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Kitchen Countertops North Charleston, SC

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If you're in need of a professional, fast, reliable company for kitchen cabinets, countertops, and remodels, look no further than Stone City Kitchen & Bath.

Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in North Charleston, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in North Charleston, SC

North Charleston hires new coordinator to help homeless

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) — The City of North Charleston has hired a new homeless coordinator to address the needs of the city’s growing homeless population.In this newly created role, Brandon Lilienthal will be working with city staff to provide assistance to homeless individuals and strengthen partnerships between agencies and organizations that work on homelessness issues, according to the City of North Charleston’s ...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) — The City of North Charleston has hired a new homeless coordinator to address the needs of the city’s growing homeless population.

In this newly created role, Brandon Lilienthal will be working with city staff to provide assistance to homeless individuals and strengthen partnerships between agencies and organizations that work on homelessness issues, according to the City of North Charleston’s website.

“My goal is to listen to these individuals and figure out what they want. And then, get them connected with those services to help them transition from homelessness, or to the next phase in their life,” Lilienthal said in a promotional video.

Lilienthal said he grew up in downtown Charleston and previously oversaw the Charleston/Dorchester Mental Health Center.

“They see a lot of programs come through. A lot of individuals say they want to help, and just show up a one time, and you don’t see them anymore — my goal is being consistent,” he said.

In addition to becoming a “familiar face” to North Charleston’s homeless population, Lilienthal hopes his background in psychology will help him build trust in the community.

“It can be very depressing for some individuals,” Lilienthal said. “Eventually, you keep knocking at the door, somebody’s going to let you in. That’s my philosophy.”

According to the new coordinator, a typical day in this role involves visiting encampments, listening to homeless individuals express their needs and making sure they get connected with available resources.

“Connecting them with mental health services, with the Charleston Center…connecting them with the Hope Center, the Navigation Center – connecting them with different partners, that’s my goal,” he said.

As of January 2020, the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness estimated over 4,000 individuals experienced homelessness in South Carolina on any given day.

Local nonprofit Neighbors Together works to provide resources for North Charleston’s homeless individuals. Leaders of the organization said they have witnessed the increase of homelessness firsthand.

“With the inflation on the rise, we have seen an increase of folks at risk for homelessness — and of families, that are falling into homelessness, because there are no options for them,” said Kara Stewart, executive director of Neighbors Together.

Stewart said homelessness in North Charleston has worsened over the “arc of COVID,” adding that missing work due to quarantining for the virus is a contributing factor for many.

“What we’re seeing is those who are already on the edge, who are already paying paycheck to paycheck — if they’re out for a week or two weeks with continuing symptoms, that really wreaks havoc on their family’s budget,” she said.

She said the organization has also seen an increasing number of single mothers come in for help — an emerging trend amidst the overall growth.

“The face of homelessness is single moms, and I think that’s something our entire community needs to pay attention to,” Stewart said as she described how four women had visited the Neighbors Together office in North Charleston for help just hours before.

She added that one of the women was pregnant and facing an eviction notice in effect that day — breaking down in tears when she heard the organization could gather their resources to help.

Stewart said stories like this showcase homelessness is on the rise in North Charleston, and she hopes to see an “increased acceptance” of the fact that it is a worsening issue from the city going forward.

For more information on Neighbors Together, click here.

Cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina

(Stacker) — Stacker compiled a list of cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina using data from Zillow. Cities are ranked by the Zillow Home Values Index for all homes as of June 2022.The charts in this story were created autom...

(Stacker) — Stacker compiled a list of cities with the most expensive homes in South Carolina using data from Zillow. Cities are ranked by the Zillow Home Values Index for all homes as of June 2022.

The charts in this story were created automatically using Matplotlib. The most expensive city on the list has a typical home value of $3,402,190 which is 1,067% higher than the state average of $291,591.

Metros with the most cities in the top 30 in South Carolina#1. Charleston-North Charleston: 13#2. Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort: 5#3. Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia: 3#3. Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach: 3#5. Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin: 2#6. Columbia: 1#6. Georgetown: 1#6. Seneca: 1

Read on to see which cities made the list.

