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We offer a wide selection of stones and materials for your next kitchen renovation project:

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If you're in need of a professional, fast, reliable company for kitchen cabinets, countertops, and remodels, look no further than Stone City Kitchen & Bath.

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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Hanahan, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Hanahan, SC

17 acres of land in Hanahan by Tanner Hall causes dispute between neighbors and developer

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCIV) — Some Hanahan residents are unhappy about potential plans for a new apartment complex.The plot is 17 acres of land near Tanner Hall. Right...

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCIV) — Some Hanahan residents are unhappy about potential plans for a new apartment complex.

The plot is 17 acres of land near Tanner Hall. Right now the land is zoned for single-family use, but the developer wants to change it to multi-family use to build about 300 apartments.

"It's zoned single-family dwellings and it would hold about 70 additional homes. It's up for rezoning now," said Sean Kennedy, a Tanner Hall resident of 16 years. "I want to point out- this is for the second time in less than six months."

Kennedy says he wants the acres to be homes since that is what the land is zoned for. There are signs all throughout the neighborhood saying, "Say no to re-zoning."

"We have more apartments than what is needed," Kennedy said. "You can go half a mile, a 5-minute walk, and there are hundreds and hundreds of apartments."

"They are going to negatively affect my home, my community, my neighborhood, and my quality of life," said Brittany Wood, a Tanner Hall resident of two years.

The developer, Panther Resident Management, feels differently than the residents. They are requesting the City of Hanahan to re-zone the property.

"We think this project is a huge win-win for the City of Hanahan," said Eric Wardrop, principal at Panther Residential Management. "There are housing shortages all over Charleston. Hanahan is no different."

The planning commission meeting was supposed to happen Tuesday night but now is pushed to February. Wardrop said they have been meeting with city officials and residents to build the best plan for the community.

"[The current plans] included shifting buildings, enhancing landscaping buffers, enhancing security and procedures throughout the complex, fence around the gated community," said Wardrop. "A project like this is not detrimental to Hanahan where housing is expensive; not a lot of affordable options."

Still, Tanner Hall residents are concerned.

"No one wants to see Hanahan become a sea of apartment complexes like you can see in other parts of Charleston," said Wood.

The next planning commission meeting for the City of Hanahan is on February 2.

North Charleston’s switch hitting, always smiling, 77-year-old slugger

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCIV) — The only thing more silky smooth than Willie Brown’s swing is the smile he cracks while taking his cracks several times a week at the Hanahan Athletic Fields.“I can run the bases. I can throw. I can hit, both sides. I can hit both sides.” says the affable 77-year-old North Charleston resident.He’s a switch-hitting phenom. He still models his game after the greats of it.“As a boy coming up, my two favorite players were Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle. Both played CF...

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCIV) — The only thing more silky smooth than Willie Brown’s swing is the smile he cracks while taking his cracks several times a week at the Hanahan Athletic Fields.

“I can run the bases. I can throw. I can hit, both sides. I can hit both sides.” says the affable 77-year-old North Charleston resident.

He’s a switch-hitting phenom. He still models his game after the greats of it.

“As a boy coming up, my two favorite players were Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle. Both played CF and because of Mickey, I became a switch hitter. Those guys were my two idols coming up.”

Being out here, wonderful. His journey to get here after graduating from the old Bonds-Wilson HS, impactful.

“Hoped one day I’d have an opportunity to play, got out of the Army, Vietnam veteran, 64-67."

He found a tryout in Fernandina Beach, Florida, and what do you know? The unknown kid from South Carolina signed with the Montreal Expos.

“In 1969 and '70, I played with the West Palm Beach Expos Single A club. I was promoted to Quebec City, Expos AA. I led the league in hitting for half the season.”

Then, a crossroads. Playing seven days a week didn’t work for this 7th Day Adventist.

“I had to choose between God and baseball. Wanted to do this all my life, but the good lord brought me this far all my life- I’ll stick with God and beliefs. Nothing to do with ability. It hurt, but it was my choice.”

He chose a life of normalcy. He married and worked, he always loved baseball. Then, in 1995, at 50 years old, he found the Lowcountry Senior Softball Association.

He was just old enough to play.

“Treat me like I am one of their family members, joined in 1995 as the only African American on the team- treated me that time if I was a member and haven’t stopped yet. I enjoy the guys, comradery, friendship more than anything else. God first, my wife second, all these guys together in third place.”

He walked away from the game once. He doesn’t have to now.

“I’m going to die, maybe on the field, but I’ll be with these fellas as long as I can, as long as I live.”

