843-764-3333
7629 Sandlapper Parkway N. Charleston, SC 29420

kitchen countertopsIn Goose Creek, SC

Let's Talk!

We offer a wide selection of stones and materials for your next kitchen renovation project:

Kitchen Countertops Goose Creek, SC

Granite

Kitchen Countertops Goose Creek, SC

Marble

Kitchen Countertops Goose Creek, SC

Quartzite

Kitchen Countertops Goose Creek, SC

Recycle Glass

Kitchen Countertops Goose Creek, SC

Quartz

If you're in need of a professional, fast, reliable company for kitchen cabinets, countertops, and remodels, look no further than Stone City Kitchen & Bath.

Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

Heading Tag

When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Goose Creek, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

Heading Tag

Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-764-3333

Free Consultation

Latest News in Goose Creek, SC

Goose Creek Fire Department ‘facing a staffing crisis’

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - There are about 48,000 people in Goose Creek according to the census estimate in February 2022. Right now, only 11 fire fighters are staffed to serve this many people from Goose Creek Fire Department.The Professional Fire Fighters Association of South Carolina held a press conference at Goose Creek City Hall about the staffing shortage.Roger Odachowski, the president of the Professional Fire Fighters Association of South Carolina, says Goose Creek Fire Department is facing a staffing crisis. As of Feb...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - There are about 48,000 people in Goose Creek according to the census estimate in February 2022. Right now, only 11 fire fighters are staffed to serve this many people from Goose Creek Fire Department.

The Professional Fire Fighters Association of South Carolina held a press conference at Goose Creek City Hall about the staffing shortage.

Roger Odachowski, the president of the Professional Fire Fighters Association of South Carolina, says Goose Creek Fire Department is facing a staffing crisis. As of February 17, 2022, the union says the station has about 8,200 calls per year. He says only 11 fire fighters can respond to this many calls from the Goose Creek Fire Department.

To put this in perspective, Odachowski says you need about 25-30 fire fighters to cover an average structure fire. He says last month, there was over 5,600 overtime hours logged from the current fire fighters working at Goose Creek. He says he’s never seen anything like this working on the front line or in his leadership with the association.

Odachowski says he’s been contacting the fire chiefs and Mayor Gregory Habib since February about this, but no one has responded and is willing to sit down and talk.

“The chief said it was due to COVID,” Odachowski said. “City officials said it’s because of this, it’s because of that, it’s because of this. We are here because the firefighters of Goose Creek are truly concerned about the safety of its citizens and it’s continuing to be ignored. We need bored to do something before it causes a fatality because that would be on them.”

Odachowski says over the last two years, Goose Creek Fire Department has lost 40 firefighters. This averages about $24,000-$26,000 for each fire fighter. In summary, he says that’s about one million tax dollars wasted.

“The citizens, 48,000 citizens sure, should be able to, with their tax dollars, be able to put out a fire in their own house without asking for neighboring departments,” Odachowski said.

The other men from the association that stood behind Odachowski at the press conference were affiliated with the neighboring departments. They say no one from Goose Creek Fire Department was present due to fear of retaliation.

Zack Jawish is affiliated with North Charleston Professional Fire Fighters Association, and he says having so few people working with no one able to stand by for backup makes for a huge safety issue.

“We stood outside for a press conference today and the heat was pretty draining,” Jawish said. “If you’re looking at putting these guys in their gear and running to a fire, you’re only having some days 11 personnel doing minimum staffing and that’s with the rescue browned out right now.”

Odachowski says he’s been contacting the fire chiefs and Mayor Gregory Habib since February about this, but no one has responded and is willing to sit down and talk.

“I think we’ve waited long enough,” Odachowski said. “Six months is a long time for this to continue to go on without any progress. You know, any testing, any whatever. So, so that’s why we’re here today. And, you know, we don’t want to come off as the aggressor, but with the terminations, the guys getting hurt, the next step is a fatality. So, we have to do something.”

Live 5 has reached out to the City of Goose Creek for a response and we are still waiting to hear back.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Minority leader positions at risk on the Berkeley Co. School Board

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The Berkeley County School Board could face difficulty with representation, re-election and diversity for this upcoming election season.That is according to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Goose Creek branch.A new law passed back in May called S910 will force two of the school board’s minority leaders to run against each other due to redistricting.School board members, educators, pastors and members of the Berkeley County community raise concerns at the Goos...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The Berkeley County School Board could face difficulty with representation, re-election and diversity for this upcoming election season.

That is according to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Goose Creek branch.

