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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Daniel Island, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Daniel Island, SC

Approval extended on DI tennis facility

This week there are a large number of multifamily and large residential developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as the application results for specific items to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.Dec. 22: No topics on the agenda for the Daniel Island or Cainhoy areas.RESULTS:Dec. 8: Daniel Island Club Court. First review of request to extend TRC approval of construction ...

This week there are a large number of multifamily and large residential developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as the application results for specific items to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.

Dec. 22: No topics on the agenda for the Daniel Island or Cainhoy areas.

RESULTS:

Dec. 8: Daniel Island Club Court. First review of request to extend TRC approval of construction of a new tennis court facility on Island Park Drive. RESULTS: TRC approval extended.

Dec. 8: Ship Builder Street, Daniel Island. Second review of a 31-lot single family residential development on 40 acres. RESULTS: Pending final documentation to MS4 and Planning. Once approved, submit to Planning for stamping.

Dec. 8: Foundation Place at Point Hope, Cainhoy. Fourth review of a commercial development including five buildings totaling 38,000 gross floor area at 826 Foundation Street. RESULTS: Pending final documentation to Zoning, T&T, MS4, and FMD. Once approved, submit to Zoning for stamping.

Dec. 8: Towne at Cooper River – Clements Ferry Medical. Pre-application of a proposed medical office building with parking at Enterprise Boulevard. RESULTS: Submit to TRC for 1st Review.

Dec. 15: Seven Farms Drive/Haswell Street, Daniel Island. First review of a preliminary plat for a 20-lot single family residential development. Road construction plans are under second review. RESULTS: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

Dec. 15: Marshes at Daniel Island. First review of a preliminary plat for a 26 single-family-lot subdivision at 144 Fairbanks Drive. Road construction plans are under first review. RESULTS: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

Dec. 15: Daniel Island Drive, Daniel Island. Second review of a private townhome development with 50 units, pond, private roads, open space and associated infrastructure. RESULTS: Revise and resubmit to TRC.

Dec. 15: Gildan. Pre-application of a site plan for an industrial building on 81 acres at 1980 Clements Ferry Road in Cainhoy. RESULTS: Submit to TRC for 1st review

REGULARLY SCHEDULED CITY & COUNTY MEETINGS

Berkeley Co. Bd. of Education meets twice each month. Executive Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.; meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

Berkeley Co. Council meets fourth Mon. of each month, 6 p.m., Berkeley County Admin. Blg., 1003 Hwy 52, Moncks Corner.

City of Charleston Council typically meets the second and fourth Tues. of each month, 5 p.m., City Hall, 80 Broad Street, Charleston, SC and/or virtually via Conference Call #1-929-205-6099; Access Code: 912 096 416. Exceptions: Summer Schedule - 3rd Tues. of June, July, and August; December meetings on the 1st and 3rd Tues. Dates and locations subject to change.

City of Charleston Technical Review Committee meets every Thurs. at 9 a.m.via Zoom.

City of Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals – Site Design meets the 1st Wed. of each month at 5 p.m. via Zoom.

City of Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals – Zoning meets the 1st and 3rd Tues. of each month at 5:15 p.m., except for January and July when no meeting is held on the 1st Tues.

City of Charleston Design Review Board meets the 1st and 3rd Mon. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

City of Charleston Planning Commission meets the 3rd Wed. of every month at 5 p.m.

City of Charleston Board of Architectural Review – Large projects meets the 2nd and 4th Wed. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

City of Charleston Board of Architectural Review – Small projects meets the 2nd and 4th Thurs. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

Credit One Stadium 1 of 3 pop-up skating rinks in Charleston area without real ice

DANIEL ISLAND — As skates shuffled across the white surface temporarily covering the clay tennis court below, no ice spritzed from the blades and no grooves were left behind.Children and adults alike shimmied from foot to foot as they looped the makeshift concourse. While it wasn’t the most polished performance to watch from the sidelines, on a 75-degree day in Charleston, those skaters wouldn’t have had the same opportunity if they had been on real ice.The new outdoor ice skating rink at ...

