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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Mount Pleasant, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Mount Pleasant voters asked to approve property tax increase for parks, recreation

MOUNT PLEASANT — It’s been more than a decade since the town bought more than 120 acres for a future park. Now, voters are being asked to approve a property tax increase to make that park a reality.Most of the $50 million Mount Pleasant would borrow, if the park tax referendum were to pass in a town-wide vote Nov. 8, would be used to develop the site on Rifle Range Road, with an estimated $10 million going to other recreation projects.The town’s property tax would rise by 10 percent to pay off the borrowed mon...

MOUNT PLEASANT — It’s been more than a decade since the town bought more than 120 acres for a future park. Now, voters are being asked to approve a property tax increase to make that park a reality.

Most of the $50 million Mount Pleasant would borrow, if the park tax referendum were to pass in a town-wide vote Nov. 8, would be used to develop the site on Rifle Range Road, with an estimated $10 million going to other recreation projects.

The town’s property tax would rise by 10 percent to pay off the borrowed money plus interest. When the debt is paid off after 15 years the extra tax would end, according to advocates, although the referendum does not mention a time limit.

The impact on total property tax bills would be much smaller than a 10 percent increase because the town accounts for just a portion of those annual bills and the school district gets the largest share.

Most Town Council members — seven of nine — supported putting the referendum on the ballot and some are actively working to see it passed.

“We’re trying to create something for this generation and the next,” Councilman John Iacofano said. “I think it’s going to be tight, but I think it’s going to pass.”

Mayor Will Haynie and Councilwoman Brenda Corley are opposed.

“In bad economic times, not everyone can afford this,” said Haynie. “I’m out there letting people know why they ought to vote no.”

He said the town should rely on impact fees that apply to new home construction to fund growth-related needs for recreation projects. The most those fees could raise would be $1.68 million yearly by Haynie’s estimate and wouldn’t allow the town to borrow tens of millions to put plans in action.

“If the referendum is successful, we can begin building immediately,” Iacofano and Councilwoman G.M. Whitley wrote, urging support for the ballot question.

Plans for the park site include four large playing fields, tennis and pickleball courts, playgrounds, fishing piers, a disc golf course, trails, volleyball and basketball courts, a performance space and a multipurpose building.

“It will be the Central Park of Mount Pleasant,” then-Mayor Billy Swails said in 2010, when the town and county agreed to spend $20 million to buy the land.

Iacofano said that if the town had raised its property tax then, the town would have a park by now.

“I don’t know that people truly understand how inexpensive our taxes are in Mount Pleasant, considering the services received,” he said.

The referendum would put an estimated $40 million toward building the park. The remaining 20 percent of the money would go to renovations of the Park West pool building, improvements at the Mugsy Kerr tennis complex on Whipple Road, and bike/pedestrian trails. If any money is left, the town could use that to fund green space preservation.

So, just how much would taxes increase if the referendum were to pass?

The impact on any particular taxpayer would vary, because the property tax is based on the assessed value of real estate and vehicles. Even next-door homeowners with identical houses could see very different results, depending when they purchased their homes and what vehicles sit in the driveways.

For an owner-occupant with a house valued at $500,000 for tax purposes, passage of the referendum would mean an extra $80, plus the added tax on any vehicles.

If that same house were a rental property, the extra tax would be $120, because commercial properties are taxed at a 50 percent higher rate. Large businesses would see the greatest tax difference.

The last time the town put a recreation referendum on the ballot, in 2015, it was narrowly defeated. The town has planned to develop the park site since it was purchased in 2010, but has not developed a funding plan.

The town’s property is half the 245-acre site that was jointly purchased with Charleston County Parks and Recreation. The town’s portion is planned for more active recreation, with playing fields, pickleball courts and other amenities.

Some people, including Corley, have come to see the town-owned land as green space that should not be developed. In voting against holding a referendum, Corley expressed concern about the impact on wildlife.