A new law passed back in May called S910 will force two of the school board’s minority leaders to run against each other due to redistricting.

School board members, educators, pastors and members of the Berkeley County community raise concerns at the Goose Creek NAACP emergency meeting about how this will affect Berkeley County School Board elections.

Reverend Nelson B. Rivers III, the pastor of Charity Missionary Baptist Church, says he wants to stay away from the political aspect and focus on doing what is right for the educators and students.

“We have to speak truth to power,” Rivers said. “Without worrying about whether it’s political. This is not politics. It has a political outcome, but this is not politics.”

David Barrow, the board chair for Berkeley County School District, says the board did not work closely with the lawmakers who passed this bill. He says the majority of the board does not support the changes.

“The current chair rejects this,” Barrow said. “Never have supported this because it’s wrong, and it’s not fair to the other members, and it’s against our policy.”

Barrow also says under the new law, leaders in odd-numbered districts elected in 2020 will have to run again this November and again in 2024. Those in even-numbered districts will keep their original four-year term without re-election.

Sharina Haynes, president of the NAACP Goose Creek branch, says they want the community to stay informed.

“I just want to encourage the community to know about the bills that are coming in through our Senate and House,” Haynes said. “Making sure that we have a voice and making sure that we are holding our elected officials accountable.”

She also wants people to realize how important this state law is when voting this year.

“You know, everyone focuses on the federal level, but state laws and state elections, those are the things that have so much impact on our communities, and it’s so important for us to keep engaged even in the midst of a pandemic,” Haynes said.

The Goose Creek NAACP branch says they fully support the BCSD school board’s stance on this issue. They also say they encourage everyone to attend the BCSD board meeting on July 26 to get involved and stay informed.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Lack of resources for children with autism causing parents stress

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Parents of children with disabilities say they are struggling to find adequate resources, such as daycare and therapy for their children across the state.Jamie Carter is a parent of a 5-year-old with borderline autism. She says her son has not had the therapy he has been prescribed since November due to a lack of available resources and short staffing of certified therapists. She says he switched therapists four times within six months because they will quit.She says she is had trouble finding ...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Parents of children with disabilities say they are struggling to find adequate resources, such as daycare and therapy for their children across the state.

Jamie Carter is a parent of a 5-year-old with borderline autism. She says her son has not had the therapy he has been prescribed since November due to a lack of available resources and short staffing of certified therapists. She says he switched therapists four times within six months because they will quit.

She says she is had trouble finding a daycare that will take her son because he is not potty-trained, regardless of his disability.

“It’s just been frustrating finding daycare, finding ABA therapy, because he’ll start with a therapist, they quit,” Carter said. “He went through four therapists in six months because they would turn over. So, the agencies aren’t able to keep people employed. You know, just consistency.”

Carter says the company she has been with consistently to support her son is discontinuing its services for autistic children next month. They had been providing help with learning and applied behavior analysis therapy. Now she says she does not know what to do.

“By the grace of God, I do set my own schedule,” Carter said. “So, I’m thinking about the poor mom who has to go work at a dentist’s office or wherever that doesn’t have that luxury. What is she doing with her kid? You know, because daycares aren’t going to take them.”

Able S.C. is a disability-run and led organization that helps foster inclusion in communities by providing adequate resources for people with disabilities across the state.

Mary Alex Kopp, director of public relations and special events for Able S.C., says this sort of issue comes from a lack of funding and not having enough people certified to work with these kids.

“Funding, funding, funding,” Kopp said. “Lack of adequate funding is the reason why things slow down, why they don’t move quickly. And when we have more adequate and appropriate funding, people have better access to two services, and that includes people with disabilities seeking those particular services.”

Kopp says a disability is not something to fix because there is nothing wrong with the person. She says parents just need to find their child the right place for guidance.

“Parents should feel that they have the right to seek the same resources as parents of children who do not have disabilities,” Kopp said. “And that’s kind of our main thing here at Able is while like certainly seeking very specified services that you need, that your child needs for their disability, it’s just as important to ensure that you were seeking services for your child to participate in that don’t necessarily, that aren’t necessarily disability exclusive.”

