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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Johns Island, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Kiawah Island real estate investment firm to build golf course on 885-acre Johns Is. tract

A real estate investment firm that owns the developer of Kiawah Island plans to build a private golf course on Johns Island and invest in new and existing resort and residential project locally and across the Southeast after raising $225 million in a new fund.South Street Partners plans to turn the nearly 900-acre Orange Hill tract into an 18-hole golf course community with homes. It will include a short course and a practice facility for members of Kiawah Island Club. The property between Bohicket and River roads is now used as an ou...

A real estate investment firm that owns the developer of Kiawah Island plans to build a private golf course on Johns Island and invest in new and existing resort and residential project locally and across the Southeast after raising $225 million in a new fund.

South Street Partners plans to turn the nearly 900-acre Orange Hill tract into an 18-hole golf course community with homes. It will include a short course and a practice facility for members of Kiawah Island Club. The property between Bohicket and River roads is now used as an outdoor sporting site by the private club.

The land use allows for a golf course and associated amenities as well as residential development, said Chris Randolph, a South Street partner. He said plans are still evolving for the site, and it hasn’t been determined how many homes will be part of the Orange Hill development.

The golf course will take up about 300 acres.

Part of the property is in a planned unit development through Charleston County that allows 181 home sites, a golf course, clubhouse, pro shop, amenity center and about 212 acres of preserved land.

“We are working with the county and other constituents on Johns Island for a plan that everyone is happy with,” said Randolph, whose firm is headquartered in Charleston and Charlotte.

A representative of the Johns Island Community Association did not immediately respond for comment on the proposed development.

He hopes to start development of the as-yet unnamed layout next year, followed by 12 to 18 months of construction. He also said it was too early to provide a cost estimate for the course, which will be one of the few to be built in South Carolina in recent years.

Randolph said the course would provide members with an additional golfing option and take some of the playing pressure off of the club’s two existing layouts, Cassique and the River Course, where usage has increased sharply during the pandemic. The average member played 40 more rounds in 2021 than in 2019, according to South Street.

“We think there is a new market of people who have recently moved to Charleston who would have an interest in joining a golf club like this given its proximity to the city and especially since it offers members access to the rest of the Kiawah Island Club amenities,” Randolph said.

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The course will be designed by Beau Welling of Greenville, who previously worked with River Course designer Tom Fazio. Welling also is partners with Tiger Woods in the golfing great’s golf course design business.

The vision for the new course is to create a playing experience that looks like it could have been crafted more than 100 years ago, according to South Street. It will be built around grand live oaks and feature “undulating fairways ... and Old World slopes and contours.”

The company’s future plans for Kiawah include additional residential development as well as the opening of the oceanfront Cape Club adjacent to The Cape on Kiawah, a condominium development on the sea island’s western end. The Cape Club is expected to break ground in August.

South Street also recently acquired the 131-year-old Two Meeting Street Inn on the Charleston peninsula for nearly $7.7 million. It will be refurbished and become an overnight accommodation for Kiawah Island Club members when it reopens in 2023.

Randolph said raising the money for the golf course and other developments was challenging during the pandemic but the effort attracted “outsized investor demand” because of “compelling opportunities.”

South Street Partners’ other investments from the fund include the acquisition and development of the 20,000-acre Palmetto Bluff community in Bluffton near Hilton Head Island.

The company also has its sights set on other resort properties across the Southeast from south of Washington, D.C., to Florida and west to Texas.

“We are continuing to look for opportunities,” Randolph said.

Those could include existing properties or new developments.

South Street also owns The Cliffs communities across the mountains of South Carolina and North Carolina as well as The Residences at Salamander in Virginia.

Upcoming Johns Island restaurant will serve ‘traditional meets modern’ Mexican fare

Chef Alex Yellan is nearing the opening of what he hopes will be his dream Mexican restaurant.Named Colectivo, the destination at 2901 Maybank Highway will cater to a local Johns Island crowd, serving Mexican food that Yellan himself craves — dishes you might actually find in Mexico, perhaps with a cheffy twist.“I think for me that’s one of the things that’s most exciting, is having the chance to cook for a larger portion of locals,” Yellan said. “It’ll be cool to be a part of that grow...

Chef Alex Yellan is nearing the opening of what he hopes will be his dream Mexican restaurant.

Named Colectivo, the destination at 2901 Maybank Highway will cater to a local Johns Island crowd, serving Mexican food that Yellan himself craves — dishes you might actually find in Mexico, perhaps with a cheffy twist.

“I think for me that’s one of the things that’s most exciting, is having the chance to cook for a larger portion of locals,” Yellan said. “It’ll be cool to be a part of that growing Johns Island crowd out there.”

