billis Gallery, at 1700 Post Road in Fairfield, has kicked off its inaugural Fairfield exhibition featuring three realist painters.It is free and open to the public during regular business hours and runs through Feb. 25. The show features the art of Jeffrey Vaughn, Leslie Lewis Sigler and John Aquilino.For additional information, visit the gallery’s website at GeorgeBillis.com or ...

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Inaugural Fairfield exhibition features realist painters

The George Billis Gallery, at 1700 Post Road in Fairfield, has kicked off its inaugural Fairfield exhibition featuring three realist painters.

It is free and open to the public during regular business hours and runs through Feb. 25. The show features the art of Jeffrey Vaughn, Leslie Lewis Sigler and John Aquilino.

For additional information, visit the gallery’s website at GeorgeBillis.com or contact the gallery at gallery@georgebillis.com or 203-557-9130.

Youth orchestra receives $10,000 grant

The Greater Connecticut Youth Orchestras has been approved by the National Endowment for the Arts to receive a Challenge America award of $10,000. This grant will provide funding to GCTYO to continue its work on breaking down barriers to entry into the youth orchestra organization and facilitating paths to success for children from communities that have been historically excluded from classical music and high quality music education.

The grant is one of 262 Challenge America awards totaling $2.62 million that were announced by the NEA as part of its first round of fiscal year 2023 grants.

Visit gctyo.org for more information about Greater Connecticut Youth Orchestras.

Visit arts.gov/news for more information on other projects included in the NEA’s grant announcement.

Library to screen "The Street Project"

The documentary, "The Street Project," will be screened on Jan. 19 at Fairfield Library in the Rotary Room, at 1080 Old Post Road.

It will be followed by a community discussion with a panel of local and regional guests involved in safe streets advocacy across the state. The free event runs from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and is open to the public. It will be rescheduled to Jan. 26 if there is inclement weather.

The 52-minute documentary is about the global, citizen-led fight to make streets safer. It was produced and directed by Connective native, Jennifer Boyd, who has produced and directed more than 25 documentaries, nine of which have won Emmy awards.

The film screening is presented by the Fairfield Public Library, with the Stratfield Village Association and Bird Scooters.

It comes as 2022 was one of the deadliest on record for fatalities involving motor vehicles and pedestrians and/or cyclists.

People can register through the library's website.

Fairfield receives AAA rating

Fairfield has received another AAA rating from Moody’s Investors Services and S&P Global Ratings, First Selectwoman Brenda Kupchick announced in her year-end letter.

Last year, the town held a bond refunding sale with a principal refunding amount of nearly $13.46 million. Bond refinancings or “refundings” are used by local governments most frequently to achieve debt service savings on outstanding bonds. The town was able to refinance bonds issued at higher rates in 2012 and 2014. The timing of the refunding resulted in better-than-expected savings and exceeded industry standards. The refunding allowed the town to reduce its debt by more than $740,000 over the 12-year refunding period, Kupchick said.

Town Clerk receives grant to digitize records

The Town Clerk’s Office received a $7,500 grant from the State Library Historic Documents Preservation Program that was used to add several more years of land records to the existing online search database.

Library doubles visitation

Officials reported 274,424 visits to Fairfield Library in 2022, 110 percent more than 2021.

The figure was included in an end of year recap that mentioned the library's signature annual program, One Book, One Town, was hugely successful with the author talk by TJ Klune drawing 375 patrons to the SHU Theater and another 131 people online.

In 2022, the library opened new study rooms at the main branch and have been reserved 6,613 times for academic or business use. The library also purchased upgraded furniture for the main library’s adult section and the Woods Branch teen area.

There were 2,520 summer reading challenge participants. There was also the return of regular art shows returned in the Bruce Kershner Gallery, First Friday Jazz, Storytime on the Green, and the full reopening of the children's room.

Tree pickup to benefit charity

Ruscito's Trees is again collecting Christmas trees, this time alongside nonperishable food donations. Last year's collection raised more than $1,000 for Operation Hope.

