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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Nexton, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Nexton, SC

Berkeley voters pass 2 referendums to fund roads, schools

MONCKS CORNER — Voters approved two separate 1 percent sales taxes to pay for infrastructure and school construction projects in rapidly developing Berkeley County.The infrastructure tax, which will be collected by the county, passed with 74 percent of the vote. The education capital improvements tax, which will be collected by the Berkeley County School District, passed with 71 percent of the vote.The infrastructure tax is a continuation of a seven-year tax voters first approved in 2008 to pay for road improvements throu...

MONCKS CORNER — Voters approved two separate 1 percent sales taxes to pay for infrastructure and school construction projects in rapidly developing Berkeley County.

The infrastructure tax, which will be collected by the county, passed with 74 percent of the vote. The education capital improvements tax, which will be collected by the Berkeley County School District, passed with 71 percent of the vote.

The infrastructure tax is a continuation of a seven-year tax voters first approved in 2008 to pay for road improvements throughout the county. Officials have touted the completion of projects like Phase 1 of the widening on Clements Ferry Road as proof of the tax’s success.

The referendum also asked voters to approve $89 million in obligation bonds to pay for initial projects while the tax is first being collected. It will be repaid with money from the tax. Voters passed it with 71 percent of the vote.

The infrastructure tax will pay for a $74 million second phase of widening Clements Ferry on Daniel Island; two phases, each about $30.4 million, of widening Henry Brown Boulevard in Goose Creek; $58 million worth of widening and intersection improvements along Interstate 26 in the Jedburg area; and a $61 million widening project of U.S. Highway 176 between U.S. 17A and Nexton Parkway.

Ten percent of the money collected from the tax will go to preserve green space throughout the county. It received support from several conservation groups, including the Coastal Conservation League and the Conservation Voters of South Carolina.

“In poll after poll, voters say Berkeley County is growing too fast, leading to record losses of open space and wildlife habitat, polluting our rivers and lakes, and threatening our quality of life,” John Tynan, executive director of CVSC, said in a statement. “With today’s overwhelming YES vote on the transportation and greenspace referendum, Berkeley County voters sent a resounding message that they value their quality of life and the environment.”

The education capital projects is a new seven-year tax that will pay for three new schools, additions to four more and improvements to each of the high schools’ athletic facilities.

“I want to extend a heartfelt thank you to our community for their support and commitment to our students and schools,” said district Superintendent Deon Jackson in a statement Nov. 9. “Our students deserve first class facilities and ample space to learn. With this overwhelming vote in favor of the educational capital improvements referendum, we will get to work planning for and completing the projects as approved.”

The district is growing by as many as 1,000 students a year as more people move into developments like Nexton, Carnes Crossroads and Cane Bay.

District officials have said they will look into other ways to fund the capital projects if the referendum does not pass.

Rotary rails over I-26 expansion roundabouts

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.Wood, a construction service...

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.

During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.

Wood, a construction services project manager for the HDR design firm of North Charleston, led off the PowerPoint overview by describing the multilayered roadwork as a “substantial” and “challenging” project aimed at expanding seven miles of the I-26 from mile marker 187 to mile marker 193. Further, the one-time Naval officer walked the audience through a summary of an interchange construction — in the form of a 192-foot bridge — at Ridgeville Road to promote better traffic flow.

The mere mention of the soon-to-be-built interchange set off a series of questions from multiple club members in attendance, with one Rotarian pointedly asking Wood to list the advantages— if any — of two roundabouts and/or traffic signal/signage alternatives near the Walmart storage facility.

The civil engineer offered that the tight circular roundabout structures serve the purpose of adding a constant flow of traffic that — he estimated — works well with mid-level conditions of highway car travel.

“In other words, this isn’t high volume yet, so it keeps traffic moving under mid-level volumes of traffic,” detailed Wood, who reminded listeners that he is neither the design engineer nor a DOT authority who selected the roundabout method.

A fellow PE in the room questioned the functionality and purpose of roundabouts and the difficulties that they would present to regular drivers in light of the preponderance of large trucks that would traversing the make-shift, circular junction.