Born in Arizona, Yellan spent a summer living with a family in Mexico during college, taking residence there again in his 20s with a former co-worker. Colectivo’s menu will be influenced by this experience and techniques he learned throughout his career in professional kitchens.

“We’re trying to find that line between traditional and modern,” Yellan said. “Mexican food is living and breathing just like any other cuisine.”

After leaving his post as executive chef at downtown Charleston wine bar The Tippling House, Yellan started testing out Colectivo dishes at a friend’s house. Carnitas ribs, shrimp cócteles, bone marrow birria sopes, cochinita pibil and potatoes with Edam cheese are a handful of dishes that could land on the forthcoming restaurant’s menu, which will feature a mix of small plates and larger mains.

Colectivo’s tacos and burritos won’t arrive as they do in other Charleston restaurants. Similar to a barbecue restaurant, meats will be served by the pound along with sides and stacks of house-made tortillas.

The idea is to share among the table.

“You’re going to see the chef on some plates, but when it comes to the meats, I’m kind of over the idea of doing the chef-curated taco,” Yellan said. “What we just want to have is really nicely cooked meats with their garnish and their salsa and everyone’s grabbing at it and enjoying that family-style.”

Mexican meats and sides aren’t the only thing that will be shared at Colectivo, which will open for dinner Wednesdays through Saturdays. On Mondays and Tuesdays, Yellan will lend the 75-seat venue to former Xiao Bao Biscuit colleague Jamey Fairchild, who will serve food from his Gingerbug pop-up. Guests who visit on those nights can expect Thai curries and charcoal-grilled snacks.

Colectivo is targeting a fall opening. Before the restaurant debuts, Yellan plans to host a series of pop-ups starting in August.

James Island couple claims they’re out thousands after contractor never did work

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A couple on James Island thought they were well on their way to renovating their back deck after hiring a Lowcountry contractor. But after the contractor took their money, they say the work never got done.Don Geddes and his wife have lived on James Island for more than two decades. They recently revamped their front steps and in September of last year decided they wanted to pull the trigger on renovating their back deck as well. They wanted a certain material and Geddes says Travis Tardiff of Tardiff Builde...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A couple on James Island thought they were well on their way to renovating their back deck after hiring a Lowcountry contractor. But after the contractor took their money, they say the work never got done.

Don Geddes and his wife have lived on James Island for more than two decades. They recently revamped their front steps and in September of last year decided they wanted to pull the trigger on renovating their back deck as well. They wanted a certain material and Geddes says Travis Tardiff of Tardiff Builders initially came recommended by the company that makes the material.

“The deposit was 50 percent of the job,” Geddes says. “The job was $15,000 and we wrote him a check for $7,500. And that’s the last time I saw him.”

Geddes says Tardiff started out by emailing them updates.

“I wrote him that check in September,” Geddes says. “We would get emails that told us where we were in the process. He said some of the material had come in, and then he said the material had come in but not the railing.”

The last email though came in March when Geddes says Tardiff dissolved the contract.

“He said the money orders are in the mail – but we never got that,” Geddes says.

Geddes also found, out after the fact, that Tardiff’s contracting license with the state expired months before even taking on the job.

Attempts to reach Tardiff through multiple forms failed. The email account listed was not accurate and bounced back. Some of the phone numbers listed were out of service. One phone number made it to voicemail, but it was full. The address for the business listed is now occupied by another company.

At this point, Geddes has filed a complaint with the Better Business Bureau and says his next step is to take the matter to small claims court.

“We also need some kind of emotional closure to this – because it was a violation in a way for us,” Geddes says. “But doing the interviews with the new people are more exciting because I’m going to be counting on these people to do the work they promised to do.”

If you are in a similar situation, you should contact the S.C. Department of Consumer Affairs and the Better Business Bureau.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Clemson experts predict watermelon production about to get more expensive

BLACKVILLE, S.C. -- During the 2022 Clemson University Watermelon Field Day, growers learned overuse of tebuconazole has resulted in resistance in watermelons and other cucurbits leaving growers to rely on more expensive alternatives to treat their crops.Tebuconazole is an ingredient found in several fungicide products and is used to treat fungal and disease problems such as gummy stem blight, leaf spots and anthracnose. It was first used in 2008 and has been applied frequently to watermelon and other cucurbit crops since that time. N...

BLACKVILLE, S.C. -- During the 2022 Clemson University Watermelon Field Day, growers learned overuse of tebuconazole has resulted in resistance in watermelons and other cucurbits leaving growers to rely on more expensive alternatives to treat their crops.

Tebuconazole is an ingredient found in several fungicide products and is used to treat fungal and disease problems such as gummy stem blight, leaf spots and anthracnose. It was first used in 2008 and has been applied frequently to watermelon and other cucurbit crops since that time. Now, gummy stem blight is beginning to show resistance to tebuconazole.