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#30. Townville

– Typical home value: $398,576– 1-year price change: +29.4%– 5-year price change: +71.2%– Metro area: Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin

#29. North Myrtle Beach

– Typical home value: $399,767– 1-year price change: +39.6%– 5-year price change: +78.7%– Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach

#28. Clover

– Typical home value: $411,130– 1-year price change: +31.6%– 5-year price change: +73.2%– Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia

#27. Chapin

– Typical home value: $428,079– 1-year price change: +27.2%– 5-year price change: +54.0%– Metro area: Columbia

#26. Saint Helena Island

– Typical home value: $440,933– 1-year price change: +43.8%– 5-year price change: +69.0%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

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#25. Pinopolis

– Typical home value: $453,978– 1-year price change: +20.4%– 5-year price change: +68.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#24. Bluffton

– Typical home value: $463,177– 1-year price change: +37.4%– 5-year price change: +68.7%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

#23. Hollywood

– Typical home value: $464,342– 1-year price change: +27.5%– 5-year price change: +66.5%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#22. Surfside Beach

– Typical home value: $472,480– 1-year price change: +38.0%– 5-year price change: +80.7%– Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach

#21. Pawleys Island

– Typical home value: $480,203– 1-year price change: +29.3%– 5-year price change: +57.0%– Metro area: Georgetown

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#20. Salem

– Typical home value: $496,349– 1-year price change: +33.7%– 5-year price change: +79.7%– Metro area: Seneca

#19. Ravenel

– Typical home value: $502,597– 1-year price change: +27.9%– 5-year price change: +80.4%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#18. Fort Mill

– Typical home value: $505,368– 1-year price change: +31.9%– 5-year price change: +68.9%– Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia

#17. Charleston

– Typical home value: $520,311– 1-year price change: +30.3%– 5-year price change: +64.2%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#16. Tega Cay

– Typical home value: $553,959– 1-year price change: +30.6%– 5-year price change: +83.2%– Metro area: Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia

#15. Edisto Beach

– Typical home value: $581,239– 1-year price change: +20.6%– 5-year price change: +47.6%– Metro area: not in a metro area

#14. Wadmalaw Island

– Typical home value: $626,506– 1-year price change: +27.9%– 5-year price change: +64.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#13. Awendaw

– Typical home value: $632,803– 1-year price change: +23.6%– 5-year price change: +52.9%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#12. Okatie

– Typical home value: $638,747– 1-year price change: +36.7%– 5-year price change: +63.1%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

#11. Meggett

– Typical home value: $715,588– 1-year price change: +28.1%– 5-year price change: +57.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

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#10. Mount Pleasant

– Typical home value: $747,165– 1-year price change: +32.8%– 5-year price change: +61.2%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#9. Hilton Head Island

– Typical home value: $748,547– 1-year price change: +40.9%– 5-year price change: +80.2%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

#8. Seabrook Island

– Typical home value: $862,369– 1-year price change: +39.5%– 5-year price change: +72.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#7. Briarcliffe Acres

– Typical home value: $889,330– 1-year price change: +40.7%– 5-year price change: +89.9%– Metro area: Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach

#6. Sunset

– Typical home value: $1,198,759– 1-year price change: +35.2%– 5-year price change: +65.5%– Metro area: Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin

#5. Folly Beach

– Typical home value: $1,378,103– 1-year price change: +45.0%– 5-year price change: +89.3%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#4. Isle of Palms

– Typical home value: $1,612,539– 1-year price change: +47.8%– 5-year price change: +88.4%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#3. Kiawah Island

– Typical home value: $1,794,143– 1-year price change: +41.2%– 5-year price change: +63.0%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

#2. Sheldon

– Typical home value: $2,488,888– 1-year price change: +36.8%– 5-year price change: +54.1%– Metro area: Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort

#1. Sullivans Island

– Typical home value: $3,402,190– 1-year price change: +35.8%– 5-year price change: +91.5%– Metro area: Charleston-North Charleston

Copyright 2022 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

N. Charleston flooding costs family thousands in damages, city cleaning

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Heavy rains and flooding have cost one North Charleston family thousands of dollars in repairs. They say their whole street suffers from consistent water damage, and they want to see the city make changes to the drainage system.Jesus Mori and his wife have lived in their house on Ranger Drive since 2007. He says the flooding has cost them thousands of dollars out of pocket in damages.“We have a lot of problems with the furniture; we replaced the carpet the first time it got wet,” Mori...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Heavy rains and flooding have cost one North Charleston family thousands of dollars in repairs. They say their whole street suffers from consistent water damage, and they want to see the city make changes to the drainage system.