Trees will be picked up through Jan. 16 and dropped off to WeCare Denali for mulch compost and topsoil.

For more information, call or text 203-767-1582, or email Paul@Ruscitoresolutions.com.

Americares names Fairfield resident senior vice president and chief medical officer

Julie Varughese, of Fairfield, has been promoted to senior vice president of programs and chief medical officer for Americares.

Varughese now oversees the organization’s health programs for people affected by poverty or disaster, including its work with the uninsured in the United States, its Emergency Response Team and its global distribution of more than $1 billion in medicine and medical supplies to an average of 85 countries annually.

She also oversees Americares primary care clinics in Colombia, El Salvador, India and Connecticut, as well as the team of medical experts that reviews offers of donated products from pharmaceutical and medical supply companies to ensure items are used safely and effectively by the organization’s health care partners around the world.

Varughese had been serving as interim senior vice president and chief program officer since August. From 2018 to 2022 she served as vice president of Americares technical unit and chief medical officer.

She joined Americares in 2015 as a member of its medical team, and previously served as a clinical infectious disease attending physician at Norwalk Hospital and worked in Norwalk Community Health Center’s HIV clinic. She has participated in a number of medical trips abroad.

Varughese earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., and a medical degree from Rush University in Chicago, where she completed her residency training. She completed her infectious disease fellowship at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, N.Y. She is trained in a dual internal medicine-pediatrics residency program and maintains board certification in internal medicine and infectious diseases.

Fairfield U. receives grant for STEM

Fairfield University is among the winners of Constellation’s E2 Energy to Educate grant program, receiving a $25,000 grant for hands-on STEM activities.

Fairfield's program, SuSTEMability, trains more than 20 undergraduate engineering and science students to mentor 500 K-12 students and 12 STEM educators from urban Connecticut schools. It focuses on STEM education and hands-on activities using real-world issues about environmentally sound and sustainable energy sources.

Twenty Fairfield undergraduate students and their faculty mentors visit each community partner ten times, for a total of 20 classroom sessions. Participants unite at a day-long event on Fairfield's campus and the program culminates with a teacher professional development workshop.

DHEC and VCOM Partnership Offers Free Health Screenings, Vaccinations at Mobile Medical Clinics

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:SPARTANBURG, S.C. ? The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is teaming up with the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine-Carolinas (VCOM) to provide important health screenings and vaccinations to residents in the upstate at no cost.These mobile medical clinics will offer screenings for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and blood sugar and blood pressure measurements, as well as vaccinations for flu and COVID-19. STD screening appointments can be scheduled by callin...

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

SPARTANBURG, S.C. ? The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is teaming up with the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine-Carolinas (VCOM) to provide important health screenings and vaccinations to residents in the upstate at no cost.

These mobile medical clinics will offer screenings for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and blood sugar and blood pressure measurements, as well as vaccinations for flu and COVID-19. STD screening appointments can be scheduled by calling DHEC’s Care Line at 1-855-472-3432. However, walk-ins are welcome for all services. No identification or insurance cards are necessary to receive these free services.

“With the use of VCOM’s Mobile Medical Unit, we’re able to bring important health services into the community and make it incredibly easy and convenient for people to take a few minutes out of their day to do something important for their own health,” said Dr. Kandi Fredere, DHEC’s Upstate Region Health Director. “Partnerships like the one we have with VCOM are essential to DHEC’s mission of supporting healthy people in healthy communities.”

The mobile medical clinics will be held from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., except for the Jan. 28 clinic, at these locations and dates:

“VCOM is honored to partner with DHEC in this important effort,” said Alexis M. Stoner, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor, Discipline Chair for Preventive Medicine and Public Health at VCOM. “As a member of the Spartanburg Community, we are committed to helping improve the health and well-being of those in the Upstate Region and surrounding areas. We hope our mobile unit program can serve those most in need of preventive and supportive services.”

