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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Daniel Island, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Daniel Island, SC

One80 Place to holds Turkey and a $20 drive-by fundraiser on November 22

Community Invited to help Homeless Neighbors during holidaysCommunity members looking to help out this holiday season are invited on Tuesday, November 22, 2022 to drive by One80 Place for its tenth annual Turkey and a $20 donation drive.One80 Place is once again setting the tone for the holiday season by providing community members with a festive experience and chance to give back to its neighbors who need our help. The organization is asking individuals, families, and co-workers to collect and drop off monetary gifts, proteins...

Community Invited to help Homeless Neighbors during holidays

Community members looking to help out this holiday season are invited on Tuesday, November 22, 2022 to drive by One80 Place for its tenth annual Turkey and a $20 donation drive.

One80 Place is once again setting the tone for the holiday season by providing community members with a festive experience and chance to give back to its neighbors who need our help. The organization is asking individuals, families, and co-workers to collect and drop off monetary gifts, proteins (ham and turkey), and grocery or household store gift cards to help in the mission to end homelessness for those struggling in our community.

Every dollar collected will go directly to support the community kitchen, providing 16,000 meals and rescuing approximately 32,000 pounds of food this holiday season, feeding hundreds of clients and fuel their clients’ housing plans.

In 2021, the effort raised $51,000, 275 turkeys, and 117 grocery gift cards. One80 Place was able to prepare over 12,000 meals with the donations. Organizers hope to collect $75,000, 180 $20 grocery or household gift cards, along with turkeys, hams, and non-perishables. As the holidays approach, the air is colder, its darker longer, and individuals and families experiencing homelessness are faced with a brutal challenge - winter. On any given night, roughly 350 people in our community don’t have a permanent place to call home. With so many clients struggling as the colder months approach, the organization is having to help a lot more people with groceries and household essentials. Gift card donations will aide in this process.

Donating is easy; just visit One80 Place at 35 Walnut Street on Tuesday, November 22 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., roll down your window and donate your monetary contribution, gift card and/or turkey. Contributors will also have the chance to snap car-side selfies with local personalities, newscasters and sport mascots. For those that cannot come by on November 22, community members can pledge their support by buying a virtual turkey online or creating your own peer-to-peer fundraiser at one80place.org/donateturkey.

About One-Eighty Place:

One80 Place’s mission is to end and prevent homelessness. The organization serves more than 1,600 individuals annually across 20 counties in the state of South Carolina. At One80 Place, everything they do is grounded in the belief that everyone deserves a home. The organization meets the immediate needs of those facing homelessness with the ultimate goal of permanent housing. Founded in 1984, One80 Place has grown to become one of the largest providers of services to homeless individuals and families in South Carolina. They provide community-based housing that is affordable, safe, and accessible. One80 Place has operated a shelter and community kitchen since 1984, and has expanded its services to more effectively end and prevent homelessness by offering legal services, on-site healthcare, and employment resources for individuals, families and Veterans. To learn more about One80 Place, visit www.one80place.org.

Ice skating rink coming to Credit One Stadium for the holidays

DANIEL ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Lace up your skates! Credit One Stadium is bringing an outdoor ice-skating rink to Daniel Island for the holiday season.“Skate the Stadium” will bring a new custom-built ice-skating rink to the entertainment venue featuring cozy fire pits, seasonal concessions, and special holiday events like holiday carolers, visits with Santa, and a Christmas tree lighting.“Our goal is to create thoughtful, unique experiences that bring joy to the communities we serve. By building an outdoo...

DANIEL ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Lace up your skates! Credit One Stadium is bringing an outdoor ice-skating rink to Daniel Island for the holiday season.

“Skate the Stadium” will bring a new custom-built ice-skating rink to the entertainment venue featuring cozy fire pits, seasonal concessions, and special holiday events like holiday carolers, visits with Santa, and a Christmas tree lighting.

“Our goal is to create thoughtful, unique experiences that bring joy to the communities we serve. By building an outdoor skating rink for the holidays we hope to create another way for people to engage in a new holiday tradition that encourages movement and social connection,” said Bob Moran, President of Charleston Tennis.

Tickets will cost $10 per person including the skate rental and a one-hour skating session. Organizers say non-skaters may enter for free. Special assistive devices will be available for those who need them.