Jesus Mori and his wife have lived in their house on Ranger Drive since 2007. He says the flooding has cost them thousands of dollars out of pocket in damages.

“We have a lot of problems with the furniture; we replaced the carpet the first time it got wet,” Mori says. “I said we have to fix it with tile. The problem is cleaning up everything, replacing the kitchen cabinets.”

They have replaced flooring, cabinets and their air conditioning unit twice in the past 15 years, all from water damage.

“After a year there was a lot of rain, and a lot of water was going under the house,” Mori says.

The couple replaced an AC unit with water damage under the house for more than $3,000 soon after they moved in. Only a few years later, they say the flooding again caused so much damage they needed to replace the unit. This time, they say they spent $8,000 to put the system equipment in the attic.

He says the couple used to have flood insurance but after a few years the rates got so high, that they couldn’t afford to keep it and ended up paying for repairs out of pocket. Mori says the street fills with water too.

“No cars can drive in the street because the water is too high,” Mori says. “But the neighbors know, this time we decided we have too much damage and paid too much money. My neighbor says he’s called to the city too. The city says the last days had many calls with the same problems.”

North Charleston spokesperson Ryan Johnson says the Public Works department has had 24 work orders for Ranger Drive, just in the month of July, for drainage-related issues. All have been completed but five.

He says debris in the drains is the main culprit, and the city is working to clear them out. He reminds people to be mindful of littering and leaving garbage out, saying that will help in the future once the city clears the pipes.

“I wish this time it is fixed for the final time because it is a lot of trouble,” Mori says. He says the city told him workers will be in the neighborhood for the rest of the week finishing work orders and looking into the drainage system.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

North Charleston chemical maker Ingevity plans $325M buyout

Ingevity Corp. is making its third major acquisition by agreeing to pay $325 million to buy a manufacturer of pavement products.The North Charleston-based global chemical maker announced Aug. 2 it plans to purchase privately held Ozark Materials LLC and an affiliated transportation business in an all-cash transaction.The deal requires regulatory approvalIngevity said it expects to finalize the purchase by early fall and fold the Greenville, Ala.-based company into its performance chemicals unit, which already makes aspha...

Ingevity Corp. is making its third major acquisition by agreeing to pay $325 million to buy a manufacturer of pavement products.

The North Charleston-based global chemical maker announced Aug. 2 it plans to purchase privately held Ozark Materials LLC and an affiliated transportation business in an all-cash transaction.

The deal requires regulatory approval

Ingevity said it expects to finalize the purchase by early fall and fold the Greenville, Ala.-based company into its performance chemicals unit, which already makes asphalt additives.

"Today’s announcement represents an important step for Ingevity, strengthening our position in the paving construction industry while moving us one step downstream where we can better serve our end customers," CEO John Fortson said in a written statement.

Ozark Materials was described as "a leading producer of pavement marking materials," such as paints for striping and heavy-duty thermoplastic reflectors. Its customers in the U.S. and Canada include public transportation agencies, roadwork contractors, local governments, universities and airports.

The company has four manufacturing sites and a distribution center. The sale includes Red Oak, Texas-based Ozark Logistics LLC, which operates a fleet of delivery vehicles.

Fortson said the businesses are expected "to continue to benefit from several macro-level tailwinds, including increased infrastructure spending and the need for more road markings to support autonomous vehicles."

Ingevity expects Ozark to generate $150 million annually in revenue and contribute immediately to its bottom line.

The deal marks the O'Hear Avenue specialty chemical company's second-largest and third major acquisition since 2016, when it was spun off by paper giant WestRock.

Ingevity, which is listed on the New York Stock Exchange, previously paid $675 million for a U.K. manufacturer and $300 million for a chemical business that had been owned by Georgia-Pacific Corp.

The company also announced financial results Tuesday, reporting that its second-quarter revenue jumped 17 percent to $420 million as it raised prices "to help offset ongoing inflationary cost pressures." Net income surged more than one-third to $59.8 million compared to the April-June period of 2021.

