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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Goose Creek, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Goose Creek, SC

Former Goose Creek country club sold to homebuilder for $4M

GOOSE CREEK — A historic property in the Charleston suburbs soon could be transformed into a new housing development.Beazer Homes paid $4 million on Dec. 19 for the 37.5-acre parcel that once housed the Oaks Plantation Golf & Country Club off Red Bank Road. The previous owner was Mims Amusement Operating Co., which held the site for more than 50 years.The homebuilder’s spokeswoman did not have updated information to share on Dec. 20 on a construction time frame, but the Atlanta-based company plans to develop the...

GOOSE CREEK — A historic property in the Charleston suburbs soon could be transformed into a new housing development.

Beazer Homes paid $4 million on Dec. 19 for the 37.5-acre parcel that once housed the Oaks Plantation Golf & Country Club off Red Bank Road. The previous owner was Mims Amusement Operating Co., which held the site for more than 50 years.

The homebuilder’s spokeswoman did not have updated information to share on Dec. 20 on a construction time frame, but the Atlanta-based company plans to develop the site into 89 single-family housing lots, according to plans presented to Goose Creek officials. The city annexed the land in 2021.

The country club building, which suffered a devastating fire in 2008, was demolished in 2020, a year after the longtime private facility closed at the end of The Oaks Avenue.

The Oaks Plantation Golf & Country Club dates to the founding of the country. It was the site of Declaration of Independence signer Arthur Middleton’s 18th-century rice farm, which was established by a land grant in 1678.

The former yellow-colored Oaks Plantation house was built in 1892 for Maine businessman Edwin Parsons, whose family also once owned Woodlands Mansion in Summerville.

In 1956, the Oaks Co. Inc. paid $125,000 for the plantation house and the 140 acres of land surrounding the home.

It became the Oaks Plantation Golf & Country Club after Harold Mims, the owner of a now-defunct, coin-operated amusement business, bought the property in 1964. The main home was used for weddings and other events until the fire heavily damaged the site 14 years ago.

The plantation home, grounds and golf course shut their doors to the public in March 2019. The property’s land use allows single-family homes.

A Beazer Homes representative previously said the company was drawn to the property because of its close proximity to “commuting corridors” and the mature trees and ponds that make up the former club.

Home sales across every housing market in South Carolina plummeted by double digits in November as higher mortgage interest rates and escalating prices pushed would-be buyers out of the market.

The decline marks the 12th consecutive month for lower housing transactions across the Palmetto State.

Residential sales plunged more than 28 percent last month compared to November 2021, according to data from the S.C. Realtors Association.

In November, 7,029 homes changed hands at a median price of $320,000, up nearly $35,000, or 12.1 percent, from a year earlier. The median price is also down $9,000 from the record set across the state in June of $329,000.

So far this year through November, 99,679 residences have sold across the state at a median price of $315,000. Volume is down 10.9 percent while the price is up 16.7 percent compared to the first 11 months of last year.

For comparison, from January through October 2019, 91,309 homes sold at a median price of $218,000.

The outgoing president of the state Realtors group said the pace of sales is stabilizing to pre-pandemic conditions, but prices remain elevated because of low inventory, higher borrowing costs and overall inflation.

Looking ahead, Cindy Creamer, an agent with Dunes Real Estate on Hilton Head Island, said, “Higher interest rates will have more of an impact now” and “it’s going to be tough” for first-time homebuyers.

On a bright note, she cited a report from the National Association of Realtors that said Charleston and the Greenville/Spartanburg area are among the top places in the U.S. that are poised for continued housing growth in 2023.

“I think we will be holding our own in South Carolina next year,” she said.

From the coast to the mountains, home sales were off 18.5 percent to more than 46 percent as no market was immune to the decline in transactions.

Charleston, the state’s largest market by volume, posted a 33 percent drop in closings. Myrtle Beach, the second-largest market in terms of sales, slipped nearly 37 percent. Columbia saw a decline of almost 27 percent while Greenville was down 18.5 percent.

Hilton Head slid 35 percent while Rock Hill dipped 21 percent.

Pricewise, every metropolitan area in South Carolina posted increases from nearly 6.5 percent to almost 12 percent. Myrtle Beach saw a 19 percent spike over the same month a year ago. While sales were down in October, the median price came in higher at all major markets in the state.

As for rising prices, which continue to put homes out of reach for many would-be buyers, Creamer said sellers “need to get a little more realistic” with the market.

“Overall, prices may readjust another 10 percent, but I don’t think they will be drastically cut,” Creamer said.

Hilton Head Island continued to lead the state with the highest median price of $499,480. Rock Hill, in the growing suburbs of Charlotte, ranked second at $400,000 and surpassed Charleston, which dropped to third highest at $394,900.

Beaufort came in at $370,000, Myrtle Beach at $318,930 and Greenville at $303,240.