Those tickets can be purchased at creditonestadium.com/skate-the-stadium

“Children 13 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Credit One Stadium is a drop-off site for the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation,” said organizers. “Bring a toy, get $2 off a skating session.”

Guests can enjoy cookie samplers, smores kits, cinnamon sugar pretzels and other classic concessions will be available for purchase. Hot chocolate, cider, and a full bar with seasonal beer and cocktails will also be on hand.

‘Skate the Stadium’ will open Friday, December 2nd. Dates to skate include:

Thursdays and Fridays from 5-10 p.m.

Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. & Sundays 12 – 5 p.m.

The rink will be closed on Friday, Dec. 30 and Christmas Day.

Daniel Island Tree Lighting Ceremony | Friday, December 2, Festivities begin at 5 p.m. with the tree lighting at 6 p.m.

Enjoy musical performances from Charleston Concert Band, carolers singing and activities for the children then watch the holiday magic of a 22-foot tree lighting.

Holiday Carolers Thursdays | December 8, 25 & 22, 5:30-6 p.m.

Catch the holiday spirit with vocal performances from local High School choral groups.

Ladies Night/Bubbles on Ice | Thursday, December 8, 7-10 p.m.

Nibble on hors d’oeuvres and sip on bubbles from Moet. Browse some curated holiday selection from local vendors. This is a ticketed event, $35 per person and includes food plus cash bar.

90’s Glow Night | Saturday, December 10, 7-10 p.m.

Skate to your favorite songs of the 90’s and sport your best glow gear.

Jazz Night & Bourbon Tasting | Thursday, December 15, 7-10 p.m.

Sample all-you-can-eat oysters on the half shell and a bourbon tasting with entertainment by Grammy Award winning Charlton Singleton & The Contemporary Flow Band.

Visit with Santa | Sunday, December 18, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Stop by for a visit with Santa the last weekend before Christmas.

DI gator euthanized, deemed aggressive and unintimidated

Some Smythe Park neighbors called him Big Al. The nearly 9-foot alligator was often spotted skimming the water or sunbathing on the shores of Smythe Lake. But he was harassed and fed by humans, prompting him to lose his fear of people and become a threat to public safety.On Oct. 26, Big Al was removed from the lake and euthanized.Rumors swarmed on social media. Residents asked why the gator had to be removed and why it wasn’t relocated to a less populated area. Some speculated the gator was put to rest prior to the popula...

Some Smythe Park neighbors called him Big Al. The nearly 9-foot alligator was often spotted skimming the water or sunbathing on the shores of Smythe Lake. But he was harassed and fed by humans, prompting him to lose his fear of people and become a threat to public safety.

On Oct. 26, Big Al was removed from the lake and euthanized.

Rumors swarmed on social media. Residents asked why the gator had to be removed and why it wasn’t relocated to a less populated area. Some speculated the gator was put to rest prior to the popular Pumpkin Walk that attracts hundreds of families to the park.

“There was a huge misunderstanding that day,” said Ron Russell with Gator Getter Consultants, who had to evaluate and remove the alligator. “Daniel Island throws many events at Smythe Lake and they call us in to do gator watch. The goal is not to remove every gator for an event; that’s not what they want to do. This was an isolated event with an alligator that needed to be addressed.”

According to Chris Hamil, field operations manager for the Daniel Island Property Owners’ Association, an alligator was reported exhibiting concerning behavior for several days. A resident called the City of Charleston about an alligator that had followed them home and was underneath their car. The responding animal control officers removed the alligator and returned it to Smythe Lake. Several days later, the alligator was seen repeatedly swimming alongside the water’s edge near pedestrians.

“Generally, when this behavior occurs, it is an indication that the alligator has been fed and will begin to identify people as food or food sources,” Hamil said in an email. “Upon observing this abnormal behavior, I notified our alligator specialist who arrived the next morning.

The alligator exhibited the same behavior towards the specialist.”

Russell performs a series of tests to determine if an alligator has lost its fear of people and has become aggressive. Indicators include: swimming towards people instead of going away and hiding, moving towards a splash in the water thinking someone is feeding it and hanging out in heavy traffic areas.

“He demonstrated multiple times he was not intimidated by the presence of humans and he hissed at me and Chris Hamil,” Russell said. “I’m a pretty big guy and when I can walk up to an alligator and it decides to hold its ground and hiss at me in the water, that’s not a good sign.”