For more information on the softball league, click here.

Air Force forward Parker Brown thriving after early setbacks at Academy

Parker Brown’s journey to becoming one of Air Force hockey’s most reliable players didn’t come without its roadblocks.A junior forward, Brown is tied for sixth on the team with nine points. He has scored four goals and logged five assists this year alone.Rewind a couple years, though, and Brown’s future at the Academy — and on the ice — was in jeopardy. Issues in the classroom and away from the ice nearly led to his expulsion from Air Force.Brown, however, wouldn’t trade those st...

Parker Brown’s journey to becoming one of Air Force hockey’s most reliable players didn’t come without its roadblocks.

A junior forward, Brown is tied for sixth on the team with nine points. He has scored four goals and logged five assists this year alone.

Rewind a couple years, though, and Brown’s future at the Academy — and on the ice — was in jeopardy. Issues in the classroom and away from the ice nearly led to his expulsion from Air Force.

Brown, however, wouldn’t trade those struggles for anything. They allowed him to mature as a student, an athlete and a leader.

“(I’ve grown) tremendously,” Brown said.

Brown admitted he didn’t have too many hardships growing up.

A native of Hanahan, South Carolina, Brown posted a 4.0 GPA throughout high school. And Brown’s youth and junior hockey career took him to Maine, Pennsylvania and Alaska, all places where he excelled.

Things became more difficult when he enrolled at Air Force.

Brown struggled mightily in his classes as a freshman, posting a 0.43 GPA and being placed on academic probation. He also got punished for an off-the-ice incident, putting him on disciplinary probation.

After no real struggles early in his life, Brown’s first few months in Colorado Springs were an eye-opener.

“I had to actually push myself to endure difficulty and new challenges,” Brown said. “Everything came easy growing up: School was easy, and I never worried about making any of my hockey teams.”

The mistakes created countless hurdles for Brown.

On the academic side, Brown had to stand before the Academic Review Committees (ARC) to plead why he shouldn’t be forced to disenroll. In addition to giving a speech before the ARC, Brown had to collect multiple letters of recommendation from professors and other leaders at the Academy.

Disciplinary wise, Brown couldn’t leave base for sixth months and was not allowed to wear civilian clothes in public.

And on the rink, Brown wasn’t allowed to play for his entire freshman year.

With so many roadblocks on the horizon, it would have been easy for Brown to give up. But those closest him convinced him to steer around them.

“I honestly think my parents played the biggest role in that,” Brown said. “They felt and I felt that I owed it to the Academy, the coaches and all the guys to give it a full year.

“After a year of being kind of miserable, I realized it was best for me.”

Becoming a leader

A few years later, it’s evident Brown made the right decision.

In his first year of college hockey — the 2021-22 season — Brown tied for sixth on the team with 19 points, helping Air Force win 11 of its final 16 games. This year, Brown has continued to produce at a similar pace, making his presence known on both sides of the ice.

“When you look at Parker’s game, not only is there no weakness, he is above the baseline in every area in regards to speed, skill, agility and courage,” Air Force coach Frank Serratore said. “He’s well above the baseline in everything.”

Another aspect about Brown’s game that stands out is how he plays bigger than his size. Despite his 5-foot-10, 158-pound frame — much smaller than the average hockey player — Brown led Air Force with 65 hits last season.

That mark was third overall in the Atlantic Hockey Association. Brown was the only player under 190 pounds in the top five.

In just a couple of years, learned lessons have allowed Brown to not only be an offensive, defensive and physical leader, but a vocal leader, too.

“The leadership that we have as coaches and holding each other accountable as players speaks volumes on how you grow as a person every day and the work ethic you have to put in,” Brown said.

Brown’s growth has also made a good impression on his coaches and teammates.

Serratore described him as one of the team’s “most complete players.” The coach also cited his maturity for not only sticking with the program, but excelling in it.

“It would have been easy to walk away,” Serratore said. “Took a lot of substance and maturity and growth to dig in. He’s a better man for persevering.”

Not only has Brown seen success on the ice, he’s fixed his grades.

Brown’s current GPA is 2.82 — almost 2.50 points higher than it was his freshman year. After nearly flunking out, Brown is an above-average student at a United States service academy.

“I grinded for that,” Brown said.

Finishing strong

Brown hasn't decided which role in the Air Force he wants to pursue.

He mentioned being a pilot or joining the United States Space Force as possibilities. And with his improved grades and discipline, Brown believes he is capable of fulfilling those aspirations.

But that’s in the long term.