DANIEL ISLAND — As skates shuffled across the white surface temporarily covering the clay tennis court below, no ice spritzed from the blades and no grooves were left behind.

Children and adults alike shimmied from foot to foot as they looped the makeshift concourse. While it wasn’t the most polished performance to watch from the sidelines, on a 75-degree day in Charleston, those skaters wouldn’t have had the same opportunity if they had been on real ice.

The new outdoor ice skating rink at Credit One Stadium is one of three to pop up in the Charleston area this season that’s made of synthetic ice, a high-density polymer or polyethylene plastic.

There’s also one at the Charleston Harbor Resort and Marina in Mount Pleasant that will be open Thursdays through Sundays through Feb. 5 and another promised for Folly Beach across from Bert’s Market from Dec. 23 to 25.

More than 5,000 advance online tickets to the Credit One rink were purchased in just a few days; guests are still invited to come observe, but skating spots are booked.

As for the “ice,” polymer is cheaper to use and doesn’t require the same sort of cooling system that might falter in the Lowcountry’s unpredictable December temperatures.

The oval rink at Credit One, which takes up most of the flat standing-room surface at the Daniel Island concert venue, was built in three days by the in-house crew, a group that had never attempted the feat before.

That included seven employees installing 255 synthetic panels that each weigh 86 pounds for eight hours each day. After the 3-by-6-foot panels were joined together, dasher walls were added to line the rink’s edges. Then Christmas trees, fire pits for roasting s’mores and other festive touches were incorporated.

There’s a Santa’s Sweet Shoppe snack bar on the concourse for purchasing holiday treats, along with one up above with a great view of the rink serving up coffee and hot chocolate, plain or spiked with peppermint schnapps or Baileys Irish Cream. There’s a little something for the whole family, in other words.

For Chris and Emily Mingledorff, s’mores were a must after an hour of laps around the rink with kids Molly and George on Dec. 3. Their eldest daughter in high school was coming later that night with friends.

The family has lived on Daniel Island for the past 11 years and was quite excited to skate in their own backyard. They’ve been to the Rockefeller Center and Bryant Park skate rinks in New York City, along with ski resorts out west, but Emily Mingledorff said there’s nothing like skating at home.

“All us Daniel Island residents are really thankful to have these new opportunities for our family and friends,” Mingledorff said. “The tennis and concerts have been wonderful, but this is something extra special.”

The first-ever ice-skating rink at the venue was an idea encouraged by the Daniel Island Community Fund, including event planner Maureen Hickey.

“We had a conversation that instead of having our annual tree lighting across the street and then doing something festive here, why don’t we just combine the two?” said Hickey.

This year’s Daniel Island tree lighting was held inside the stadium, with a Santa Claus firetruck procession winding from the courtyard into the stands. The ice-skating rink opened the same night. As the lights turned on and glimmered throughout the amphitheater, including from a dazzling disco ball, fake snowflakes fluttered in a magical display.

“I just felt like, ‘Pinch me, is this Charleston?’” Hickey said.

Ashley Ridge High School teacher Kim Emery wasn’t there for opening night, but she was the day after as those who signed up online for a slot lined up for their skates. Her volunteer position with United Sports Foundation, an organization that raises money for students to play sports, included selecting the right size for skaters and sharpening the blades, a necessity especially for the synthetic ice.

Emery, who’s been at the Summerville school for 14 years, said she wouldn’t be surprised if some of her students showed up. She herself wasn’t planning to skate.

“I’m scared of it,” she said with a laugh. “I haven’t put on ice skates in 20 years. Now I might twist an ankle.”

While the fake ice doesn’t quite allow the same sort of glide that real ice might, it’s less painful to fall on, feeling more like a linoleum kitchen floor than a rock-hard veneer. From an observer’s perspective, it also seems to be steadier, with less full-on tumbles.