Clemson Research and Cooperative Extension Service vegetable pathologist Tony Keinath said he “…knew this day was coming,” adding watermelon production is about to get a little more expensive.

“One reason we’re where we are today is because tebuconazole is less costly to use and we’ve used it a lot on our watermelons,” said Keinath, who is located at Clemson’s Coastal Research and Education Center (REC). “Watermelon and other cucurbit growers should reduce the use of tebuconazole to manage gummy stem blight as the fungus has become moderately resistant to this very commonly used fungicide.”

Symptoms of gummy stem blight are large, round spots on the edges of leaves and dry cankers on main stems. Tebuconazole-resistance has been found in South Carolina and Georgia watermelon crops. Alternatives include applying mancozeb and chlorothalonil early in the season and Inspire Super and Miravis Prime later in the season. For more information, read the Clemson 2022 Watermelon Fungicide Guide. The field day was held at the Edisto REC in Blackville, South Carolina.

Matthew Cutulle, Clemson weed scientist located at the Coastal REC, addresses using anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) to manage soilborne diseases.Matthew Cutulle, Clemson weed scientist, addresses using ASD to manage soilborne diseases.

In addition to gummy stem blight, diseases and weeds also present problems for watermelon growers. Matthew Cutulle, Clemson weed scientist also located at the Coastal REC, addressed using anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) to manage soilborne diseases. This strategy was first developed in Japan in 2000 as an alternative management strategy to soil fumigation and involves applying organic matter (carbon source) to soil, followed by irrigation, to create an environment toxic to diseases, nematodes, weeds and insect pests.

Despite its positive effects on agriculture, ASD is not widely used, mainly because of high carbon-source costs. Cutulle is leading a study of researchers who plan to develop methods to identify agricultural carbon waste streams for promoting the use of ASD.

In addition to high carbon costs, using ASD in watermelon presents other challenges including maintaining proper soil health. Bhupinder Farmaha, Clemson Extension nutrient management specialist at the Edisto REC, is studying how carbon sources affect soil health to determine sustainable practices for using ASD in watermelon.

Angela Rainwater from Growers for Grace is working with the researchers to determine what carbon sources are best to use for anaerobic soil disinfestation. Chicken litter and molasses, and cotton seed meal are carbon sources used in the study. Finding new carbon sources could help growers adjust to supply chain issues and provide them with the carbon they need, she said.

“We’re trying to determine what makes a good carbon source,” Rainwater said. “To do this, we’re going back to the basics and finding what is one grower’s waste is another grower’s input.”

As for weeds, Cutulle said nutsedge is a “driver weed” in watermelon. Several control measures can be used for this weed including herbicides, stale seedbed technique, solarization, polyethylene mulch system and cover crops. To find out more about Cutulle’s research, visit the Clemson College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences webpage Weed ID and Biology.

Pollinator points

If using honey bees to pollinate watermelon plants, place hives in fields when plants are actively blooming.

Proper pollination is another important tool for successful watermelon production. Ben Powell, Clemson Extension Apiculture and Pollinator Program coordinator at the Pee Dee REC, said using suitable pollinators is important for cucurbits. Honey bees are not the best pollinators for watermelon.

“Honey bees are used to pollinate watermelons and other cucurbits, but they are not highly attracted to watermelon flowers,” Powell said. “To get honey bees to pollinate watermelons, growers need to control competing flowers in the field and wait to introduce the hives when the watermelon plants are actively blooming.”

Protecting pollinators is important and easy. Activities people can do to ensure pollinators are protected include planting native flowering plants to attract and benefit local pollinators, reducing mowing and allowing flowering groundcover to remain as forage for pollinators and limiting herbicide use.

For more information on pollinators and pollination contracts, growers can visit the South Carolina Beekeepers website: https://scstatebeekeepers.com/, or the United States Department of Agriculture’s website: https://www.usda.gov/pollinators.

Clemson Extension weather network

Weather knowledge is something else that can benefit growers and lack of weather data available to South Carolina growers led to the creation of a statewide weather monitoring network. Chris Thomas, Clemson Extension state weather station technician located at the Sandhill REC, talked about the weather system.

Chris Thomas, Clemson Extension weather station technician, talks about the statewide weather monitoring network.

“Clemson Extension agents and specialists realized the need for a weather monitoring network and a proposal was made to establish a statewide weather station infrastructure,” Thomas said. “The project’s goal was to establish a weather station in every county to help give real-time and historical weather data. A total of 50 stations have been installed with at least one in each of the state’s 46 counties.”

