843-764-3333
7629 Sandlapper Parkway N. Charleston, SC 29420

kitchen countertopsIn James Island, SC

Let's Talk!

We offer a wide selection of stones and materials for your next kitchen renovation project:

Kitchen Countertops James Island, SC

Granite

Kitchen Countertops James Island, SC

Marble

Kitchen Countertops James Island, SC

Quartzite

Kitchen Countertops James Island, SC

Recycle Glass

Kitchen Countertops James Island, SC

Quartz

If you're in need of a professional, fast, reliable company for kitchen cabinets, countertops, and remodels, look no further than Stone City Kitchen & Bath.

Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

Heading Tag

When it comes to kitchen remodeling in James Island, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

Heading Tag

Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-764-3333

Free Consultation

Latest News in James Island, SC

New facilities focus on career readiness at James Island Charter High School

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - A shiny new basketball gym, an indoor-outdoor building construction classroom, a commercial kitchen and an entire wing reserved for health education are just some of the features of the two new buildings at James Island Charter High School. The $25 million development is the last major project in the Charleston County School District’s Phase Four Capital Programs plan approved and paid for by a referendum in 2016.The new buildings consist of a Career Technology Education center and a new competitive gym...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - A shiny new basketball gym, an indoor-outdoor building construction classroom, a commercial kitchen and an entire wing reserved for health education are just some of the features of the two new buildings at James Island Charter High School. The $25 million development is the last major project in the Charleston County School District’s Phase Four Capital Programs plan approved and paid for by a referendum in 2016.

The new buildings consist of a Career Technology Education center and a new competitive gym. Inside the CTE building, students will find classes aimed at allowing them to achieve a Completers Status by developing hands-on skills. The Completers Status opens the door for students to get a leg up in college or to simply enter the workforce straight out of high school. Principal Timothy Thorn says it’s all about giving students options and opportunities.

“The thing behind Career Technology Education is that you can get a completers status and go into the workforce and earn a living wage,” Thorn said. “You don’t need to go to college to make a lot of money or to do well early on. You can always increase your credentials over time as well. You can go into the workforce, begin to provide for yourself, have some success and then maybe find the path you want to go down. Either way, it provides a vehicle for kids to earn skills and credentials to help them be successful in life.”

Students can study culinary arts in a commercial kitchen or building construction in an indoor-outdoor facility filled with the same machines found on an actual worksite. Of course, there are state-of-the-art computer labs for classes aimed at teaching students coding, programming and engineering as well.

Perhaps most impressive are the rooms dedicated to health sciences. Before entering classrooms, students walk past a nurse station designed to simulate the triage area of a hospital. Across the hall, half a dozen medical beds line a wall in a room that mirrors what you’d expect to see at any medical school. It’s the same equipment used by medical students, down to the patient dummies. Here students learn the basics of care and medical administration.

“We’re ecstatic. The facilities are gorgeous and state of the art,” Thorn said. “It’s very exciting and I can’t wait to get the kids in there.”

Next door, the gym has more than enough capacity to hold the entire student body and has everything you’d expect to see in a high school gym. The gym is branded head to toe in school colors and even the new weight room houses dumbbells with the image of the school’s mascot – a trojan warrior – painted on the sides. While the building is designed for athletics, it also doubles as a classroom.

“Every space has its purpose and supports our academic mission and hopefully helps kids find their paths going forward,” Thorn said.

Students studying sports medicine, for example, have classrooms adjacent to the gym, while even the student store located next to the trophy case has an educational opportunity for business students.

“The school store for example. It’s about learning how to do inventory, run a store, the debits and the credits and taking care of the cashier and patrons and serving the public, so learning all those aspects of life skills and employment skills are critical,” Thorn said.

Students will be able to start using building buildings when they return to school in August.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

WWII pilots on a mission to bomb Japan practiced over Lake Murray. This is the story of Bomb Island

In the middle of Lake Murray sits a piece of land that holds a large history behind it.Doolittle Island, also commonly known as Bomb Island, was the location of bombing practices for American airmen during World War II.In early 1942, the United States planned a mission to boost the country’s morale just months after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and brought the U.S. into World War II. The U.S. planned to bomb Japan by launching B-25 bombers from an aircraft carrier.Pilots on the mission began practicing for it o...

In the middle of Lake Murray sits a piece of land that holds a large history behind it.

Doolittle Island, also commonly known as Bomb Island, was the location of bombing practices for American airmen during World War II.

In early 1942, the United States planned a mission to boost the country’s morale just months after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and brought the U.S. into World War II. The U.S. planned to bomb Japan by launching B-25 bombers from an aircraft carrier.