Several areas reported median prices between $250,000 and $300,000, including Aiken, Anderson, Columbia, North Augusta and Spartanburg. Those below $250,000 were regional offices in Florence, Gaffney, Greenwood and Sumter.

Along with elevated home prices is the higher cost of borrowing, though mortgage interest rates have fallen in recent weeks.

Home loan financier Freddie Mac reported Dec. 22 the average rate on a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage edged down to 6.27 percent. The average rate on a 15-year note, popular for refinancing homes, rose slightly to 5.69 percent. Both rates were near or below 3.0 percent at this time last year.

“Rates have declined significantly over the past six weeks, which is helpful for potential homebuyers, but new data indicates homeowners are hesitant to list their homes,” said Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist.

“Many of those homeowners are carefully weighing their options as more than two-thirds of current homeowners have a fixed mortgage rate of below 4 percent,” he added.

Tentative date set for opening of Goose Creek park

Goose Creek’s new barrier-free Central Creek Park is tentatively scheduled for a Dec. 16 public opening, according to local public information officer Frank Johnson.The new $9 million park site will consist of a 13-acre, all-abilities outdoor recreation facility that is reportedly benefitting from the generosity of community-based donors.These monetary contributions, it was noted, will help pay for some of the innovative equipment and featured for the open space, located at 147 Old Moncks Corner Road.“We laun...

Goose Creek’s new barrier-free Central Creek Park is tentatively scheduled for a Dec. 16 public opening, according to local public information officer Frank Johnson.

The new $9 million park site will consist of a 13-acre, all-abilities outdoor recreation facility that is reportedly benefitting from the generosity of community-based donors.

These monetary contributions, it was noted, will help pay for some of the innovative equipment and featured for the open space, located at 147 Old Moncks Corner Road.

“We launched our We All Rise capital campaign late last year and have been pleasantly surprised and extremely grateful for the outpouring of financial support,” said Mayor Gregory Habib. “This giving level speaks volumes about our community’s commitment to ensuring inclusivity.”

The barrier-free components of Central Creek Park will serve visitors of all ages and abilities and they include: Debra’s Playground, Splash Creek, a field, stage area, a walking trail, the Eubanks Athletic Courts and the Casey Pavilion, sponsored by Roper St. Francis Healthcare.

“I hope the Roper St. Francis Casey Pavilion will be a place for residents of all ages to gather for health, wellness, fitness, and fellowship,” said Roper President & CEO Dr. Jeffrey DiLisi. “We are proud to be a part of this growing and vibrant community, both by supporting spaces, such as this, as well as providing exceptional care at sites across the county. We hope this special Pavilion serves the community for decades to come, and we look forward to continuing to partner with and care for Goose Creek.”

Jeff Lewis Architect, Trident Construction, The LandPlan Group South, Carolina Parks & Play, Landscape Structures and Rain Drop have all been commissioned by the City of Goose Creek to assure residents that the park will operate as a safe and friendly venue for all community members.

The aforementioned companies have produced and approved designs to facilitate wheelchair access across multiple areas of the park, along with swings, a zipline and several Splash Creek water-play features, such as: Mr. Claw Crab, the Pirate Cannon and the Big Kahuna Wave.

Park, play and exercise structures and/or amenities have been built to accommodate people of varying sizes, postures and mobility ranges in the interest of providing the highest of physical challenges while keeping hazards at a minimum.

It’s a sentiment that Goose Creek Recreation Director Crystal Reed wholeheartedly endorses.

“Central Creek Park is a testament to how important a universal-access culture is to the citizens of Goose Creek,” she said. “Our community stepped up in a big way to help create a world-class outdoor recreation space for everyone, regardless of age or ability.“

Project partner/supporter and CEO-President of Goose Creek Heating & Air Robbie Wright added: “We are honored and delighted to support such a game-changing community centerpiece as Central Creek Park. [It’s] a welcome addition to an already vibrant culture, the park will make fitness, play, awareness, and exposure to new opportunities accessible to all. Goose Creek Heating and Air is proud to play a small part in this extraordinary endeavor.”

The recreation destination’s footprint will be able to handle more than 600 individuals at a time and ensures that no one is excluded from the joys derived from outdoor play, promises Goose Creek Assistant Recreation Director Nicole Herrera Murray.

On that note, Murray believes that the new park will emerge as “the heartbeat of our community.”

Private donations made to the park were in excess of $1.3 million, which comprised leadership gifts, naming opportunities and a long list of Friends of the Park.