Under South Carolina state law, it is illegal to relocate an alligator. “If Daniel Island deems it a nuisance or anybody else deems it a nuisance, it doesn’t give you the right to take that nuisance somewhere else,” said Russell, citing the inherent dangers of an alligator that associates humans with food.

It is also illegal to feed or harass an alligator, which includes throwing objects at or taunting the animal in any way. An offender can be fined up to $150 and imprisoned for up to 30 days. Russell said if residents see someone feeding or harassing a gator, they should contact local law enforcement.

“Hold the parents accountable for their kids and hold the adults accountable for their actions,” Russell said. “Daniel Island has done a good job of putting out those bright yellow (warning) signs, but you can go to any park and there are more signs than people want to take the time to read.”

Alligators are a natural part of the Lowcountry environment and important to the balance of the ecosystem. They keep wild animal populations in balance and their burrows create habitats for fish and other aquatic life. They are very adaptable creatures that have lived for millions of years and can coexist peacefully with humans. Russell said alligators inherently fear people and prefer to be left alone.

“The biggest rule when it comes to wildlife is to respect them from a distance,” Russell said.

“If you see an alligator, go to the other side, keep your pets close to you on a leash, and always be aware of your surroundings, whether it’s alligators or snakes; give them their space.”

Russell was raised with a reverence for alligators. His father, the late Ronald Russell, was an alligator patrol agent for the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources who started Gator Getter Consultants in 2012 to help manage gators that were losing habitat to increasing development and educate new residents about coexisting with the prehistoric reptiles.

“I never thought I’d grow up to love them, but they really are a fascinating and crucial animal to the ecosystem,” Russell said. “They’re extremely misunderstood.”

To report an alligator on private property, call DNR at 843-953-9856 or find a licensed wildlife control operator at dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/docs/nwco.pdf.

To report a nuisance alligator in Daniel Island common areas like parks, trails, and ponds, contact Hamil at 843-696-4676 or the DIPOA office at 843-971-9200.

Meeting Notes - November 10, 2022

This week there are a large number of multifamily and large residential developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as the application results for specific items to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.Nov. 10: A major subdivision for Cainhoy Del Webb Phase 1 at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road with a preliminary plat and road construction plans for a 164-unit, single-family residential...

This week there are a large number of multifamily and large residential developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as the application results for specific items to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.

Nov. 10: A major subdivision for Cainhoy Del Webb Phase 1 at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Road with a preliminary plat and road construction plans for a 164-unit, single-family residential development.

Nov. 10: A site plan for Mikasa Apartments, a 336-unit multifamily residential building and parking lot complex, on Clements Ferry Road in Cainhoy.

Nov. 17: A preliminary subdivision plat and road construction plans for Parcel K Infrastructure, a major subdivision at 2000 Daniel Island Drive on 36.9 acres.

Nov. 17: A site plan for Woodfield Daniel Island 3, a 163-unit multifamily development on 6 acres at 2058 Benefitfocus Way.

Nov. 3: A linear construction for a bridge replacement over Beresford Creek at Daniel Island Drive. Results: Pending final documentation to Engineering and MS4. Once approved, submit plans to Engineering for stamping.

Nov. 3: A linear construction for the installation of a gas main and electrical conduit as a result of the Beresford Creek Bridge replacement project. Results: Pending final documentation to Engineering and MS4. Once approved, submit plans to Engineering for stamping.

Nov. 3: A site plan for a 110-slip marina and associated parking at Thomas Island Marina on Clements Ferry Road. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

Nov. 3: A site plan for tree and vegetation removal, rough grading and surcharge at Woodfield Point Hope 3, a 312-unit multifamily apartment complex on 44.6 acres, at Clements Ferry Road and Cainhoy Village Road. Results: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

Nov. 3: A site plan for Travis Lane Townhomes, 52 units on 11.44 acres, on Travis Lane in Cainhoy. Results: Submit to TRC for 1st review.

REGULARLY SCHEDULED CITY & COUNTY MEETINGS

Berkeley Co. Bd. of Education meets twice each month. Executive Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.; meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

Berkeley Co. Council meets fourth Mon. of each month, 6 p.m., Berkeley County Admin. Blg., 1003 Hwy 52, Moncks Corner.