Pilots on the mission began practicing for it over Lake Murray, specifically today’s Doolittle Island, which is named for Lt. Col. James Doolittle, who led the mission. At the time, the pilots were stationed at Columbia Army Air Base, site of today’s Columbia Metropolitan Airport.

Although the men operated military planes and machinery, the living conditions at the base were lacking, historian JoAnn Zeise explained.

“The conditions weren’t good. Apparently, some of them were living in tents,” Zeise, curator of history at the South Carolina State Museum, said.

Soldiers on the mission were volunteers from the 17th Bombardier Group who joined the raid not knowing what they were signing up for. The airmen were only aware of what was to be done while they were en route for Japan, according to historical sites.

“These men and their personal stories of courage are so inspiring. it’s a great story to share about these people who volunteered to put their life on the line for their country,” Zeise said.

After a couple of weeks, Doolittle’s men transferred to Florida, according to multiple sites.

Even though they had a short stint in South Carolina, they still felt connected to the Midlands, according to Zeis. For years, the Doolittle Raiders held annual reunions, including several in Columbia.

“They were there to share many stories of their experiences and talk about what an honor it was to serve their country,” Zeis said.

Throughout the war, B-25s conducted practice runs over the island. during the course of the war.

Five of the planes ended up crashing into Lake Murray. Four were recovered.

One of the recovered B-25 bombers is on display at the South Carolina State Museum.

2 city-wide school supply drives accepting donations

The city of Charleston will be accepting school supply donations until Aug. 3. Local nonprofit I Serve with Joy will also be accepting school supply donations until Aug. 24. Both efforts offer designated drop-off points throughout the Charleston area.The city will give out the donations it receives during its annual Back to School First Day Festival at the Gaillard Center and the South Carolina Aquarium 1-4 p.m. on Aug. 7.“The festival is about community partnerships and is a way for the community to celebrate education a...

The city of Charleston will be accepting school supply donations until Aug. 3. Local nonprofit I Serve with Joy will also be accepting school supply donations until Aug. 24. Both efforts offer designated drop-off points throughout the Charleston area.

The city will give out the donations it receives during its annual Back to School First Day Festival at the Gaillard Center and the South Carolina Aquarium 1-4 p.m. on Aug. 7.

“The festival is about community partnerships and is a way for the community to celebrate education and show the students and families that we care about their education and want them to be successful,” said Mindy Sturm, director of the Mayor’s Office for Children, Youth & Families.

First Day Festival is a longstanding event the city started in 2003 to celebrate the new school year by providing families with supplies and information they need in preparation for the year. Attendees can enjoy food from the Lowcountry Food Bank and free admission to the aquarium.

“It’s a fun day where families can come together and receive free school supplies and take part in the free farmers market that the Lowcountry Food Bank provides,” Sturm said. “We will have about 75 community groups and organizations there with information to hand out about resources and services in the community.”

The community is invited to be part of the event by hosting a school supply drive or donating at the designated drop off points. For a full list of drop off locations visit bit.ly/CHSFirstDayFestival.

Local nonprofit I Serve With Joy is offering another opportunity to donate school supplies for the 2022-2023 school year with its first annual Back 2 School Drive held through Aug. 24.

I Serve with Joy connects local charities with businesses that are passionate about helping underprivileged students. The organization will accept backpacks and supplies at various drop off locations until Aug. 24 to fill over 250 backpacks with supplies that will then be donated to school giveaways across South Carolina.

I Serve With Joy has several drop-off locations in Hanahan, North Charleston, downtown Charleston and Summerville. Visit iservewithjoy.org for a full list of donation locations and more information

First Day Festival donation drop-off locations: Aug. 3 deadline

City of Charleston offices at 75 Calhoun St., Suite 3700. DowntownCity of Charleston offices at 823 Meeting St. DowntownDaniel Island Recreation Center at 160 Fairbanks Drive. Daniel IslandJames Island Recreation Center at 1088 Quail Drive. James IslandArthur Christopher Community Center at 265 Fishburne St. DowntownBees Landing Recreation Center at 1580 Ashley Gardens Blvd. West AshleyUnited Bank downtown location: 288 Meeting St.United Bank West Ashley location: 884 Orleans RoadUnited Bank James Island location: 430 Folly RoadUnited Bank Mount Pleasant location: 1492 Stuart Engels Blvd.United Bank Summerville location: 200 North Cedar St.