“I was watching from the sidelines to see how it worked, and by the end of the session, everyone was getting the hang of it,” Hickey said. “I think for the little children, especially, it’s probably easier. You didn’t see a lot of Bambi on the ice.”

Retired firefighter and paramedic Steven Rosone brought his experienced ice-skating family, originally from New Jersey and currently residing in Mount Pleasant, out to the rink on opening day.

His daughter Samantha, 11, who takes figure skating lessons at the Carolina Ice Palace, Charleston’s indoor ice rink, admitted that the fake ice was not quite like the actual stuff. Son Tyler, 13, agreed he was a bit disappointed.

“It’s easy to stay up, but not easy to skate,” offered Samantha between shuffles.

The point was for a festive outing, said Rosone, who was also planning to take his wife, Stacey, and kids to the James Island Festival of Lights and Isle of Palms Christmas Festival, along with some upcoming pop-up holiday markets.

“I grew up with skating and snow every year, but I’ll trade it in for this weather,” Rosone said with a laugh, noting that Samantha was donning a swimsuit and shorts in December.

Bob Moran, president of Charleston Tennis, said it’s been heartwarming to see locals engage in a new holiday tradition on the island.

“Our goal was to create a thoughtful, unique experience that brings joy,” Moran said. “Seeing how quickly the community responded to this and watching them enjoy the stadium in this way has been incredible for my team and I.”

In addition to the three outdoor rinks popping up in the Lowcountry, the Carolina Ice Palace is hosting skaters for the month of December at its “Winter Wonderland” holiday-decorated indoor rink.

Give wisely to charities this holiday season; consider ‘Angels’ of 2022

Each year South Carolina Secretary of State Mark Hammond announces the Angels organizations honored for demonstrating good stewardship of charitable resources in South Carolina.The Angels of 2022 recognized, with the percentage of their expenditures that went toward their program services, are listed at the end of this article.The Angels were selected by review of financial reports submitted annually to the Secretary of State’s Office, as well as by nominations from the public. To be selected as an Angel, the charity must...

Each year South Carolina Secretary of State Mark Hammond announces the Angels organizations honored for demonstrating good stewardship of charitable resources in South Carolina.

The Angels of 2022 recognized, with the percentage of their expenditures that went toward their program services, are listed at the end of this article.

The Angels were selected by review of financial reports submitted annually to the Secretary of State’s Office, as well as by nominations from the public. To be selected as an Angel, the charity must have devoted 80% or more of its total expenditures to charitable programs; must have been in existence for three or more years; must make good use of volunteer services; must receive minimal funding from grants; must have a significant presence in South Carolina; and must be in compliance with the South Carolina Solicitation of Charitable Funds Act. Each year the Secretary of State’s Office attempts to showcase Angels with diverse missions from several areas around the state.

“Charities do so much for our communities, and I am proud to recognize these wonderful organizations that have made a difference in the lives of so many South Carolinians,” Hammond said.

Prior to recognizing the 2022 Angels, Secretary Hammond released the 2021-22 Wise Giving Report as part of International Charity Fraud Awareness Week in October. This report provides wise giving tips for donors and includes data from professional solicitor contracts and joint financial reports filed with the Secretary of State’s Office. Furthermore, the Wise Giving Report includes the 2022 Give Smart Watch List, which names 10 charities registered to solicit in South Carolina that have reported spending less than 40% of their expenses on charitable programs.

“South Carolina is one of the most generous states in the nation, and this year’s Angels exemplify how this generosity can transform the lives of others,” Hammond said. “As we enter the holiday season, I encourage everyone to give back to their communities in any way that they can, whether it be through making a donation or volunteering their services. As always, remember to give from the heart, but please give smart.”

