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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Mount Pleasant, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Mount Pleasant, SC

Hospitals’ Use of Volunteer Staff Runs Risk of Skirting Labor Laws, Experts Say

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. — Most of the 30 volunteers who work at the 130-bed, for-profit East Cooper Medical Center spend their days assisting surgical patients — the scope of their duties extending far beyond those of candy stripers, baby cuddlers, and gift shop clerks.In fact, one-third of the volunteers at the Tenet Healthcare-owned hospital are retired nurses who check people in for surgery or escort patients to a preoperative room, said Jan Ledbetter, president of the hospital’s nonprofit Volunteer Services Organiza...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. — Most of the 30 volunteers who work at the 130-bed, for-profit East Cooper Medical Center spend their days assisting surgical patients — the scope of their duties extending far beyond those of candy stripers, baby cuddlers, and gift shop clerks.

In fact, one-third of the volunteers at the Tenet Healthcare-owned hospital are retired nurses who check people in for surgery or escort patients to a preoperative room, said Jan Ledbetter, president of the hospital’s nonprofit Volunteer Services Organization. Others relay important information from hospital staffers to expectant families. “They’re kept extremely busy,” Ledbetter said. “We need to have four of those volunteers a day.”

At hospitals across the U.S., volunteers play an integral role. So much so that when volunteers were barred from East Cooper at the beginning of the covid-19 pandemic, staff nurses assumed the volunteers’ duties in the surgical waiting room. Like paid employees, hospital volunteers typically face mandatory vaccine requirements, background checks, and patient privacy training. And their duties often entail working in regular shifts.

At HCA Healthcare, the world’s largest for-profit hospital system, volunteers includeaspiring medical providers who work in patient rooms, in labs, and in wound care units, according to the company’s magazine.

Over centuries, leaning on volunteers in medicine has become so embedded in hospital culture that studies show they yield meaningful cost savings and can improve patient satisfaction — seemingly a win-win for hospital systems and the public.

Except, there’s a catch.

The U.S. health system benefits from potentially more than $5 billion in free volunteer labor annually, a KHN analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Independent Sector found. Yet some labor experts argue that using hospital volunteers, particularly at for-profit institutions, provides an opportunity for facilities to run afoul of federal rules, create exploitative arrangements, and deprive employees of paid work amid a larger fight for fair wages.

The federal government instructs that any person performing a task of “consequential economic benefit” for a for-profit entity is entitled to wages and overtime pay. That means profit-generating businesses, like banks and grocery stores, must pay for labor. A Chick-fil-A franchise in North Carolina was recently found guilty of violating minimum wage laws after paying people in meal vouchers instead of wages to direct traffic, according to a Department of Labor citation.

Still, volunteer labor at for-profit hospitals is commonplace and unchecked.

“The rules are pretty clear, and yet it happens all the time,” said Marcia McCormick, a lawyer who co-directs the Wefel Center for Employment Law at Saint Louis University. “It’s a confusing state of affairs.”

In a statement, HCA spokesperson Harlow Sumerford said coordinators oversee hospital volunteers to ensure they are participating in appropriate activities, such as greeting and assisting visitors. Tenet Health spokesperson Valerie Burrow did not respond to a question about how the company ensures that its volunteer activities comply with federal labor laws.

Ben Teicher, a spokesperson for the American Hospital Association, whose members include more than 6,000 nonprofit, for-profit, and government hospitals, did not respond to a question about whether the organization offers guidance to hospitals regarding the legal uses of volunteers.

Meanwhile, the pandemic made the importance of hospital volunteers more apparent. In March 2020, volunteer programs nationwide were largely disbanded, and the volunteers’ roles were filled by staff members — or left unfilled — when hospitals closed their doors to everyone except employees, patients, and a few visitors. Volunteers were welcomed back once vaccines became widely available, but many didn’t return.

“We’ve lost so many volunteers,” said Ledbetter, who runs the volunteer group at East Cooper Medical Center. “They found something else to do.”