Recreation advocates argue that the town has far too few playing fields to handle the current demand, and say most of the jointly owned site would remain undeveloped in any case.

A group called Vote for Parks — Mount Pleasant has put up a website (voteparks.org) advocating for the referendum. There appears to be no organized opposition, but a big hurdle for supporters will be overcoming the history of town voters opposing property tax increases, including the 2015 park referendum and the 2020 Charleston County affordable housing referendum.

Daniel Brownstein, who ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the statehouse against Joe Bustos in 2020, is representing that group. He said it’s being funded by “local citizens who want to ensure that children and adults have adequate parks and recreational amenities.”

Drum Island restoration part of SC ports agency’s effort to go green

From a waterfront spot on Charleston’s peninsula, Mark Messersmith says he can see all of the best the State Ports Authority has to offer.There are the breakbulk vessels loading cars at Columbus Street Terminal, with cargo containers arriving at the Leatherman Terminal farther north. Sandwiched between them is the Drum Island salt marsh, in the shadow of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge.“You look out and you can see commerce and you can see conservation — it’s all right there,” said Messersmith, the S...

From a waterfront spot on Charleston’s peninsula, Mark Messersmith says he can see all of the best the State Ports Authority has to offer.

There are the breakbulk vessels loading cars at Columbus Street Terminal, with cargo containers arriving at the Leatherman Terminal farther north. Sandwiched between them is the Drum Island salt marsh, in the shadow of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge.

“You look out and you can see commerce and you can see conservation — it’s all right there,” said Messersmith, the SPA’s permitting manager and the man in charge of the maritime agency’s environmental initiatives, such as restoration work on Drum Island. “It’s always been really neat to me since I started working here to see that.”

The creation of 22 acres of salt marsh on the southern end of Drum Island was part of the authority’s commitment to compensate for the destruction of 11 acres of wetlands during construction of the Leatherman Terminal, the Port of Charleston’s newest facility which opened in March 2021.

The SPA worked with Collins Engineers on the $4 million effort to restore what had been a dredge disposal site that hadn’t been used in decades. The island was in bad shape — the tip had eroded and the fringe of trees had fallen into the beach tide, according to a Post and Courier report.

“It was basically just sitting there with a lot of invasive species,” Messersmith said, adding that unwanted plants like phragmites, Chinese tallow and chinaberry had taken over much of the property.

After clearing and grubbing the land, the SPA planted more than 100,000 native marsh plants, such as spartina grass, to bring the island back to its natural state.

“We really did restore an old area that had dredge fill within it down to the elevations needed to support a viable marsh,” he said. “We think it adds significant value to the harbor because, rather than a fringing salt marsh and a contaminated Navy Base, now you have an uncontaminated salt marsh in the middle of Charleston Harbor that is so visible.”

The work has improved water quality and provided a nursery habitat for juvenile fish species and other marine life. Oyster reefs are being created annually along the island’s shoreline. And monitoring is taking place to gauge the restoration’s impact on air quality.

“Now we have an area that’s open to the tidal flow from the harbor, so the tide comes in and out and, certainly, it’s providing habitat just like any other tidal creek,” Messersmith said. “There’s plenty of invertebrates and fish that are going to be in and out of that creek.”

Messersmith is quick to point out that the restoration project took a lot of people willing to work together.

“Many people were involved — from our team, the contractors who did the work and our great environmental partners — in making this project a success,” he said.

The restoration won an engineering excellence award in 2020 from the American Council of Engineering Companies of South Carolina, which cited its complexity and benefits to the public and the environment. It was among the environmental projects that Barbara Melvin, the SPA’s president and CEO, highlighted during her State of the Port speech on Oct. 17.

“If you run, or even walk, the bridge, when you’re on that slow, never-ending incline going from Charleston to Mount Pleasant, just look to your right for some inspiration,” Melvin said of Drum Island, adding the project has created a thriving ecosystem for birds and wildlife.