Management will discuss the results and the Ozark deal with investors during a webcast starting at 10 a.m. Wednesday.

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North Charleston commissary kitchen now home to nearly 50 F&B businesses

NORTH CHARLESTON — Restaurant-inside-a-restaurant businesses known as ghost kitchens swept the nation amid the COVID-19 pandemic, but in Charleston few have risen.Instead, another ghost kitchen has become a household name for food and beverage industry professionals looking for commercial kitchen space to launch their food truck, pop-up or meal delivery service.A year and a half into its tenure at 3555 Dorchester Road, Ghost Kitchen Commissary has g...

NORTH CHARLESTON — Restaurant-inside-a-restaurant businesses known as ghost kitchens swept the nation amid the COVID-19 pandemic, but in Charleston few have risen.

Instead, another ghost kitchen has become a household name for food and beverage industry professionals looking for commercial kitchen space to launch their food truck, pop-up or meal delivery service.

A year and a half into its tenure at 3555 Dorchester Road, Ghost Kitchen Commissary has grown its list of tenants — referred to as licensees — to 45. Each food and beverage business has access to one of 10 cooking stations equipped with burners, ovens, grills, griddles and fryers, among other amenities.

Parking and plug-ins for 20 food trucks is situated in a fenced-in lot near the entrance to the building.

Ghost Kitchen operates with a guiding hand from owner Steve Wenger and manager Stephan Hughes, its only employee. Licensees can schedule stations via Ghost Kitchen’s software, which also collects monthly payments.

“They can walk in here and there’s just a very low barrier to entry for a new business,” Wenger said. “My mission in life right now is to support small businesses.”

Wenger brings decades of experience to the commissary kitchen. In 1991, he purchased Stephen Duvall & Associates Catering from its original owners and remained at its head until selling the company to Dave Byron in 2018. During Wenger’s tenure, Duvall was inducted into the Leading Caterers of America, a prestigious industry group.

Caterers and businesses renting space can utilize Wenger’s consulting services for an extra fee, and those who are accepted into the Ghost Kitchen Grant Program will receive a $1,000 startup credit.

Several notable food trucks, caterers and meal delivery services call Ghost Kitchen home, including Atlyss Food Co., Sarah’s Dumps and DIY Thai, a local company providing home cooking kits. Those who order from DIY Thai and Atlyss can even pick up their food right at Ghost Kitchen.

“The thing that really keeps it working is that everybody cleans behind themselves in a professional way,” Wenger said. “Everybody takes really good care of things.”

Ghost Kitchen has room for 10 to 15 more businesses, said Wenger, who recently added another freezer to the commissary kitchen. Those looking to lease space can apply online.

Wenger said an actual ghost kitchen — meaning a takeout or delivery restaurant without its own brick-and-mortar space — could successfully operate inside Ghost Kitchen, and he would welcome the opportunity to help this type of business grow.

Charleston restaurants like Daps Breakfast & Imbibe have launched ghost kitchens inside their own four walls, but that’s about as far as the ghost kitchen concept has gone in the Holy City, aside from a handful of celebrity-owned virtual operations.

In the upstate, at least one Columbia ghost kitchen — The Bodega Kitchen — has found success. Owned by Aida and Hector Sanchez, The Bodega Kitchen operates out of Krab Kingz Seafood after growing out of its ghost kitchen space inside the Philly Pretzel Factory on Rosewood Drive.

The restaurant serves New York-style street food like Neapolitan-style pizza with made-from-scratch dough topped with ricotta cheese and chopped cheese, a sandwich born in New York that features ground beef and onions topped with melted cheese. The pair both grew up in New York but Hector has spent most of his life in South Carolina.

“I heard about the ghost kitchen concept that’s already really popular in New York and Cali and different parts of the United States,” Aida Sanchez said. “We found a place and absolutely outgrew it within three months because of the influx of people.”

According to Aida Sanchez, running a ghost kitchen gives the couple time to learn more about the restaurant business without the crippling overhead that comes with a brick-and-mortar location.

They plan to continue testing out their concept with the goal of opening a physical restaurant in the next two years.

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