On South Carolina’s Hilton Head Island, Vicki Gorbett, president of the island’s hospital auxiliary, estimated 60% of the group’s volunteers who left during the pandemic haven’t returned. Much larger hospital systems, some of which boast hundreds or thousands of volunteers, have been affected, too.

“We’re building back from the absolute bottom,” said Kelly Hedges, who manages volunteers at the Medical University of South Carolina.

Hedges was furloughed for the better part of six months when hospital volunteers were sent home in March 2020. She estimates there are about 600 volunteers at MUSC’s hospital campus in Charleston now, down from 700 before the pandemic.

“During a labor crisis, this is a department you want in operation,” she said.

While hospital volunteer programs reboot across the country, labor experts say using volunteers may expose some medical facilities to liability.

The Fair Labor Standards Act prohibits “employees” — defined broadly as people an employer “requires or allows” to work — from volunteering their time to for-profit private employers. The same law also requires these employees to be paid no less than the federal minimum wage.

These regulations make it “very, very difficult” for a volunteer to donate time to a for-profit hospital, explained Jenna Bedsole, an employment attorney in Birmingham, Alabama.

The right to be paid isn’t waivable, McCormick said, meaning that even those volunteers who don’t consider themselves employed may be entitled to compensation. However, the U.S. Department of Labor is “stretched pretty thin” and doesn’t enforce the rules that apply to for-profit companies, except in extreme circumstances, she said.

She cited a court ruling in 2017 that found people who volunteered at consignment events for Rhea Lana — a for-profit company that organizes the resale of children’s clothing — were employees who should be paid.

But in most cases, McCormick said, it is difficult to determine the outcome of enforcement actions against for-profit companies.

“The Department of Labor sends a letter to the putative employer warning them that it thinks the FLSA is being violated,” she said, “and it may not take any other action. And it only issues news releases for big cases.”

Companies are more likely to be targeted for the inappropriate use of unpaid interns, she said.

But this isn’t to say that, in some cases, individuals can’t donate their time in a for-profit setting. In a for-profit nursing home, the federal government has said, people may volunteer without pay if they’re attending “to the comfort of nursing home residents in a manner not otherwise provided by the facility.” That might include reading to a resident, for example.

One-off charitable opportunities are also possible. A choir group could host a concert in a hospital lobby without violating the law, or a community organization could serve hospital staffers an appreciation lunch.

Beyond that, for-profit “hospitals potentially expose themselves to risk of civil liability,” Bedsole said, which could add up in terms of back pay due to employees, fines, and legal fees. If hospital volunteers provide essential services, there is a danger they could be held liable, she said.

Nonprofit hospitals must follow federal labor laws, too.

At the small, nonprofit Baptist Memorial Hospital-Leake in Carthage, Mississippi, the coordinator of volunteers, Michelle McCann, can’t use a volunteer in any role that matches an employee’s job description. She said she’s also prohibited from asking a hospital employee who is off the clock to volunteer their time for a job similar to their own.

“We’d have to pay them for the hours,” said McCann, national president of the Society of Healthcare Volunteer Leaders.

Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide a benefit to their communities, such as offering charity care, in exchange for their special tax status. But when it comes to making money, the differences between for-profit and nonprofit hospitals are often negligible to the casual observer, said Femida Handy, a professor of social policy at the University of Pennsylvania.

“When you go to the hospital, do you ask for the tax status?” she asked.

Sam Fankuchen, CEO of Golden, a company that develops software used to organize volunteer labor, said the pandemic hastened a change in public opinion. “Just because an organization is nonprofit, it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re 100% dedicated to the greater good,” he said. “Some nonprofits are better run than others.”

Most volunteers are simply trying to figure out how and where they can help in the best possible way, he said.

“The consideration about the tax structure is secondary,” said Fankuchen, whose software is used by hospitals and other businesses. “The big picture is that hospitals exist to deliver care. I think it’s reasonable that they have volunteer programs.”