City of Charleston Council typically meets the second and fourth Tues. of each month, 5 p.m., City Hall, 80 Broad Street, Charleston, SC and/or virtually via Conference Call #1-929-205-6099; Access Code: 912 096 416. Exceptions: Summer Schedule - 3rd Tues. of June, July, and August; December meetings on the 1st and 3rd Tues. Dates and locations subject to change.

City of Charleston Technical Review Committee meets every Thurs. at 9 a.m.via Zoom.

City of Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals – Site Design meets the 1st Wed. of each month at 5 p.m. via Zoom.

City of Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals – Zoning meets the 1st and 3rd Tues. of each month at 5:15 p.m., except for January and July when no meeting is held on the 1st Tues.

City of Charleston Design Review Board meets the 1st and 3rd Mon. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

City of Charleston Planning Commission meets the 3rd Wed. of every month at 5 p.m.

City of Charleston Board of Architectural Review – Large projects meets the 2nd and 4th Wed. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

City of Charleston Board of Architectural Review – Small projects meets the 2nd and 4th Thurs. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

All meetings are open for public comment except the City of Charleston Technical Review Committee meetings.

Meet the DI News’ newest Kids Say reporter – Elyse Gerding!

She’s a girl on a mission. And she couldn’t be more excited.Daniel Island resident Elyse Gerding, 12, is the newest reporter for the popular series “Kids Say,” published weekly in The Daniel Island News. The column was put on hiatus in March 2020 at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and returned with Gerding at the helm in August of this year.A student at Daniel Island School, Gerding is the second in her family to take on the role. Her older sister, Bryn, now 22, filled the post when she was in middle ...

She’s a girl on a mission. And she couldn’t be more excited.

Daniel Island resident Elyse Gerding, 12, is the newest reporter for the popular series “Kids Say,” published weekly in The Daniel Island News. The column was put on hiatus in March 2020 at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and returned with Gerding at the helm in August of this year.

A student at Daniel Island School, Gerding is the second in her family to take on the role. Her older sister, Bryn, now 22, filled the post when she was in middle school. Each week, Gerding gets a question from Daniel Island News Editor Zach Giroux, based on the theme of that week’s paper and poses it to six different kids.

“I just like Kids Say altogether because it gives kids a chance to be in the newspaper and for some of them, it’s so sweet,” Gerding said. “They get so excited! They’re like ‘I’m gonna be famous!’”

Gerding often visits kid-friendly places on the island, such as Pirate Park, The Waterfront, and Publix, to collect her quotes. Most of her interviewees are more than happy to participate when they see her coming, especially the parents.

“A lot of the moms are like ‘Oh my gosh! I love that section! My kids are gonna be so happy!’” said Gerding, who typically interviews kids between the ages of 5-11, with some as young as 2 and 3.

And if she ever encounters a shy little one, Gerding finds a way to make them feel at ease.

“Sometimes when they’re shy I just go ‘High Five!’” said Gerding, holding her hand in the air. “Because when they’re done, it’s so sweet.”

All in all, serving as the Kids Say reporter has given Gerding more confidence, she said, and the experience can also be beneficial for those she interviews.

“It gives them an option to be more interactive with people,” Gerding explained. “… And it makes them feel so proud. I definitely think it boosts their happiness and excitement.”

As for her favorite question so far? Gerding pointed to one she posed recently – What’s your favorite Thanksgiving meal?

“Chicken nuggets!” she exclaimed, recalling one child’s response. “That is the cutest answer ever!”

Even though Gerding has only had the job for a few months, her reporting skills are already earning rave reviews.

“Elyse does a wonderful job as our Kids Say correspondent,” said Sue Detar, publisher/managing editor of The Daniel Island News. “She’s a real professional – she always meets deadline and brings genuine enthusiasm to the job.”

Kids Say debuted in the very first edition of The Daniel Island News, published on Oct. 30, 2003. At the time, the paper ran the column without photos, as they were still developing film and had not yet started using a digital camera.

“The island was still small and the neighborhood kids would come to my house and write out their answers on my kitchen counter,” Detar recalled. “Our first question was: What do you like about living on Daniel Island?”

The first to take on the role was Julia Miano, a college intern from Winthrop. After that, Detar and her children, freelance writers and the paper’s graphic artist handled the duties – until the first official Kids Say reporter, Lainey Beckler, was hired in 2007.

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