Notable gifts include:

• Casey Pavilion, Made Possible by Roper St. Francis Healthcare

• Early Childhood Playground, Made Possible by Berkeley County

• School-Age Playground, Made Possible by Boeing

• Splash Creek, Made Possible by Berkeley County

• Park Office, Made Possible by Goose Creek Heating & Air

• Field & Stage, Made Possible by Home Telecom

• Walking Trail, Made Possible by Berkeley Electric Cooperative & Trident Construction

• Community Trail, Made Possible by Mungo Homes

• Eubanks Athletic Courts, Made Possible by Goose Creek Recreation Commission

There is still time to support the park with a general donation or sponsor a Tribute Bench in honor or memory of someone special. A gift of $1,500 reserves the right to honor or memorialize an individual, group, or organization with an inscribed plaque that will be placed on a park bench. To learn more about dedicating a park bench or donating, visit https://www.cognitoforms.com/CityOfGooseCreek1/ParkDonations.

For information on Central Creek Park, visit www.cityofgoosecreek.com/centralcreekpark.

Goose Creek to name city’s new amphitheater after state lawmaker

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The city of Goose Creek unveiled an amphitheater in honor of S.C. Rep. Joe Daning in a surprise presentation Tuesday during his retirement celebration in Goose Creek.Joseph Daning is a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives, representing District 92. He also was a Goose Creek City Council member for over 20 years and previous Goose Creek Mayor Pro Tempore.Daning will retire from the S.C. House of Representatives in January 2023. Multiple former S.C. representatives, Mayor Gregory Habib,...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The city of Goose Creek unveiled an amphitheater in honor of S.C. Rep. Joe Daning in a surprise presentation Tuesday during his retirement celebration in Goose Creek.

Joseph Daning is a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives, representing District 92. He also was a Goose Creek City Council member for over 20 years and previous Goose Creek Mayor Pro Tempore.

Daning will retire from the S.C. House of Representatives in January 2023. Multiple former S.C. representatives, Mayor Gregory Habib, U.S. Rep. Nancy Mace and Daning’s family and friends attended the celebration.

All the speakers who gathered at the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church spoke about Daning’s long-lasting legacy in the city, Statehouse and House of Representatives.

“He was such a great friend and a mentor and very loyal to the Lowcountry,” Nancy Mace, U.S. House of Representative, said. “It was an honor to see that the Joseph Daning amphitheater was unveiled today in Goose Creek and that’s exciting for the residents of Goose Creek too and I want to thank Mayor Habib for that effort.”

The Joseph S. Daning Amphitheater will be located at the Municipal Center Campus near the Recreation Complex and the lake behind City Hall. It plans to include an outside basketball court, a food truck area, restrooms and additional parking.

Crystal Reed, the recreation director for the City of Goose Creek, says some examples of events that will be held at the amphitheater are slam poetry, improv, concerts and movie nights.

“I think the goal of the amphitheater and the projects that we’re doing in the city of Goose Creek is to bring entertainment into our city so that residents don’t have to travel and create more traffic,” Reed said. “They can get good dining options and good entertainment here in the city of Goose Creek.”

Reed says this project will break ground in April 2023 and it should take about 18 months to complete.

When Mayor Habib introduced the new amphitheater, Daning began to cry in shock.

“I didn’t expect any of this and then the new that,” Daning said, pointing to the picture of the proposed amphitheater. “You know, my father came from the Philippines. I am first generation. I mean this is just unbelievable. You know, I never expected any of this.”

The total cost of the amphitheater will be about $4 million. Daning secured $1.5 million in state funding and the remainder will be paid by ARPA funds.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Goose Creek providing extra funding to city staff and golf course renovations

More money for city employees and renovations to Crowfield Golf Club -- The City of Goose Creek unanimously approved these new ordinances to keep up with competGOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek unanimously approved new ordinances that will provide more money for city employees and renovations to Crowfield Golf Club in an effort to keep up with competition.People who play Crowfield Golf Club say these renovations will improve their overall experience at the course. As far as funding is concerned, the city says t...

More money for city employees and renovations to Crowfield Golf Club -- The City of Goose Creek unanimously approved these new ordinances to keep up with compet

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek unanimously approved new ordinances that will provide more money for city employees and renovations to Crowfield Golf Club in an effort to keep up with competition.

People who play Crowfield Golf Club say these renovations will improve their overall experience at the course. As far as funding is concerned, the city says they are using money they already have to pay for this, and they’ll still have some left over for employee bonuses.

The City of Goose Creek approves merit one-time bonuses for both full and part-time employees. City officials say the longer someone has been employed by the city in addition to their end of year evaluation, they can be eligible for up to $1,500 in bonus pay. This money is coming from savings in the city’s 2022 budget and will total at least $315,000.

Frank Johnson, spokesperson for City of Goose Creek, says employees will also be given a cost-of-living increase of 5% across the board.

“It’s just saying thank you to our city employees,” Johnson said. “It’s a way to stay competitive in a region where there are a lot of other municipalities out there. We are the best municipality. So, we want to make sure we are attracting the best talent. It’s about attracting and retaining talent for city employees.”