Before that, Brown has goals for himself as a hockey player and for his team.

The Falcons are 6-12-2 overall and have lost seven games in a row. They wouldn’t be in the AHA Tournament if the season ended today.

Air Force is in a tough spot, but Brown’s used to clearing hurdles. The junior plans to use his personal growth to help the Falcons turn around their season.

“He was so low he had to look up to see the bottom,” Serratore said. “I couldn’t be more proud of that kid.”

Hanahan creates master plan, looks to revitalize town center with new businesses

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCIV) — Hanahan wants to expand.The city of Hanahan has developed a master plan to revitalize its town center and bring more businesses to the area.Kristen O'Neill is a part owner of Theory Collective in Hanahan. The hair salon opened about a year ago."Our team is growing...

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCIV) — Hanahan wants to expand.

The city of Hanahan has developed a master plan to revitalize its town center and bring more businesses to the area.

Kristen O'Neill is a part owner of Theory Collective in Hanahan. The hair salon opened about a year ago.

"Our team is growing. It's great. We offer more services and see more clients," said O'Neill.

O’Neill said she is happy the city is working to bring in more businesses. She thinks more storefronts could mean more traffic at the salon.

"I think it would be great, I mean, especially on Yeamans Hall Road, there is not a whole lot. There's gas stations. It would be great to get a bite to eat up the road," said O'Neill.

She thinks it would be great to work with new businesses.

"We love partnering with local businesses. We have done it in the past and we will do it in the future. However we can support local businesses, we will," said O'Neill.

Mayor Christie Rainwater says there are things that are missing from the city.

"The truth is, we are missing quality businesses, restaurants, boutiques. That’s something people want to see come in. They don’t want to have to go to North Charleston or a neighboring city to go to the doctor," said Mayor Rainwater.

She wants to know what residents see for the future of the town center.

The plan is something they can use to present to those who are interested in coming to the area.

"It really gives us resources that we need to present to people who would like to bring their development or business to Hanahan, and say this is where it may fit best," said the mayor.

The city wants to continue hearing from residents. They have a survey on their website at cityofhanahan.com.

"If you have a dream inside of you and you want to bring it to the downtown of Hanahan, we would love to work with you to do that," said Rainwater.

Dominion Energy set to cut state tree identified as hazardous

One Hanahan resident is doing all he can to save his Palmetto tree after receiving a notice from Dominion Energy that it’s been scheduled to be cut down.HANAHAN, S.C. (WCSC) - One Hanahan resident is doing all he can to save his Palmetto tree after receiving a notice from Dominion Energy that it’s been scheduled to be cut down.Jay Mullis says after returning home recently he found his tree marked with an “X” and a note in his driveway from Dominion stating the condition of his tree warrants action by the...

One Hanahan resident is doing all he can to save his Palmetto tree after receiving a notice from Dominion Energy that it’s been scheduled to be cut down.

HANAHAN, S.C. (WCSC) - One Hanahan resident is doing all he can to save his Palmetto tree after receiving a notice from Dominion Energy that it’s been scheduled to be cut down.

Jay Mullis says after returning home recently he found his tree marked with an “X” and a note in his driveway from Dominion stating the condition of his tree warrants action by the company.

The Mullis family has lived in this home since December of 2019, and they say the palmetto is the most important piece of their front lawn.

Mullis contacted a Dominion representative and shared his concern about the sudden notice that the tree was a threat and was looking to find a mutually beneficial compromise.

Dominion Energy said the tree has made contact with their energized distribution conductors and has been identified as hazardous.

After being told there wasn’t anything the company could do to save the tree, Mullis took it into his own hands. He has since trimmed it in hopes that it will no longer pose a threat momentarily and can give him time to move the tree on his own dime.

Dominion Energy spokesman Paul Fischer warned that customers should never hire a private contractor to work near power lines or attempt to do the work themselves.

“Untrained individuals should not attempt to trim trees near overhead lines for risk of serious or fatal injury,” he said. “Only qualified utility line clearance professionals or contractors who meet OSHA qualifications are legally permitted to work within 10 feet of power lines, or work on a tree that has branches within 10 feet of power lines.”

“I think it’s important that we start working together on these issues, it’s a piece of me that we cut and the tree I think will be fine and hope that they just let me move it back 10 feet,” Mullis says.

To purchase a new tree would cost thousands and Mullis says it would take years to grow to the size of his current one. He says all he’s looking for is a chance to work with Dominion to save his tree.

Dominion says customers with concerns regarding trees on or near their property should call (800) 251-7234.

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