Jay Johnson, support services manager at Trident Medical Center in North Charleston, South Carolina, coordinates roughly 50 volunteers who contribute an estimated 133,000 hours annually to the for-profit hospital, which is owned by HCA Healthcare.

Trident’s volunteers are widely beloved by the staff, he said.

“We actually had a ceremony for them when they came back” when restrictions loosened, Johnson said. Beyond that, volunteers benefit from premium parking spaces and free lunches “to really make sure they’re appreciated,” he said.

Trident volunteers are required to be vaccinated and undergo a background check. Then, they are assigned to the areas that best match their interests.

Breast cancer survivor Pat LoPresti for example, volunteers in Trident’s Breast Care Center. Volunteering provides a sense of purpose and an opportunity to socialize, said LoPresti, a retiree who met her husband, another volunteer, while volunteering at the hospital.

“I started volunteering there because they could use me,” LoPresti said. “It’s such a privilege to help people in a time when they need it.”

FIRE SAFETY: Using a space heater in cold temperatures

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. — Safety experts are reminding people across the Lowcountry as temperatures drop this week, the risk of home fires goes up.According to local leaders at the American Red Cross, the organization responds to more home fires during the winter compared to the rest of the year.“The winter is our big concern, because you have the issues with space heaters, you have people with fires in their fireplaces,” said Brint Patrick, executive director of the Lowcountry American Red Cross chapter. “...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. — Safety experts are reminding people across the Lowcountry as temperatures drop this week, the risk of home fires goes up.

According to local leaders at the American Red Cross, the organization responds to more home fires during the winter compared to the rest of the year.

“The winter is our big concern, because you have the issues with space heaters, you have people with fires in their fireplaces,” said Brint Patrick, executive director of the Lowcountry American Red Cross chapter. “There’s just additional risks that happen in the winter that don’t happen other times of the year.”

Storm Team 2 predicts morning low temperatures could be near freezing by the weekend, so if you plan to use a space heater, experts offer a few tips to keep your family safe.

First, safety experts said space heaters need just that — space. Keep the device about a yard from anything that can burn, including furniture, bedding, carpets, rugs, curtains and jackets.

Children and pets should also be kept away from space heaters, Patrick said.

Space heaters should never be left unattended, and should be unplugged before anyone leaves a room or falls asleep, Patrick said.

According to the Red Cross, space heaters should be plugged directly into an outlet, not an extension cord. Check to see if the cord is worn, broken or loose — if it is, either repair or replace it.

Patrick also reminds people across the Lowcountry to test their fire alarms in the winter months.

“Having a working smoke alarm that can make you aware of that, if for some reason you were in the other room, is very important,” Patrick said.

Plus, every family should have an emergency escape plan. In the case of a fire, every family member — regardless of age — should know where to meet, Patrick said.

The reminder comes as the Red Cross assists a family in Summerville Thursday whose home was damaged by a fire that occurred late Wednesday night.

Disaster trained volunteers helped provide financial assistance for needs like food, clothing and shelter, in addition to referrals for resources, to two people impacted by the fire, according to a press release.

For more information on the Palmetto SC Region of the American Red Cross, click here.

Town’s recent hire tasked with bringing more jobs, housing to Mount Pleasant

It’s no secret that business is booming in Mount Pleasant, with ribbon-cutting and groundbreaking ceremonies happening left and right. The Town of Mount Pleasant recently hired Matt Brady as the new economic development manager at the start of November. It will be his responsibility to support business growth and development in the town.Brady is the first and only person in the municipality focused solely on economic development, a role that was previously the job of several town staff members, with no one dedicated to the job f...

It’s no secret that business is booming in Mount Pleasant, with ribbon-cutting and groundbreaking ceremonies happening left and right. The Town of Mount Pleasant recently hired Matt Brady as the new economic development manager at the start of November. It will be his responsibility to support business growth and development in the town.