Wood explained that the roundabouts would be large enough to handle trucks coming from the Walmart site. He also mentioned how the curving of the circling structures would allow the trucks to navigate the roundabouts, while pointing out that the surrounding concrete would be sturdy enough to withstand the weight of the large vehicles.

Roundabouts are nothing new and have, in fact, been in existence for over 100 years, according to reports. However, their usage hasn’t always garnered public support due to instances where cars entering the traffic circle wind up frequently having the right-of-way over cars that are already in that same circle.

Other traditional cons concerning the viability of roundabouts stem from driver uncertainty about yielding, the overabundance of merge points, driver speed, motorists who try to cut the roundabout and cyclist/pedestrian shoulder lanes that are sometimes deemed as too narrow, potentially endangering those parties.

Wood’s description of the work continued with his narration of project elements regarding the construction of the S-32 Cypress Campground Road Bridge and the new I-26 bridge over Cypress Swamp.

The most formidable challenge of the DOT venture, he observed, is the installation of six box culverts (i.e. structural drainage that spans from one side of the road to the other).

“They’re substantial in size. You’re talking about this one here is a 287-foot, triple-barrel, 10′ x 9′ box culvert across the highway, so I mean, I hope it would be adequate to prevent situations like what you’re talking about,” said Wood in response to a Rotarian’s recollection of the addition of the 1-26 negatively impacting and/or impeding the backflow of area waterways.

“I would think that the new systems would be larger than the existing [ones] to handle these larger rain events. You make me want to check that when I go back, but rarely do you ever go smaller for a box culvert or any drainage component,” replied Wood.

In closing, the presenter maintained that the DOT is doing a fine job of planning ahead in reference to three future bill packages impacting the I-26, U.S. Highway 176 and South Carolina Highway 187.

Other details communicated by Wood pertaining the 1-26 widening and new interchange/bridge construction included a Nov. 30, 2026 contract completion date, as Banks Construction of North Charleston has been hired to handle the labor-and-materials aspect of the project.

“In summary, I’d just like to say that the I-26, mile marker 187 is a major component to the South Carolina transportation planning, which supports the local growth by improving the essential freight corridor essentially out of Charleston with all the port activities and with Walmart, Volvo and other companies moving in,” concluded the married father of three, who has previously managed over $200 million of construction in the Lowcountry.

Terwilliger Pappas Opens Solis Nexton in Summerville, SC

Leading Southeast Multifamily Developer Delivers on Newest Luxury Solis-Branded Property, Solis NextonSUMMERVILLE, S.C., July 21, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Terwilliger Pappas, one of the Southeast’s premier multifamily property developers, is nearing completion on Solis Nexton, adding to its roster of 32 complete properties. Under th...

Leading Southeast Multifamily Developer Delivers on Newest Luxury Solis-Branded Property, Solis Nexton

SUMMERVILLE, S.C., July 21, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Terwilliger Pappas, one of the Southeast’s premier multifamily property developers, is nearing completion on Solis Nexton, adding to its roster of 32 complete properties. Under the company’s marquee Solis brand, the newest property features 320 apartment homes in the Nexton neighborhood of Summerville. The project team includes Summit Contracting, Group 4 Architecture, Cline Design Associates, Seamon Whiteside and management company, Lincoln Property Company.

Welcoming home its first residents on July 29th, Solis Nexton offers contemporary finishes such as granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, custom kitchen islands with sleek shaker-style cabinetry and modern hardware. Solis Nexton’s extensive amenity list includes a saltwater pool, expansive fitness center and yoga studio, local hot and cold brew coffee on tap, community dog park and pet spa, and a business center brimming with work from home opportunities. The community is located just steps from Nexton Square, placing residents moments from Nexton’s premier attractions such as Hall’s Chophouse, Taco Boy, Poogan’s Porch, and Page’s Okra Grill.