The project’s next step is to create a website to house the data. Once this website is built, calculators will be developed to help growers and agents make better recommendations based on actual weather data. These calculators will include weather data on rainfall, growing degrees and chill hours. Clemson University will work with strategic partners such as the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Climatology Office, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and the South Carolina Farm Bureau to collect and utilize statewide weather data to make better predictions and recommendations.

“This will help us forecast possible disease and/or pest outbreaks,” Thomas said. “South Carolina residents will benefit if we can predict these weather-related outbreaks.”

Gilbert Miller, Clemson Extension vegetable specialist and field day coordinator, said the ability to predict weather will be beneficial for South Carolina growers.

“The way I see this working for watermelon growers is that it will help show how many heat units have accumulated over a certain period,” Miller said. “This will help growers determine when their melons may be ripe so that they can plan for harvest, which will help the growers plan for labor, equipment and so on.”

Watermelon winner

In addition to educational information, field day events also included a contest for the biggest watermelon. Clemson alumnus Sidi Limehouse of Johns Island, South Carolina, garnered first place with a melon weighing 124 pounds. Limehouse credits his monster melons to the Sunn Hemp cover crop he grew on the same plot where he grew watermelons.

“I’ve been growing watermelons since I was a teenager,” said Limehouse who is now 83. “And I learn something new every year. I learned Sunn Hemp kills nematodes and provides a lot of biomass, so I thought I’d try it and it seems to have worked.”

Limehouse isn’t content winning with a 124-pound watermelon. Next year, he hopes to bring a 150-pound watermelon and then, a 200-pound watermelon the following year. In addition to growing a Sunn Hemp cover crop, Limehouse said he takes care of his melons.

“I test my soil to be sure it has the correct nutrients,” Limehouse said. “Then, if it needs fertilizer, I make sure I apply the correct amount. I also give my melons lots of water and make sure the soil has the correct amount of carbon.”

Limehouse graduated from Clemson with a degree in agricultural engineering. He started his career growing corn and soybeans on the family farm but eventually transitioned from row crops to truck farming. Today, he operates Rosebank Farms on Johns Island, South Carolina, where he produces fruits, vegetables, flowers and herbs.

James Island residents express concern over proposed development filling wetlands

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live on James Island are rallying together and encouraging an email campaign against a development off of Folly Road and Grimball Road Extension.The development would build 68 townhomes, 5 workforce units and commercial space. It would also allow for filling in 0.23 acres of freshwater non-tidal forested wetlands.Greg Payton lives on Donnie Road, right off of Grimball Extension. His family has lived in the home and community for more than 100 years. The proposed development would back up t...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - People who live on James Island are rallying together and encouraging an email campaign against a development off of Folly Road and Grimball Road Extension.

The development would build 68 townhomes, 5 workforce units and commercial space. It would also allow for filling in 0.23 acres of freshwater non-tidal forested wetlands.

Greg Payton lives on Donnie Road, right off of Grimball Extension. His family has lived in the home and community for more than 100 years. The proposed development would back up to his home. He says he is worried about a lot of things, including stormwater runoff and traffic.

“They want to fill in the wetlands, and they’re going to have to cut down some trees, so if it rains, where is the water going to go? It’s going to come on our families, it’s going to be in our backyards and we’re going to be flooded under,” Payton says.

He also has concerns about how the amount of people moving in would affect traffic and the livability of his neighborhood.

“I say each unit is two cars, that’s 140, where are they going?” Payton asks “People have to go to work in the morning, how long will it take for people to come down Grimball Road Extension?”

He says he wants to attend a public hearing about the plans.

“We want to make sure that if they are going to build something, that they do it correctly,” Payton says.

The applicant developers are requesting to fill a little less than a quarter of an acre of wetlands. That filling would not have “a substantial adverse impact,” according to an Army Corps of Engineers initial study. The study found the filling would have ‘no effect’ on any federally endangered or threatened species.

The applicant is asking to fill .2 acres to construct a commercial parking lot and the other .03 to install a stormwater drainage structure, according to a June 24th, 2022, Army Corps of Engineers’ notice.

The report says the applicant will preserve the remaining .75 acres of wetlands to compensate for any impacts.

The Army Corps of Engineers is taking comments on the project through Monday, July 11. Operators of the ‘Save James Island’ Facebook page are encouraging people who are opposed to sending an email reading in part:

“I oppose the filling of any wetlands (no matter how ‘small’)…this historic area is plagued by flooding and drainage issues, and the preservation of natural wetlands and trees are our best and least-costly defense. Pleas hold a public hearing so the Army Corps of Engineers has ALL of the information, including the voice of the people who live here.”

The applicant appeared before Charleston City Technical Review Committee in April and is working to resolve some of the comments before coming back with a revised plan for the development.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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