Brady is the first and only person in the municipality focused solely on economic development, a role that was previously the job of several town staff members, with no one dedicated to the job full-time. Before this role, he worked as the economic development director for the City of Goose Creek for five years and was the first person to serve the city in that role, too.

“With Matt and his talent working this strategy every day, we hope that it’s going to make Mount Pleasant an even more dynamic place to live and do business,” said Mount Pleasant Town Administrator Eric DeMoura. “The business community is of extreme importance to us and we want to do everything we can to support it.”

Brady will be responsible for implementing the key needs of the town as identified by the economic development strategy, developed by third-party consulting firm SB Friedman earlier this year.

At the top of the list was attainable housing, and attracting and attaining good, high-paying jobs. According to the economic development strategy, only 26% of town residents work within Mount Pleasant.

“One of the simplest definitions of economic development is wealth creation distributed equitably. That’s what we want to do. It’s a cliché, but a ‘rising tide lifts all boats,’” Brady said. “We want people who have to leave town to work their job to be able to slash the commute and work at a wonderful, good-paying, good benefits firm right here in town.”

The undeveloped Faison Road property, purchased by the Town for roughly $6.5 million in 2021, has been at the center of the attainable housing question. A handful of firms submitted plans for the property in September, a majority of them including plans for attainable housing units. Brady will be the town’s “chief representative” in selecting a group or firm to develop the property, DeMoura said.

The project has not yet been awarded to a firm, though three firms presented their proposals to the council in a special town council meeting on Nov. 1. Brady, who serves on a technical committee for the Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce’s attainable housing coalition, said that attainable housing isn’t an issue exclusive to Mount Pleasant.

“Attainable housing is a question that is kind of swirling around the entire region,” Brady said. “Being able to support your workforce in that way is an important component of economic development and it will continue to be a very important part of economic development.”

A major part of Brady’s job will be attracting high-paying jobs to Mount Pleasant, as well as being a resource for already-established businesses in the town. The economic development strategy targets jobs in the informational technology (IT) and life sciences sector as desirable industries to bring to Mount Pleasant. Brady said he also wants to focus on entrepreneurship and innovation.

“I think it’s important to recognize that we have a lot of great businesses that are in town already. We truly appreciate them, and the Town is here as a resource for them as well. That goes for small businesses up to large firms that have hundreds of employees. We want to do everything we can to help them grow and expand their presence in Mount Pleasant,” Brady said.

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Friday headlines: S.C. Supreme Court overturns state’s 6-week abortion ban

The South Carolina Supreme Court permanently blocked the state’s six-week abortion ban Thursday in a 3-2 ruling. The high court ruled the ban violated the state constitution’s right to privacy.The ruling made national news, with ...

The South Carolina Supreme Court permanently blocked the state’s six-week abortion ban Thursday in a 3-2 ruling. The high court ruled the ban violated the state constitution’s right to privacy.

The ruling made national news, with The New York Times writing, it was “a major victory for abortion rights in the South, where the procedure is strictly limited.”

The justices based the majority decision on an explicit provision of the South Carolina constitution — something that the U.S. Constitution doesn’t have — that guarantees a personal right to privacy.

The Times added, “It is the first final ruling by a state Supreme Court on the state constitutionality of abortion since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June, which ended the right to abortion under the federal constitution that had been in force for half a century, and left the matter to the states.”

In other headlines:

Charleston airport looks to add new parking lot, expand terminal. Charleston International Airport may see some changes in the near future. Airport officials proposed a new overnight parking lot for passenger planes to make room for the coming terminal expansion.

Mount Pleasant to form new green commission. Mount Pleasant Mayor Will Haynie announced a citizen-lead green commission to keep the town beautiful and green. The commission will help conserve the greenspace in Mount Pleasant.

Shem Creek boat landing closing for renovations. The boat landing is scheduled to close Monday for renovations including repaving the boat landing parking lot, installing new stormwater structures and storm drain lines along with dredging under the floating dock.