“Solis Nexton will provide our residents the full complement of amenities found in all of our Solis communities while honing in on the signature neighborly spirit of Nexton,” said Tom Barker, Regional CEO of Terwilliger Pappas. “Positioned minutes from top employers, schools, conveniences, entertainment, and walkable to all the perks of Nexton Square, living at Solis Nexton puts residents at the pulse of the Nexton community, and we are excited and honored to be the newest addition to the neighborhood.”

Lincoln Property Company will serve as the management company and has already begun pre-leasing apartment homes at Solis Nexton. Lincoln currently manages 11 active communities in the Charleston area and is thrilled to be working with Terwilliger Pappas and the Nexton team on this project. “We are looking forward to welcoming the first members of the ‘inner circle’ here at Solis Nexton later this July,” said Danielle Lombardi, Business Manager at Solis Nexton. “This community is truly a place to enjoy the brighter moments and we’ve really perfected the resident experience to be one that is second to none in the Summerville submarket.”

To explore the collection of studios, one-, two- and three- bedroom offerings at Solis Nexton- visit: 6000 Front Street | Summerville, SC 29486 or call to schedule your tour today: (854) 300-4913. You may also visit the community online and explore virtual touring options at: www.solisnexton.com.

For more information on Terwilliger Pappas or its 32 properties, please visit www.terwilligerpappas.com.

About Terwilliger Pappas

Founded in 2013 by J. Ronald Terwilliger and Peter A. Pappas, Terwilliger Pappas develops best-in-class multifamily apartment communities in the Southeast’s most appealing submarkets. Terwilliger Pappas communities are identified by their marquee brand, Solis, and reflect the company’s elevated design emphasis resulting in the highest quality communities for residents, investors, and partners. Terwilliger Pappas is based in Charlotte, with regional offices in Raleigh and Atlanta.

About Solis Nexton

Solis Nexton is a vibrant community in the heart of the award winning, master- planned Nexton community. Enjoy our contemporary aesthetic, ideal amenities, and neighborly atmosphere while just steps away from renowned restaurants, shopping, and entertainment. At Solis Nexton, you’ll live a bit brighter. Welcome home.

About Lincoln Property Company

Lincoln Property Company was founded in 1965 by Mack Pogue as a builder and operator of high-quality residential communities. Headquartered in Dallas, Lincoln focuses on real estate investment, construction and development, in addition to property management. In 2019, Lincoln Property Company’s residential division formed a strategic partnership with Cadillac Fairview (CF), a globally focused owner, operator, investor, and developer of best-in-class retail, office, residential, industrial and mixed-use assets. Wholly owned by the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan, CF manages in excess of $36 billion of assets across the Americas, Asia, and the United Kingdom, with further expansion planned into Europe. Lincoln is currently the second largest multifamily manager in the United States with more than 210,000 units under management. For more information about Lincoln Property Company, please visit www.lincolnapts.com/business-services.

Media Contact:Tom BarkerTerwilliger Pappastbarker@terwilligerpappas.com919-585-5191

Nearly half of home buyers in Berkeley County’s megadevelopments are from out of state

If it seems like parts of Berkeley County are being invaded by new out-of-state residents, you’re only halfway wrong — or correct.Almost half of new home buyers in Nexton and Carnes Crossroads — two of the most flocked-to master-planned communities in the Charleston region — are coming from places beyond South Carolina’s borders.In 2021, this group represented 47 percent of purchasers in Nexton and Carnes Crossroads. The other 53 percent came from within the Palmetto State, with 70 percent of those...

If it seems like parts of Berkeley County are being invaded by new out-of-state residents, you’re only halfway wrong — or correct.

Almost half of new home buyers in Nexton and Carnes Crossroads — two of the most flocked-to master-planned communities in the Charleston region — are coming from places beyond South Carolina’s borders.

In 2021, this group represented 47 percent of purchasers in Nexton and Carnes Crossroads. The other 53 percent came from within the Palmetto State, with 70 percent of those originating from inside the Charleston area, according to data provided by the developers.