Melvin also touted other SPA initiatives, such as partnering with environmental groups to preserve 3,000 acres of land in the state as well as investments in hybrid cranes and electric trucks to reduce the port’s carbon footprint. The SPA’s new rail yard under construction in North Charleston, for example, will feature electric-powered cranes and the agency has applied for federal grants that would pay for electric tugs and barges to move containers between Wando Welch Terminal in Mount Pleasant and the Leatherman site.

It is all part of the SPA’s “mission to become the greenest port in the Southeast,” Melvin said.

Hundreds of Navy sailors give back at Patriots Point

Hundreds of sailors from the Naval Nuclear Power Training Command in Charleston volunteered Friday at Patriots Point to help with nearly 20 projects.MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - Hundreds of sailors from the Naval Nuclear Power Training Command in Charleston volunteered Friday at Patriots Point to help with nearly 20 projects.For the ninth year in a row, 250 sailors helped to clean, pick up trash, paint and pressure wash the USS Yorktown, USS Laffey, and the Vietnam Experience Exhibition as part of the Trident United Way’...

Hundreds of sailors from the Naval Nuclear Power Training Command in Charleston volunteered Friday at Patriots Point to help with nearly 20 projects.

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) - Hundreds of sailors from the Naval Nuclear Power Training Command in Charleston volunteered Friday at Patriots Point to help with nearly 20 projects.

For the ninth year in a row, 250 sailors helped to clean, pick up trash, paint and pressure wash the USS Yorktown, USS Laffey, and the Vietnam Experience Exhibition as part of the Trident United Way’s Day of Caring.

Supervisor at the Naval Nuclear Power Training Command, Luke Wright, said helping on Friday is for the community and to actually get the young sailors out on a naval vessel.

“The public is always so grateful for what we do; so, it’s awesome to get a chance to say thank you. We appreciate your support, every time someone says thank you for your service,” Wright said. “It’s always gives us a chance to really say thank you for that support.”

Patriots Point is not the only Lowcountry location receiving help with almost 3,000 navy sailors helping at schools and other locations on Friday.

Chris Hauff, Patriots Point Director of Marketing & Communications, explained that their staff cannot complete the amount of work the ship needs, so having the extra hands is very helpful.

“We have a saying around here that ‘we stand a little taller and the ships are a little prouder when the Navy’s back on board,’” Hauff said. “We’re a bunch of civilians working here at the museum but on a day like this when the Navy’s back on board, it just makes us all real proud.”

Hauff further explained that the USS Yorktown used to have 2,000 men onboard daily to take care of the ship. Now, Patriots Point has a staff of 60 to 100 people at a given time to take care of maintenance.

“To be able to have them {the Navy] come aboard and give us their time, it saves us so much manpower and hours that we could put back in actual the museum and make exhibits for our visitors to learn more about the Navy,” Hauff said.

Patriots Point is open on weekdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and weekends from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

History Buffs: Book This Iconic Fort Sumter Tour In Charleston

The American Civil War stands out due to its impact and toll on the nation. The location of the start of America's most infamous war was Fort Sumter, which still remains today for travelers to visit and learn about the origins of this tragic war.History buffs will love the chance to explore the place, and the artifacts that remain, where the Civil War began in April 1861. Travelers will have the chance to hear accounts of t...

The American Civil War stands out due to its impact and toll on the nation. The location of the start of America's most infamous war was Fort Sumter, which still remains today for travelers to visit and learn about the origins of this tragic war.

History buffs will love the chance to explore the place, and the artifacts that remain, where the Civil War began in April 1861. Travelers will have the chance to hear accounts of the start of this war from Park Rangers, who will tell the story of the fort. Travelers will even have the chance to delve into the self-guided tour of the fort and its museum. This is a can’t-miss opportunity for travelers that love history.