New library at juvenile detention center holding book drive. Librarians at the new library in the Charleston County Juvenile Detention Center are looking to expand its collection with a book drive. Many of the books requested for the drive were requested by the teens.

S.C. Supreme Court hear electrocution, firing squad case. South Carolina Supreme Court justices grilled attorneys for four death row inmates over whether the newly established firing squad or electric chair violates the state constitution. The Supreme Court also questioned attorneys for the state prison agency over why it’s been unable to obtain drugs for lethal injection, a universally preferred method of execution.

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Kinzie Capital Partners Acquires One-Stop Supplier GT Golf Holdings, Inc.

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kinzie Capital Partners LP (“Kinzie”), a Chicago-based private equity firm, announced that through an affiliated entity it has acquired GT Golf Holdings, Inc. (“GT Golf” or the “Company”), headquartered in Vista, CA with additional locations in Fort Worth, TX and Mount Pleasant, SC. The transaction was completed in partnership with the Company’s management, including President Brian Van De Veere, Chi...

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kinzie Capital Partners LP (“Kinzie”), a Chicago-based private equity firm, announced that through an affiliated entity it has acquired GT Golf Holdings, Inc. (“GT Golf” or the “Company”), headquartered in Vista, CA with additional locations in Fort Worth, TX and Mount Pleasant, SC. The transaction was completed in partnership with the Company’s management, including President Brian Van De Veere, Chief Operating Officer Gary Anderson and Vice President of Sales and Marketing Patrick Coughlin, who will continue to hold key management roles at the Company.

“Brian, Gary and Patrick’s commitment to expanding the business, coupled with the rapid growth of the fragmented golf supply market, provides a strong opportunity for Kinzie to enter this attractive market”

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GT Golf was founded in 1995 and offers a wide breadth of consumable products, including golf grips, accessories and tees, sourcing more than 3,000 SKUs from over 150 vendors in addition to 300 Company-owned proprietary products.

“We are thrilled to partner with Kinzie as we move into our next phase of growth and innovation,” said Brian Van De Veere, President of GT Golf. “Kinzie’s collaborative relationship with technology specialists along with their operational expertise presents us with an opportunity to expand our reach into new markets and demographics.”

With the acquisition by Kinzie, GT Golf will be able to leverage Kinzie’s strategic partnership with management and technology consulting firm Clarity Partners to utilize transformative technology and extend its national presence.

“Brian, Gary and Patrick’s commitment to expanding the business, coupled with the rapid growth of the fragmented golf supply market, provides a strong opportunity for Kinzie to enter this attractive market,” said Suzanne Yoon, Founder and Managing Partner of Kinzie Capital Partners. “We are proud to work with GT Golf’s management team as they expand the business nationally and increase its position as a leading wholesale supplier in this space.”

CIBC Cleary Gull served as the exclusive financial advisor to GT Golf on this transaction.

About GT Golf Holdings, Inc.

Since 1995, GT Golf Holdings, Inc. has had a mission to deliver great value to its partners by providing exceptional service and availability as a one-stop resource for pro shop supplies, wholesale golf grips and club assembly items, golf accessories and custom tournament items. GT Golf delivers on its mission by providing personal assistance, delivering orders by the swiftest means possible and leveraging innovative techniques to bring distinctive merchandise, efficient ordering processes and reduction of overall costs to clients. Learn more at www.ggolf.com.

Kinzie invests in lower middle-market companies in the manufactured products, business services and consumer industries. In alliance with Clarity Partners, LLC, specialists in management and technology consulting, Kinzie has assembled a team of technology, operations and industry experts that work closely with its portfolio companies to execute strategic vision. Whether companies are navigating a generational shift, experiencing a period of high growth or managing a complex business cycle, Kinzie seeks to create sustainable outcomes by leveraging technology and strong operational focus. For more information visit www.kinziecp.com.

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