“It’s been that way from the beginning,” said Nexton spokeswoman Cassie Cataline. “Since we’ve opened, the percentage has been about the same – 50-to-60 percent of the buyers have come from South Carolina and the rest from out-of-state. I don’t know if it’s a price-point thing or what.”

The 5,000-acre Nexton property is expected to put about 7,000 homes on the ground with a population of about 17,500 at full buildout over the next decade. Over roughly the same period, the nearby 2,300-acre Carnes Crossroads development could have about 4,500 homes with more than 11,000 residents.

A common misconception among Lowcountry residents is that the majority of buyers are moving from either the Northeast corridor or Ohio.

“No, we are not being invaded by people from Ohio,” Cataline said with a chuckle.

Last year, the largest percentage of out-of-state buyers in Nexton moved in from North Carolina and Georgia, specifically from the Charlotte and Atlanta metropolitan areas.

The other top referring states were New York, Virginia and Pennsylvania as those buyers were made up primarily of retirees.

“It’s not just the home itself anymore that’s important,” said Roni Haskell, a realtor with Keller Williams, who has sold more than two dozen homes in the two mixed-use mega-developments. “Yes, the home and affordability are huge factors, but it’s also the neighborhoods now. More and more buyers are looking for the master-planned communities — what I’d call macro-communities — like Nexton and Carnes Crossroads.

“They don’t want to feel isolated; they want to feel like they are in the heart of things, but they don’t want have to go too far to get that lifestyle,” she added. “They want a community feel.”

Nearly 85 percent of buyers in Nexton were made up of either baby boomers or millennials, although there was a smaller percentage of younger buyers as well.

• 49 percent are boomers.

• 36 percent are millennials.

• 15 percent are gen-Xers.

Caroline Ayres, 29, grew up in the Hilton Head Island area and had been living in an apartment in Summerville with husband, Lee, since 2018. The couple wanted more space and went in search of a home in early 2020, finally settling on a property in Nexton’s Brighton Park.

“Everything is super convenient and anything we need is about 10 minutes away,” she said. “Summerville is close by, and we can hop on the interstate and get to downtown Charleston pretty quickly. There’s a lot to do, some great restaurants, some great walking trails, there’s green space, we have a dog park near our house, so everything we need is right here. Those factors were huge for us when we were making our decision on where to buy.”

Tucker Martinelli, 61, was stationed at the Navy base in the early 1980s and was familiar with the area. When his wife, Elizabeth, retired as a school teacher in the summer of 2020, the Charlotte coupled moved to Carnes Crossroads.

“South Carolina is a retirement-friendly state with some of its tax policies,” Martinelli said. “I knew the Summerville-Goose Creek area pretty well. We looked at some homes in the Del Webb section of Nexton, but we fell in love with Carnes Crossroads. We’re still pretty active, so we like to get out and do things. That’s very important for us.”

Ayers said the mix of families in her Brighton Park neighborhood offers a unique generational blend.

“We have young families with kids and without kids and also some retired folks,” Ayers said. “I think it’s an interesting mix because most neighborhoods are normally either young families or an older crowd. Nexton offers a little bit of everything to every generation and that gives it a real community feel.”

Nexton sold 576 homes during 2021, giving the community a total of 2,000 sales. At the end of 2021, Nexton had 1,675 occupied homes and another 250 sold and under construction, with 1,258 completed apartments and 602 under development, Cataline said.

Carnes Crossroads had 480 completed homes in 2021 with 57 under construction, 42 in the planning and approval stage and 823 apartments on the ground, said spokeswoman Julie Dombrowski of DI Development Co., the development manager for the project.

Cane Bay, another large housing development in that area of Berkeley County, did not respond to a request for comment.

Editorial: Berkeley’s elected leaders haven’t made a good case for a 1% school sales tax

Berkeley County voters might be doing the smart thing in the coming weeks if they cast their ballots in favor of a new 1% sales tax that would last seven years and provide their school district with new revenue to build three new schools, upgrade a few others and improve athletic facilities. Or not. Frankly, it’s hard for us to say either way.We’re distressed and saddened at the lack of public information and discussion in the run-up to this important choice, even as we acknowledge that local media have done little to make...