CCPRC seeks input on next decade of parks

Although no one truly knows what the future holds, Charleston County Parks is trying to answer that question as they begin the planning process for the next ten years in their Parks and Recreation for All plan (PARFA).CCPRC has held several public informational meetings and workshops to hear from Charleston County residents about what they would like to see from the agency in the next decade.“Our mission as an agency is to improve the quality of life in Charleston County. We do that by offering diverse parks and diverse p...

Although no one truly knows what the future holds, Charleston County Parks is trying to answer that question as they begin the planning process for the next ten years in their Parks and Recreation for All plan (PARFA).

CCPRC has held several public informational meetings and workshops to hear from Charleston County residents about what they would like to see from the agency in the next decade.

“Our mission as an agency is to improve the quality of life in Charleston County. We do that by offering diverse parks and diverse programs. And we really just want a thriving park system for everybody,” said CCPRC Senior Planner Matt Moldenhauer at a virtual public workshop on July 27.

Participants of the virtual public information session on July 27 said they’d like to see more campgrounds. There is currently one campground operated by Charleston County at James Island County Park. Participants also said they want improved connectivity between trails, better accessibility to parks for bikes and non-vehicles and more interpretive opportunities for historical and environmental education.

“All of us live in a place that probably used to resemble farmland or something else in a more natural state but people don’t necessarily understand the role that they play in that habitat,” Moldenhauer said.

CCPRC wants the community to identify opportunities for improvement in the park system and is asking that the community dreams big.

“This is our chance to really think big. There are no bad ideas. There are no visions that are too small or too big,” said Brie Hensold, a senior planner at Agency Landscape + Planning, the lead consultant for the PARFA project.

PARFA is CCPRC’s second 10-year comprehensive plan. The first plan, called Parks for Tomorrow, was completed in 2013. It laid the groundwork for enhancements at existing parks, the acquisition and development of new parkland, and the expansion of programs and services.

Projects mentioned in the 2013 Parks for Tomorrow 10-year plan included a county-wide greenway system, improved access to trails in urban areas, improving park facilities and the development of new parks in the county.

CCPRC owns over 11,000 acres of land in Charleston County and operates 18 parks, including beach parks and trails, and operates 19 boat landings. The agency also has five community recreation facilities and offers a wide variety of programs and events.

Currently, the third phase of PARFA, the “envisioning” phase that maps out the next ten years for CCPRC, is scheduled to be completed in 2023.

“It’s an exciting moment because we’re moving into envisioning the future. And that’s really why we’re having these community conversations because we want to do that hand in hand with all of you all the users and those who care and steward the system,” Hensold said.

If you’d like to have some say in what the next decade of Charleston County Parks looks like, complete the online survey at www.surveymonkey.com/r/CCCommunitySurvey. The public survey closes on Aug. 14.

Sign up for updates!

Receive Moultrie News promotions directly to your inbox!

By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: The Post and Courier, 148 Williman Street, Charleston, SC, 29403, US, https://www.postandcourier.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact.

Planet Fitness to open 7th Charleston site in former Bi-Lo; new eatery coming to Mt. Pleasant

A new fitness center soon will open in part of a former James Island grocery store, just a few doors down from a competing gym.Planet Fitness plans to add a seventh Lowcountry location in the former Bi-Lo supermarket space at 860 Folly Road. On the opposite end of the shopping center is O2 Fitness.Demolition of the former grocer’s interior is underway, and the gym plans to occupy 25,000 square feet of the 64,538-square-foot building on the east side, according to ...

A new fitness center soon will open in part of a former James Island grocery store, just a few doors down from a competing gym.

Planet Fitness plans to add a seventh Lowcountry location in the former Bi-Lo supermarket space at 860 Folly Road. On the opposite end of the shopping center is O2 Fitness.

Demolition of the former grocer’s interior is underway, and the gym plans to occupy 25,000 square feet of the 64,538-square-foot building on the east side, according to Mark Hoffman, director of development for New Jersey-based Garden Communities, which has owned the 4.5-acre retail center since 1994.

The new workout site is expected to open by October, Hoffman said. A lease has not been signed for the remainder of the building.

“I have two prospects that have expressed interest,” Hoffman said.

He declined to name them, but said both are retailers and the remaining 40,000 square feet will likely be occupied by one tenant to avoid any additional new wall separations.

“It will be a nice complement to what’s there now,” Hoffman said.

It’s unlikely to be another grocery store.

“I’m not talking to one now,” Hoffman said.

He believes a new tenant could sign a lease as early as the fall.

“Once one starts moving along, the others want to jump in,” Hoffman said.