VCOM is an osteopathic medical school with a mission to prepare globally-minded, community-focused physicians to meet the needs of rural and medically underserved populations and promote research to improve human health. Many VCOM graduates pursue primary care residencies to meet the needs of people in nearby communities and greater Appalachian and Delta Regions. Learn more about the college at www.vcom.edu.

DHEC recently launched its Bridge Strategic Plan for 2022-2024. DHEC’s partnership with VCOM aligns with the agency’s strategic goal of partnering with stakeholders and communities to promote and protect healthy people and environments. It also aligns with the agency’s strategic goal of promoting healthy outcomes by improving access to safe, quality health care services for all.

For more information about the services offered at DHEC health departments in every county in the state, or to use the agency’s online Webchat feature to make an appointment, visit scdhec.gov/healthclinics.

Media Relations

The best albums of 2022 from outside the state, as selected by SC music writers

Bartees Strange - “Farm to Table”Strange was supposed to play The Senate this spring before a rash of COVID-19 cases shutdown headlining act Car Seat Headrest, and it might be the last time he’s ever in such an unheralded slot again. A fascinating indie rock figure who uses a hodgepodge of post-punk guitars, trap beats and bars, Midwest emoisms, and haunted indie folk balladry to create his own indelible sound, there’s truly nothing like Bartees Strange. “Farm to Table,” his sophomore LP, cashes i...

Bartees Strange - “Farm to Table”

Strange was supposed to play The Senate this spring before a rash of COVID-19 cases shutdown headlining act Car Seat Headrest, and it might be the last time he’s ever in such an unheralded slot again. A fascinating indie rock figure who uses a hodgepodge of post-punk guitars, trap beats and bars, Midwest emoisms, and haunted indie folk balladry to create his own indelible sound, there’s truly nothing like Bartees Strange. “Farm to Table,” his sophomore LP, cashes in on all the promises of his 2020 debut and then some. KYLE PETERSEN

Anna Ash - “Sleeper”

While Anna Ash’s 2016 album “Floodlights” will forever be my favorite (I still listen to it religiously), this year’s “Sleeper” pulled me in with its soft, seductive trance and kept me intrigued with eventful inflections. Ash’s vocals are a one-of-a-kind wailing wonder in themselves, and while the instrumentation seems more stripped back in places, there is a subtle power and something mesmerizing about the restraint. Opening track “Favorite Part” might fittingly be my favorite part of the whole record, but don’t skip over organ-tinted “Seasonal” or steel guitar-highlighted “I Was Just Your Evening.” Close the curtains on 2022 with “Dress Rehearsal” and then reflect upon, alongside a sweet piano serenade, “What the Light Can Do” in 2023. KALYN OYER

Black Country, New Road - “Ants From Up There”

The English outfit Black Country, New Road was a new discovery for me this year and came at a dramatic turn for the group. The formerly seven-person rock band released its album “Ants From Up There” in January, but only days before the release, lead vocalist Isaac Wood left the group for mental health reasons. The strongly intimate album was constructed during COVID-19, and the biting emotions it derives from that era can be felt keenly. Almost every track stretches on far past typical 3-minute-and-30-second length and reaches dramatic, emphatic moments that affected me strongly. DAVID CLAREY

Metric - “Formentera”

Metric goes for broke on the opener of “Formentera,” unleashing a dynamic 10-minute monster called “Doomscroller.” The song makes a play to be Metric’s “Stairway To Heaven,” storming through in insistent fashion but never abandoning the reliable electronic-rock sound that Metric has spent much of the last two decades building on. “Doomscroller” might throw other albums off balance, but the band shines through on the rest of the album, most notably the hit single “All Comes Crashing.” VINCENT HARRIS

Goose - “Dripfield”

Jam band studio records are supposed to be a punchline, but there’s never really been a jam band quite like Goose. While the long shadow of the Grateful Dead and Phish are quite apparent, so too is the song-first emphasis of indie rock and folk groups from the 2000/2010s like Bon Iver, Fleet Foxes and Vampire Weekend. Add in a dash of trippy pop via Tame Impala and intricate Radiohead-style studio trickery, you have a record that really doesn’t need the “jam” tag to explain itself. KYLE PETERSEN