Berkeley County voters might be doing the smart thing in the coming weeks if they cast their ballots in favor of a new 1% sales tax that would last seven years and provide their school district with new revenue to build three new schools, upgrade a few others and improve athletic facilities. Or not. Frankly, it’s hard for us to say either way.

We’re distressed and saddened at the lack of public information and discussion in the run-up to this important choice, even as we acknowledge that local media have done little to make clear the pros and cons. But as far as we can tell, they haven’t overlooked any forums or news conferences held on the issue, either. There’s been no visible sign of any campaigning, period.

And that’s too bad. It’s primarily incumbent on elected leaders and their supporters in the wider business and civic communities to make their case on votes like these to help ensure success. That’s what Berkeley County Supervisor Johnny Cribb has been doing for the other 1% sales tax referendum on this fall’s ballot, a transportation and greenbelt proposal that we enthusiastically endorsed a week ago.

Requests for more information from district officials have produced a single URL for a website with the bare-bones information, including a link to the Aug. 9 meeting video in which school board members, after about 15 minutes of discussion, voted to put the 1% sales tax question on the ballot. During that meeting, Chairman David Barrow said community meetings were forthcoming before the vote, adding, “We’ll do our best to make sure we provide data and information to the public to provide them the information they need to make the best decision for themselves and for their families.” We haven’t seen any sign of anything like that. Perhaps voters have, but we somehow doubt it.

Maybe that’s because district officials think the ballot question says it all. It asks if a 1% sales tax must be imposed in the county for not more than seven years to raise money for three new schools — one each in the Nexton area (K-8), the Jedburg area (K-5) and the U.S. Highway 52 corridor (K-8); renovations to Berkeley High, Cane Bay High, Goose Creek High and Hanahan Middle schools; and upgraded athletic facilities at those schools as well as at Cross High, Hanahan High, Stratford High, Timberland High and Philip Simmons High schools. However, anyone who visits the district’s website to learn more details about the projects will see only a brief message: “Additional information coming soon.”

Maybe it’s because district officials remember the sad saga that unfolded a decade ago, when the district’s 2012 Yes 4 Schools property tax referendum was followed by an investigation that ultimately led to two district officials, including the superintendent, pleading guilty to ethics charges and ultimately losing their jobs for campaigning on the job. While it’s clear that taxpayers’ dollars must not be spent to lobby on referendums such as these, that restriction does not prevent campaigning by elected school officials, who not only may but also should feel an obligation to speak out in favor of a referendum proposal they voted to put on the ballot.

Maybe it’s because school officials think voters understand that a similar sales tax has worked well to upgrade Charleston County’s schools. But before voters approved that sales tax, there was a lot of public politicking to raise awareness of what was at stake. Six former Charleston County School Board chairs publicly endorsed the tax, as did several nonprofits that work with children, and the mayors of Charleston, North Charleston and Mount Pleasant.

And that’s what has been missing here. We have been provided no sense of how much Berkeley County’s property tax rate might have to rise to raise the same amount of money as the sales tax; why the board settled on a seven-year time frame instead of something longer; whether its construction cost estimates still look good; what school projects, if any, were left off and why; whether the district’s federal COVID aid can help address its capital needs; or what kind of hardships local students can be expected to face if there’s a delay in the district’s capital building plan. There may be good answers to these questions; we just haven’t heard them.

Berkeley’s rapid population growth logically means its public schools (much like its road system) are struggling to keep pace. State law allows this type of school sales tax only in counties where accommodations tax collections have surpassed the $1 million mark, which Berkeley’s recently did. So this is the first general election in which Berkeley school officials have had the option to seek a sales tax increase for school building projects, rather than using property taxes as it has previously.

“We certainly don’t want to increase (property tax) millage, but we will build schools,” Mr. Borrow said at the Aug. 9 meeting. “It is incumbent on this board and whoever the board members might be in the near future.”

So we can’t recommend this referendum to voters. What we can say is that if Berkeley County voters do vote yes, that will be a remarkable showing of trust.

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