Fort Sumter Admission And Self-Guided Tour With Roundtrip Ferry

Visiting the historic Fort Sumter in Charleston is a sought-after activity for many history buffs. At the sight of the battle which started the American Civil War, there is much to discover a Fort Sumter. This tour is provided by the sole operator of both round-trip ferry service and entry into the fort. The cruise to the fort is a charming 30-minute journey each way along Charleston Harbor. There are two convenient departure locations allowing travelers to pick the one that is best for them.

Travelers will not only be able to enjoy the fort but also the sight of sites like Liberty Square and Patriots Point. Upon arriving at the fort, travelers will be greeted by National Park Rangers, who will awe travelers with stories from America’s deadliest war before travelers begin their 1-hour self-guided tour of Fort Sumter National Monument.

Travelers should make sure to leave themselves enough time to stop by the museum, bookstore, and souvenir shop to pick up something to remember this adventure before returning to Mt. Pleasant of Charleston. This is a can’t-miss adventure for those fascinated by history.

Travelers can look forward to just about everything being included in their ticket. Admission to the historic Fort Sumter is, of course, included. The ferry ride, with the option of two different starting points, is included. The one-hour self-guided tour through Fort Sumter and its well-preserved ruins is included. The Narration from the National Park Rangers about the start of the war, the Fort Sumter Museum about the Civil War, the Bookstore, and the Souvenir Shop are also all part of the experience. Food, beverages, and gratuities are not included, though there will be beverages available for purchase.

Starting And Ending This Incredible Tour Of Fort Sumter

Travelers will have the option to start from two different meeting points. The ferry will make two stops; the travelers can choose whichever is more convenient for them to board and depart from, making this an incredibly accessible activity.

Travelers will have the choice of two meeting points for starting this adventure. The first is Downtown Charleston Square’s Fort Sumter Visitors Center which can be found at 340 Concord St., Charleston, SC 29401. The second location is Mt. Pleasant Patriots Point, 40 Patriots Point Road, Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464.

The ending point for this adventure will be the same as the selected starting point, so travelers can feel comfortable leaving their vehicles nearby to retrieve them later.

What To Expect On This Charleston Tour

Travelers will have much to look forward to on this incredible tour of Fort Sumter.

The primary stop during this tour, the historic Fort Sumter National Monument, offers an incredible chance to experience both the scenic ride to the fort and the well-preserved ruins of the Fort Sumter National Monument. Fort Sumter represents the beginning of the war that would cost the US more lives than any other war the country has partaken in. Travelers will discover an incredibly informative video that will take them around the fort. Travelers will also be able to look forward to exploring the fort’s museum and souvenir shop before departure.

Travelers will benefit from a stop at the Fort Sumter Visitor Education Center. This isn’t one of the locations that the ferry to the fort departs from; it is a great place to arrive a bit early, too, so travelers can glean a bit of extra information about the adventure they are about to take part in.

Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridges is one of the scenic locations travelers will pass on their way to the fort. The bridge is just one of the many sites travelers will be able to check out on their way to the fort.

Those arriving from Patriots Point should arrive a bit early, so they can check out the Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum. The museum is the perfect place for travelers to get into the mood for history, including views of the historic USS Yorktown Aircraft Carrier, before departing for Fort Sumter.

Fort Moultrie is actually multiple forts making a series along Sullivan’s Island. Travelers will have the chance to check out views of these forts as the ferry passes by them.

Travelers will even be able to catch sight of Batter homes during their cruise. The famous White Point Gardens are beautiful to see as travelers pass them on their ferry ride.

Blessing Offor Debuts Irresistible New Single “Feel Good”

Multi-week No. 1 Billboard artist Blessing Offor today released his latest track “Feel Good,” available on all digital streaming platforms. Infusing his own unique brand of funk, soul, and a dash of cheerful optimism, Blessing wears his heart on his sleeve on this sunny, upbeat tune. Blessing waxes on love, kinship, and a positive outlook that can make one feel invincible. Shades of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and George Clinton bubble to the forefront as Blessing comes out of the gates swinging, almost challenging the listener t...