The 1975 - “Being Funny in a Foreign Language”

“Part of the Band” was the radio hit of the year that truly caught my attention and kept it. It’s a standout from The 1975’s October album “Being Funny in a Foreign Language,” a disc that delivers unabashed love songs amidst a feel-good symphony. Jack Antonoff (who has helped produce Taylor Swift, Lorde and Lana Del Rey, among others) dips his hat in this one, too. The result is extremely well-produced excess instrumentals that savor the sap and bathe in purposefully sentimental shmaltz, from slinky sax to pop synth hooks that will make you believe in (and get excited about) true love again. KALYN OYER

Aoife O’Donovan - “Age of Apathy”

An illustrious songwriter and performer since her days in the newgrass group Crooked Still, Aoife O’Donovan is known as much for her many collaborations (Nickel Creek, Alison Krauss, Yo Yo Ma, Kronos Quartet, etc.) as she is for her excellent solo record. Hopefully that changed a bit with “Age of Apathy,” a record replete with character studies, travelogues and subtle explorations of emotional terrain so convincingly great that quoting Joni Mitchell in a song comes across less as hubris and more as inheritance. KYLE PETERSEN

Rachika Nayar - “Heaven Comes Crashing”

Brooklyn-based musician Rachika Nayar’s follow up to her debut full length album “Our Hands Against The Dusk” is a lush and cinematic soundscape of 10 tracks (and one remix) that blend into each other. The album is primarily led by Nayar’s guitar playing, but here electronic production pairs as a strong collaborator. Together, Nayar creates musical landscapes, where the highs and lows of the album can be nearly felt physically. DAVID CLAREY

Toro Y Moi - “MAHAL”

Does this one even count, since Toro Y Moi is technically from South Carolina? The ex-Palmetto Stater who now lives out in Los Angeles crosses genres seamlessly, everything connecting through a chillwave electronic pulse. “MAHAL” leans into psychedelia with a series of shoegaze segments, jazzy jaunts, R&B rendezvous and funk forays, leaving a trail of tantalizingly creative, groovy morsels throughout. There’s not one crumb that tastes alike, and yet it’s one of the best cookies you’ll eat all year. KALYN OYER

Kendell Marvel - “Come On Sunshine”

There’s something refreshing about pure Outlaw country delivered with zero f*cks given, and that’s exactly what Kendell Marvel does on “Come On Sunshine.” Kicking off with the anthemic “Don’t Tell Me How To Drink” (which features a helping hand from Chris Stapleton), “Come On Sunshine” is veteran Nashville songwriter Marvel’s musical statement of purpose. You get the country, the real country and nothin’ but the country from start to finish, with just enough rock and roll grit to satisfy all comers. VINCENT HARRIS

The Beatles - “Revolver” (reissue)

This just in: The Beatles were really good. The Giles Martin-helmed remix of their 1966 classic “Revolver” reveals just HOW good they were. You can hear the brilliance in every track now more than ever, and this remix points out just how valuable Paul McCartney was to the musical lightning in a bottle that The Beatles captured. Listen to his absolutely ridiculous bass line on George Harrison’s “Taxman,” or to McCartney’s own pop artistry on “Eleanor Rigby” or “Got To Get You Into My Life.” Sure, John Lennon’s “Tomorrow Never Knows” is the best song on the album, but this remix is a testimony to McCartney’s power as a writer and an instrumentalist. Ringo’s not bad, either. VINCENT HARRIS

His Eminence Metropolitan Dimitrios of Xanthos Elevated

HIS EMINENCE METROPOLITAN DIMITRIOS OF XANTHOS ELEVATEDOn January 10, 2023 at the suggestion of His All-Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, the Holy and Sacred Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate elevated His Grace Bishop Dimitrios of Xanthos to the rank of Metropolitan and, as such, the see of Xanthos to the rank of Metropolis in his person.Upon the news of the elevation of Bishop Dimitrios of Xanthos to Metropolitan, His Eminence Archbishop Elpidophoros of America called Metropolitan Dimitrios in order to congratula...