Charitable donors may research charities registered in South Carolina by visiting the Secretary of State’s website at sos.sc.gov. To look up a charitable organization, select the Charities Search feature to learn a charity’s total revenue, program expenses, total expenses, net assets, and fundraiser costs, as well as the percentage of total expenses that the charity has spent on program services. You can also call the Division of Public Charities at 1-888-CHARITI (242-7484) or send an email to charities@sos.sc.gov for more information.

If you have concerns about a charitable organization, professional fundraiser, or raffle, you can file a confidential complaint with the Secretary of State’s Office by using the online Charitable Solicitation Complaint Form.

Angel Charities 2022

(Listed in alphabetical order with % of expenditures toward program services)

? Cancer Association of Spartanburg & Cherokee Counties, Inc., Spartanburg - 93.2%

? Child Advocacy Center of Aiken County, Aiken - 85.2%

? Defenders For Children, Greenville - 91%

? Mercy Medicine Free Clinic, Florence - 95.6%

? Operation Home, Inc., North Charleston - 91.6%

? Programs for Exceptional People Inc., Bluffton - 91.1%

? Restore Mobility for the Blind, Lake Wylie - 94.1%

? Sharing God’s Love, Inc., Irmo - 92.3%

? The Dream Center of Pickens County, Easley - 95%

? The Village Group, Georgetown - 98.9%

Cold snap bursts water pipes across the Lowcountry creating ‘major crisis’ in leaks and flow

Record cold temperatures have burst so many pipes that the Charleston Water System has seen its water flow double, leaving the utility on the verge of asking customers to boil their water.“We’ve seen thousands upon thousands of leaks in customers homes and in their irrigation systems, so we’ve been dying a death of a thousand cuts,” Mike Saia, spokesman for Charleston Water System, said on Dec. 26 in reference to the gallons of spillage pouring out of torn-open pipe sections.“We’re in a major...

Record cold temperatures have burst so many pipes that the Charleston Water System has seen its water flow double, leaving the utility on the verge of asking customers to boil their water.

“We’ve seen thousands upon thousands of leaks in customers homes and in their irrigation systems, so we’ve been dying a death of a thousand cuts,” Mike Saia, spokesman for Charleston Water System, said on Dec. 26 in reference to the gallons of spillage pouring out of torn-open pipe sections.

“We’re in a major crisis that can only end if customers take action to stop leaks,” he said.

The Charleston Water System remains safe but the utility is asking customers to leave their faucets dripping overnight to prevent freezing, disconnect their irrigation systems from the water supply and check for leaks.

Teams are available to help shut off water valves at 843-727-6800, but Saia said wait times for an answer were averaging 30 minutes because of the volume of calls. The calls and responses so far have measured into the hundreds.

Downtown Charleston reached 20 degrees Saturday, breaking a record for Christmas Eve chill set in 1989. The overnight cold is expected to last a few more days, meaning more leak conditions are possible for local customers.

Other areas were in more distress. The town of Ridgeville in Dorchester County issued a precautionary Boil Water Alert until Thursday afternoon because of burst pipes.

Some relief from the cold temperatures should be ahead as overnight lows are expected to rise above freezing in the coming days, with daytime temperatures hovering in the 60s by the weekend.

Charleston Water System has been able to treat enough water to avoid a boil order so far, but it’s dangerously close. The system can treat about 105 million gallons per day. With the leaks, it has been treating more than 100 million gallons a day for the past few days.

Workers who see water leaking from a house are now stopping to turn off the water even if no one is at the home, Saia said. Many vacation rentals or other short-term rental homes may be vacant with no one there to notice a leak, he said.

The projected warmer weather will increase the likelihood of a water main break, Saia said, which could be enough to cause an emergency if the home leaks aren’t stopped.

“We need our customers to do everything in their power to identify these leaks and help us stop them before temperatures rise and the second challenge rears its head,” Saia said.

Area plumbers have had no shortage of work orders. By noon on Dec. 26, the fractured 43-foot pipe underneath a house on Daniel Island was plumber Perry Pickering’s seventh call of the day. He worked from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Christmas Day responding to more than two dozen calls on Christmas Eve.