The opposite end of the shopping center, where O2 Fitness and PetSmart operate, are owned separately by an affiliate of Gramling Brothers Real Estate & Development of Charleston.

Planet Fitness has other Charleston-area locations in Goose Creek, Mount Pleasant, North Charleston, Summerville and West Ashley.

The Bi-Lo store was one of the last two in the Charleston area to close in April 2021 after parent company Southeastern Grocers of Jacksonville decided to shelve the brand. The other store that closed on Sam Rittenberg Boulevard in West Ashley is now Palmetto State Armory.

What’s cooking?

A new business is headed to a former restaurant in East Cooper.

Lacey’s Take Away plans to open in part of the former Liberty Tap Room & Grill at 1028 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Lacey Lauterio and Mark MacGillivray will operate the healthy grab-and-go concept. Beer and wine also be available.

MacGillivray said the new venue could be operational in two or three months and will be open daily.

The former restaurant site sold in July 2021. Renovation work is now underway.

Mark Volkmann, CEO of MassageBook, a massage-industry version of the online restaurant-booking site OpenTable, bought the 10,051-square-foot building overlooking a small pond next to Chick-fil-A for $3.2 million.

At the time of the purchase, Volkmann said he planned to convert a portion of the former main dining space and bar near the water to office space and leave the kitchen and other restaurant space available for a culinary tenant.

The vacant restaurant is near Anna Knapp Boulevard and the Publix-anchored Queensborough Shopping Center. It’s has been mostly idle since the spring of 2019, after operating for 10 years as Liberty Tap Room. Previously, the building was home to TBonz Gill & Grill for 13 years.

On the way

A fast-growing pizza chain plans to add a 12th location in the Lowcountry by the fall.

Marco’s Pizza plans to open in November at 2826 U.S. Highway 52 in the developing Moncks Corner Marketplace near Cypress Gardens Road.

Franchise owner Roshan Ayub will operate the new pizza site. He owns seven locations in the Lowcountry, and franchisee Mark O’Driscoll owns four.

Marco’s plans to continue to expand in the Charleston market.

The shopping center, developed by Branch Properties of Atlanta, will be anchored by Publix supermarket, which has not announced an opening date.

Dog & Duck restaurant also recently leased 2,940 square feet in the new retail center. An October opening is planned.

Gassing up

A new convenience store and gas station is in the works for Mount Pleasant.

Tempe, Ariz.-based Circle K plans to build a new location on Long Point Road at Wando Park Boulevard.

The site originally was purchased in 2007 by The Pantry convenience store chain of Cary, N.C., for $2.1 million, but it never developed the property. In 2015, Quebec based Alimentation Couche-Tard, the parent company of Circle K, acquired The Pantry for $860 million and converted stores to the Circle K brand.

The corner wooded parcel has remained vacant for several years.

Framework

A Mount Pleasant custom framing and art store plans to open a second location on Johns Island.

A Simple Tree will launch a new 1,400-square-foot shop in the developing Hayes Park mixed-used complex under construction on Maybank Highway near Main Road.

Owners Carol Williams and Chris Williams will maintain the longtime East Cooper shop at 1304 Erckmann Drive that includes the sister business, Affordable Art of Charleston Art Gallery off Coleman Boulevard near Toast All Day restaurant.

The 16-acre Hayes Park, by New Leaf Builders, will be a mix of retail, office, restaurants and service-oriented businesses. It also will include a residential mix of 36 single-family attached dwellings and 19 duplexes and townhomes, according to its website.

Two new retailers are now open in Cedar Grove Shopping Center in North Charleston.

Discount store Five Below and cosmetics shop Ulta recently opened on opposite sides of Ross Dress For Less, which welcomed customers earlier in July in the center on Dorchester Road near Riverbluff Parkway.

Home Goods and PetSmart are on the way. Also, inside shelf work has started on the nearby Lidl discount grocery store after several months of inactivity. A spokeswoman recently said to check back in the fall for an opening date.

On the perimeter

A new fencing vendor is now open in the Lowcountry.

Superior Fence & Rail at 7710 Southrail Road in North Charleston is the third franchise location in South Carolina. It’s owned by Pat and Sue Monegan. He previously worked as a manufacturing executive, but he and his wife decided they wanted to try their hand running their own business.

Monegan said he studied several other options, but found an immediate connection with the fencing franchise.

“Once we started to meet and engage with the team at Superior Fence & Rail, it all clicked for us,” Monegan said.

The Jacksonville-based company’s leader believes the couple will find success in the growing Charleston market.

“They have a great business acumen and know how to build a strong team that can take their business to the next level,” said Zach Peyton, president.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.