Able S.C. says Family Connection of South Carolina, South Carolina Partnerships for Inclusion, Federation of Families and the United Way 211 number are great resources for parents to contact if they need help for a child with disabilities. They can help with services from early intervention to parenting.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Proposed ordinance would allow Goose Creek residents to keep chickens

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Cayce Giddens has lived in Goose Creek for fifteen years. She said she and her family were getting stressed about the rising prices of groceries, inflation, and food shortage issues. So, they started talking about getting chickens to help ease that stress.“We talked about having chickens, and when we looked into what the city says about it, we found out they’re not allowed at all in Goose Creek, and that was shocking to find out,” Giddens said.Giddens started talking to some of her n...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - Cayce Giddens has lived in Goose Creek for fifteen years. She said she and her family were getting stressed about the rising prices of groceries, inflation, and food shortage issues. So, they started talking about getting chickens to help ease that stress.

“We talked about having chickens, and when we looked into what the city says about it, we found out they’re not allowed at all in Goose Creek, and that was shocking to find out,” Giddens said.

Giddens started talking to some of her neighbors and decided to start an online petition to try to get the City of Goose Creek to allow residents to have chickens. As of Monday morning, the petition had almost 300 signatures.

“We’re stressed out about food and providing for our families, and that chickens was an easy way to at least have those eggs in the background for their calorie content and their protein and just wanting to have that as an extra staple to supplement our groceries,” Giddens said.

She said the concerns she’s been hearing on the other side of the issue are about cleanliness.

“I think an ordinance is the best of both worlds,” Giddens said. “It gives people who want to own chickens that security of having that food, but it also gives people who don’t want to own chickens or worried about it a recourse to handle that if somebody’s not taking care of their property.”

According to the proposed ordinance, people cannot have hens without first obtaining an approved application and an annual compliance inspection and fee payment. Under the ordinance, roosters would not be allowed. One chicken per 2,500 square feet would be allowed, with a maximum of 4 chickens maximum regardless of lot size. Hens would not be allowed to be raised for commercial purposes.

The proposed ordinance says animal control or code enforcement officers may enter and inspect properties containing coops to investigate potential violations or compliance with the ordinance.

City of Goose Creek Public Information Officer Frank Johnson sent Live 5 News this statement regarding the proposed ordinance:

“At its June 14 meeting, Goose Creek City Council will consider an ordinance that would allow City residents who live in single-family homes to keep up to 4 chickens, depending on property size. The meeting will include discussion about the issue and a first reading vote. A City ordinance would not change or supersede existing HOA guidelines for residences governed by an HOA. Council members were approached by residents who are in favor of such an ordinance earlier this year.”

Council will discuss the proposed changes at Tuesday night’s council meeting at 6 p.m.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Goose Creek to break ground on new $9 million park

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek will be breaking ground on a new 13-acre park next month, and officials say it will have something for everyone.The new park is called Central Creek Park, and it will cost $9 million to build. The city will soon be breaking ground on a piece of land off Old Moncks Corner Road, near St. James Avenue, to build Central Creek Park.Recreation Director Crystal Reed said the park will cater to everyone.“The focus of this park is it’s going to be inclusive,” Re...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek will be breaking ground on a new 13-acre park next month, and officials say it will have something for everyone.

The new park is called Central Creek Park, and it will cost $9 million to build. The city will soon be breaking ground on a piece of land off Old Moncks Corner Road, near St. James Avenue, to build Central Creek Park.

Recreation Director Crystal Reed said the park will cater to everyone.

“The focus of this park is it’s going to be inclusive,” Reed said. “We’re on a wellness mission, and inclusivity is our top priority.”

The park will be funded by just over $4 million in coronavirus relief money, $1.5 million from the city’s general fund and just under $3.5 million from hospitality taxes.

Reed said with that money, the park will be loaded with features.

“We’ll have a sand volleyball court, basketball court,” she said. “It will have a greenspace with a stage with a food truck area, so that people can have social gatherings.”

Other features in the park include pickleball courts, a pavilion that will host events and an all-inclusive playground for kids of all ages and abilities.

Sean June lives in Goose Creek and came out to play basketball with his friends next to where Central Creek Park will be. He said he can’t wait for it to be built.

“I was actually kind of shocked because I was talking to my friends,” he said. “I thought they were going to put apartments over there, but it will be a nice addition to the community.”

June also said he plans on using the basketball courts and the food truck area once the park eventually opens.

“Every weekend, there’s always a bunch of people behind playing basketball,” he said. “I’m pretty sure it’s a big staple in our community to have parks.”

Reed said the city’s focus on building parks, such as the recently opened John McCants Veterans Park, is to make sure people can get together outdoors.

“It’s really just a focus on creating community,” Reed said. “That’s why we’re doing it. We want people to have activities and places to go in their city where they don’t have to leave the city limits of Goose Creek.”

Officials said the groundbreaking is scheduled for March 31. That’s when they will reveal how this park will take shape.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.