The City of Goose Creek will also expand the club house at Crowfield Golf Club with adding outside covered seating area for the bar and grille and extra space to host events.

Megan Leland, who plays at Crowfield Golf Club, says the club house needs to be improved.

“It’ll be able to fit more people because right now it’s very tiny,” Leland said. “And just a little bit of people is really echoey and loud.”

John Reilly, who started playing at Crowfield in July, says it will be more beneficial for everyone that comes here.

Mike Cool is also an avid player at the club.

“This is an asset for the city of Goose Creek and these improvements will do nothing but improve the asset the city owns,” Cool said.

The renovations will be paid for using the city’s hospitality tax under the 2022 budget, and what’s leftover will come from American Rescue Plan Act funding.

Andy Motroni, another golfer, says there’s a lot of ways to spend leftover money.

“Maybe not giving it out in the first place would’ve been a good idea, but nonetheless, now that it’s here and it needs to be spent, I think it is a good a way to spend it as any,” Motroni said.

These golfers, like Braylee Wright, say the renovations will bring interested players and hopefully more members to the club.

“We can have more people who don’t play golf come up here and realize how good of a sport it is and after you can chill out in the club house and hang out,” Wright said. “So, I think it’s good.”

The merit one-time bonuses for all eligible employees will be issued on Dec. 16. As far as the club house, there is no set timeline for construction, but city officials say the plans will be put out to bid in the next several months.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

How a new 300-unit apartment complex will shake up the Goose Creek area in the future

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCIV) — Tonight, the City of Goose Creek is expected finalize its plans for a new 300-unit apartment complex coming to Henry Brown Boulevard, as the city’s Board of Architectural Review will make its final recommendations to the developers for adjustments.The complex will take up 24 acres adjacent to Henry Brown Blvd. With 10 three-story buildings surrounding a central pond. The complex will include amenities such as a dog park, pedestrian walkway and a five-story garage.However, it has been a lon...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCIV) — Tonight, the City of Goose Creek is expected finalize its plans for a new 300-unit apartment complex coming to Henry Brown Boulevard, as the city’s Board of Architectural Review will make its final recommendations to the developers for adjustments.

The complex will take up 24 acres adjacent to Henry Brown Blvd. With 10 three-story buildings surrounding a central pond. The complex will include amenities such as a dog park, pedestrian walkway and a five-story garage.

However, it has been a long time coming to get to this point. The conceptual design was initially approved over a decade ago. The development is zoned under a “Pre-Existing Development” which outdates projects which were approved by the current city council and Goose Creek Mayor Greg Habib.

But with the population in goose creek growing by over 25 percent over the past decade, the main concern for residents is making sure the infrastructure is in place to fit the current state of the city.

“I feel that we're kind of at the mercy of the builder at this point, because they were approved so long ago, before the vision of what it should be for Goose Creek. So, anything that the [Board of Architectural Review] recommends or anything like that, it's kind of limited what they can do,” Goose Creek Resident Eric Bennett said.

“I really think that the city council, I think that the mayor is working with these builders and talking to them, and seeing how they can come to some middle ground and anytime that you're able to communicate, anytime that people are willing to meet in the middle, then everybody wins," Bennett continued.

Since the project was approved already the BAR can’t stop or reject the apartment complex from being built. The board of architectural review will make recommendations including lighting, signage and elevation at tonight’s meeting.

But the question for a lot of residents remains how those in charge will handle the project which was approved in a very different Goose Creek than we are seeing today.

There are already some changes in the works as the city has is nearly two years into their project to expand a portion of Henry Brown Blvd. from a two lane road to a four lane road.

The bigger concern for residents is the infrastructure around the building, with one of the key elements being storm water management. This has been a problem for the city and greater Berkeley County area for a while, especially after we saw flooding impacts from Hurricane Ian and Tropical storm Nicole hit those areas.

While some say the complex isn’t a negative for the city, residents do say they want to see the right steps made in the implementation of this new building to fit into the city’s current structure.

“The challenge that you have, though is where does the money come to get that infrastructure put in place? And the answer to that is to the growth, right? Putting these projects and the impact fees that come from these projects towards that infrastructure, the tax revenue, and everything else from the property taxes and stuff is what's going to drive the ability to improve that infrastructure,” Bennett said.

In a statement provided to us from the City of goose creek officials says in part quote:

All stormwater requirements required by the county will be in place for these or any developments.

But there was no statement on whether the city or county as a whole would plan to change any of those with the new building in place. It is important to note most of the Stormwater Management or external infrastructure management comes from Berkley County and not the city of Goose Creek.

City officials also said developers now need to have any new apartment complex approved by the current mayor and council for full approval. Something which was not in place when this complex was approved.

The city's Board of Architectural Review meeting is scheduled for Monday at 6 p.m.

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