Multi-week No. 1 Billboard artist Blessing Offor today released his latest track “Feel Good,” available on all digital streaming platforms. Infusing his own unique brand of funk, soul, and a dash of cheerful optimism, Blessing wears his heart on his sleeve on this sunny, upbeat tune. Blessing waxes on love, kinship, and a positive outlook that can make one feel invincible. Shades of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and George Clinton bubble to the forefront as Blessing comes out of the gates swinging, almost challenging the listener to dance like no one is watching. Listen to the upbeat “Feel Good” at the link HERE.

“‘Feel Good’ is three minutes of a nonstop party,” Blessing exclaims. “Growing up, soul and funk music took a hold of me and spoke directly to who I was and am. I consider this song a little nod to the P-Funk sound I love so much!”

Blessing kicks off the song with a memo to dance and bring the beat in, and once the groove is in place, the track rolls nonstop. “Get lost in the dreamin’ / Get found in the freedom / Yeah, that love we believe in / You give me that feel good feelin’.” With rich production, a bouncing backbeat, and Blessing’s effervescent vocal delivery, this track is sure to warm up the upcoming winter months. Watch the lyric video for “Feel Good” HERE.

Recently, Blessing made his debut on the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, eliciting a rapturous standing ovation from the crowd after the performance of “Tin Roof” and his Top 5 hit “Brighter Days.” Blessing’s full-length debut My Tribe – a 16-track love letter to his Nigerian roots and his unique journey to the heart of Music City and beyond – is available for preorder at the link HERE.

Blessing just finished performing on select dates with Lauren Daigle, and you can currently see him on tour with Brandon Lake later this year, and with Zach William in 2023 at the dates below:

With Brandon Lake

Nov. 18th – Bell Shoals Church – Brandon, FL

Nov. 19th – Christ’s Church – Jacksonville, FL

Nov. 20th – Seacoast Church Mount Pleasant – Mount Pleasant, SC

Nov. 22nd – Seacoast Church Mount Pleasant – Mount Pleasant, SC

With Zach Williams

Mar. 3rd – Knoxville Civic Auditorium – Knoxville, TN

Mar. 4th – Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium – Spartanburg, SC

Mar. 8th – Thalia Mara Hall – Jackson, MS

Mar. 9th – Jack Howard Theatre- Monroe, LA

Mar. 11th – Savannah Civic Center – Savannah, GA

Mar. 14th – Uptown Theater – Kansas City, MO

Mar. 15th – The Orpheum Theatre Memphis – Memphis, TN

Mar. 18th – Majestic Theatre – San Antonio, TX

Mar. 22nd – Kiva Auditorium at the Albuquerque Convention Center – Albuquerque, NM

Mar. 24th – Oxnard Performing Arts & Convention Center – Oxnard, CA

Mar. 25th – Warnors Theatre – Fresno, CA

Mar. 27th – City National Grove of Anaheim – Anaheim, CA

Mar. 31st – Reno Events Center – Reno, NV

Apr. 1st – Moda Center – Portland, OR

Apr. 13th – Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox – Spokane, WA

Apr. 14th – Paramount Theatre – Seattle, WA

Apr. 15th – Toyota Center – Kennewick, WA

Apr. 18th – Idaho Falls Civic Center for the Performing Arts – Idaho Falls, ID

Apr. 21st – Orpheum Theatre – Wichita, KS

Apr. 26th – Embassy Theatre – Fort Wayne, IN

Apr. 27th – Hobart Arena – Troy, OH

Apr. 28th – Adler Theatre – Davenport, IA

May 5th – Atlanta Symphony Hall – Atlanta, GA

May 6th – Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts – Greensboro, NC

May 9th – Juanita K. Hammons Hall – Springfield, MO

May 10th – Stifel Theatre – St. Louis, MO

May 12th – Old National Centre – Indianapolis, IN

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