HIS EMINENCE METROPOLITAN DIMITRIOS OF XANTHOS ELEVATED

On January 10, 2023 at the suggestion of His All-Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, the Holy and Sacred Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate elevated His Grace Bishop Dimitrios of Xanthos to the rank of Metropolitan and, as such, the see of Xanthos to the rank of Metropolis in his person.

Upon the news of the elevation of Bishop Dimitrios of Xanthos to Metropolitan, His Eminence Archbishop Elpidophoros of America called Metropolitan Dimitrios in order to congratulate him on his elevation. Archbishop Elpidophoros expressed his wholehearted congratulations for this great honor and wished the newly-elevated Metropolitan much health, success, and dynamism from above in the year ahead. In response, His Eminence Metropolitan Dimitrios of Xanthos said, “I am deeply humbled and grateful to His All-Holiness and to the Members of the Holy and Sacred Synod for this elevation. It is an honor that I pray to be found worthy of.”

His Eminence Metropolitan Dimitrios (Couchell) of Xanthos was born in 1938 in Greenville, South Carolina. He graduated from Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology in 1963 and thereafter continued studies at Yale Divinity School before being invited to join the staff of the Archdiocese in New York City and charged by His Eminence Archbishop Iakovos to establish a national Campus Ministry program for Orthodox college students.

Dimitrios Couchell was elected in 1977 to serve as President of Syndesmos, which was headquarter in Helsinki, Finland. After receiving the blessing of Ecumenical Patriarch Dimitrios, he traveled to many countries establishing contact with Orthodox young people. His term concluded in 1980 with the first World Orthodox Youth Festival, hosted by the Orthodox Monastery in Valamo, Finland. Archbishop Paul of Finland invested him as a member of the Order of the Holy Lamb, of the Orthodox Church of Finland.

In 1981, Archbishop Iakovos appointed him as the Executive Director of the St. Photios National Shrine in St. Augustine, FL. In 1983, he was ordained to the Diaconate and to the Priesthood. Fr. Dimitrios was elevated to the rank of Archimandrite in 1985. While serving the Shrine, he was asked to assume, also, responsibility for the Foreign Mission efforts of the Archdiocese. Two years later this became the Orthodox Christian Mission Center, an inter-Orthodox ministry under the umbrella of SCOBA.

In 1998, Fr. Dimitrios was elected Bishop of Xanthos by the Holy and Sacred Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. Following his ordination to the episcopacy at the St. George Cathedral in Philadelphia, PA, Bishop Dimitrios was called to return to the Archdiocese in New York City, where he served as an auxiliary bishop to Archbishop Spyridon and then to Archbishop Demetrios. He was appointed Ecumenical Officer, responsible for the Inter-Orthodox, Inter-Christian and Inter-faith relations of the Archdiocese. At the same time, he served as General Secretary of SCOBA while also serving on the Executive Committee of the NCCC, on various committees of the WCC, and on the Board of the New York City Council of Churches.

In 1999, he was appointed by His All-Holiness Patriarch Bartholomew to the delegation representing the Ecumenical Patriarchate at the meeting with Pope John Paul II for the Patronal Feastday of Sts. Peter & Paul.

In his 60 years of ministry to the Church, he has played a major role in the founding and nurturing of several Archdiocesan and inter-Orthodox ministries still active today including, but not limited to, being a founder of the OCF (Orthodox Christian Fellowship), founding editor of the Orthodox Observer, founding Executive Director of the St. Photios National Shrine, and founding Director of the OCMC (Orthodox Christian Mission Center).

Following 43 years of service to the Sacred Archdiocese, Bishop Dimitrios retired in December 2007, but he has continued to stay active at the Holy Trinity parish in St. Augustine, FL.

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