He’s seen frozen and burst pipes all over the region.

“It’s the worst freeze damage that I’ve seen in my lifetime,” said Pickering, 54-year-old owner of Picks Plumbing in Charleston. “Normally the people closer to the coast like Daniel Island and Mount Pleasant don’t have to worry about it because of the temperatures being a little bit higher coming off of the ocean. But this year it it caught everybody.”

Pickering said the vast majority of broken lines he has seen are on the outside of homes and have no insulation.

Offices at some local water companies were closed Dec. 26. An automated message at Mount Pleasant Waterworks said the utility had lowered water pressure across the system to try to help deal with freezing temperatures.

Pickering’s advice to homeowners was similar to the alert the Charleston Water System sent out over the weekend.

“Moving water does not freeze: leave the lines dripping,” Pickering said. “You need to leave the cold water as well as the hot water dripping because the hot water line, except for the water heater, after a few minutes it gets cold as well and is susceptible to freezing.”

BE, Philip Simmons produce four more next-level student-athletes

South Carolina is such a fertile area for high school athletics that the recruiting season in the Palmetto State is year-round. Coaches call, text, send mail and go door-to-door searching for student-athletes who fill their program’s unique needs, while hoping the academic side of college life will entice them to matriculate to their town.The Daniel Island area was a recent hot spot as four student-athletes, including three from Bishop England, announced their commitments. They include: baseball player Asher Western, who is head...

South Carolina is such a fertile area for high school athletics that the recruiting season in the Palmetto State is year-round. Coaches call, text, send mail and go door-to-door searching for student-athletes who fill their program’s unique needs, while hoping the academic side of college life will entice them to matriculate to their town.

The Daniel Island area was a recent hot spot as four student-athletes, including three from Bishop England, announced their commitments. They include: baseball player Asher Western, who is headed to USC-Beaufort; track and field performer Maggie Long, who is headed to Anderson University and football player Charlie Ranney, who is slated to go to Bates College.

The lone student-athlete from Philip Simmons is soccer standout Claire Esse, who will attend UNC Greensboro.

Esse is the epitome of a student-athlete with an even more impressive academic record. She has a4.85 GPA on a weighted scale and will study business as her major and interior architecture as her minor. She earned an UNCG Bryan School of Business merit scholarship, with only 25 of 600 applicants receiving the honor.

“Throughout both my club and high school seasons, I balanced both my determination for the sport and my focus on academics, maintaining straight A’s,” Esse wrote on her recruiting profile.

“Being able to manage my many interests and schoolwork has shown me that I am capable of reaching my goals… I have and always will aim to be the hardest worker on the field and push myself to the best of my abilities.”

While the Bishop baseball team had an atypical year, failing to advance out of the Class AAA District 6 playoffs, Western was a powerful force with a .377 batting average. He connected for six doubles and two home runs while driving in 15 runs. The 6-2, 190-pound

outfielder showed good speed with five stolen bases. He played travel ball for the Canes South team.

Before the 2022 season, coach Mike Darnell told Western he should be contributing more and playing a bigger role.

“He has been a pleasant surprise and has really blossomed as a leader,” Darnell said. “It has been really great to watch him grow as a young man.”

Ranney is a senior at Bishop England and hasn’t stopped for rest since the 2022-23 academic year commenced. He will play football at the next level at Bates College, a private liberal arts school in Lewiston, Maine.

Ranney played safety for coach John Cantey’s squad and was a force with 112 tackles and seven interceptions. He also plays basketball.

Long, the Bishops’ track-and-field standout, is an impressive sprinter/jumper. At last May’s Class AAA state championships at Lower Richland High School, Long won a bronze medal by leaping 16 feet, 8 inches in the long jump while finishing 11th in the triple jump. She also was a member of the 4x100 relay team that finished in seventh.

This spring will mark her fourth year in coach Tony Colizzi’s program, which will compete at the Class AA level.

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