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If you're in need of a professional, fast, reliable company for kitchen cabinets, countertops, and remodels, look no further than Stone City Kitchen & Bath.

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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Daniel Island, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

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Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Daniel Island, SC

The Islander restaurant on Daniel Island is closing

The Islander restaurant on Daniel Island is closing later this month for renovations and will be reopened under a new concept, its owner announced Thursday,Aug. 31 will be the last day of food service, said Marty Wall, managing director of Holy City Hospitality.The Charleston-based company has operated the Fairchild Street restaurant since 2014, when it opened in the former Queen Anne’s Revenge space.The closing coincides with construction of a Hilton hotel that developer Mike Bennett, owner of Holy City, is buildi...

The Islander restaurant on Daniel Island is closing later this month for renovations and will be reopened under a new concept, its owner announced Thursday,

Aug. 31 will be the last day of food service, said Marty Wall, managing director of Holy City Hospitality.

The Charleston-based company has operated the Fairchild Street restaurant since 2014, when it opened in the former Queen Anne’s Revenge space.

The closing coincides with construction of a Hilton hotel that developer Mike Bennett, owner of Holy City, is building next door. The lodging will open in late 2018.

Holy City said it will renovate and redesign the Islander space for a new but undisclosed dining concept.

“We want to thank our hard-working staff, past and present, who created a memorable experience for guests over the past three years,” the company said.

Holy City’s other dining establishments include 39 Rue de Jean, Virginia’s on King and Victor Social Club, all on the peninsula.

NEW YORK — Most taxpayers are interested in filing their taxes directly to the IRS for free, a new report says, and that option will be tested next year.

The Internal Revenue Service has spent the past nine months studying whether U.S. taxpayers want to see a free, e-filing system run by the government — and is now preparing to launch a pilot program.

The prospect of a free, government-run, online system has been debated for a long time. Supporters argue that the option would make tax return services more equitable and accessible for taxpayers nationwide.

But there’s also been pushback from some big tax-prep companies.

Now, the IRS plans to launch a pilot program for the 2024 filing season to test a “direct file” system and help the federal government decide on whether to move forward with potentially implementing it in the future, IRS commissioner Danny Werfel and the Treasury Department official Laurel Blatchford confirmed on May 16.

There’s still limited details about the pilot as the agency determines the basic structure of the program, but Werfel said that members of the public will have the option to participate.

The IRS was tasked with looking into how to create a “direct file” system as part of the funding it received from the Inflation Reduction Act, Democrats’ flagship climate and health care measure that President Joe Biden signed last summer. It gave the IRS nine months and $15 million to report on how such a program would be implemented.

The IRS published a feasibility report Tuesday — which lays out taxpayer interest in direct file, how the system could work, its potential cost, operational challenges and more.

The report shows that the majority of surveyed taxpayers would be interested in using an IRS-provided tool to prepare and file their taxes electronically — and that the IRS is “technically capable of delivering direct file, but doing so would require additional resources and add complexity to IRS operations,” Werfel said.

The IRS’s existing free e-file option, available to lower income taxpayers who qualify, will remain in place, he added. Individuals of all income levels can also still submit their returns for free via the mail — although it can take months to process paper returns and taxpayers will still have to buy postage.

The new, direct e-file program being tested “could potentially save taxpayers billions of dollars annually,” said Blatchford, who noted that an individual taxpayer pays an average of $140 preparing a tax return each year.

The report’s initial cost analysis show that a pre-file option run by the IRS “could cost less than $10 per return to provide, and of course would be free to taxpayers — by comparison, simple electronic filing options currently available to taxpayers are around $40.”

The study estimates that annual costs of direct file may range, depending on the program’s usage and scope, from $64 million for 5 million users to $249 million for 25 million users.

“We believe today’s announcement is a significant step toward revolutionizing access to the tax system so that it is easier and more equitable. A free and simple direct file service will ensure that more families in America receive the tax benefits they are eligible for,” Amanda Renteria, CEO of civic tech nonprofit Code for America, said in a statement.

While supporters applauded the pilot program, critics have expressed skepticism about the IRS taking on the dual roles of both tax collector and tax preparer, arguing that the new service could create a power imbalance between taxpayers and the government.

There’s also concern about historic racial disparities and bias seen in the IRS’s enforcement of tax laws. In a Monday letter to the U.S. Senate, Werfel confirmed the IRS found that Black taxpayers may be audited at higher rates.

Big tax preparation companies also have millions of dollars to lose if the program comes to fruition. Last year, more than 60 million taxpayers were serviced between Intuit, the parent company of TurboTax, and H&R Block.

Neither H&R Block nor Intuit were immediately available to comment on Tuesday.

An Associated Press analysis shows that Intuit, H&R Block, and other private companies and advocacy groups for large tax preparation businesses, as well as proponents in favor of electronic free file, have reported spending $39.3 million since 2006 to lobby on “free-file” and other matters. Federal law doesn’t require domestic lobbyists to itemize expenses by specific issue, so the sums are not limited to free-file.

Werfel on Tuesday acknowledged concerns surrounding a possible direct file system, notably operational challenges, but maintained taxpayers should chose the filing option that works best for them and that “the IRS cannot run the tax system alone.”

“We rely on an extensive network of partners across tax professional groups, the software communities, the payroll community and countless dedicated organizations that work directly with taxpayers,” Werfel said. “This report changes none of that.”

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Charleston hosting third composting workshop at Daniel Island Recreation Complex

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — The city of Charleston and regional partners are hosting their third free workshop for residents to learn about composting today, March 4.The March 4 workshop will be at the Daniel Island Recreation Facility, 160 Fairbanks Drive, from 11 a.m. to noon, according to a press release.The press release says the next two workshops will be on March 20 at the James Island Recreation Complex, 1088 Quail Drive, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on April19 at the Charleston Gaillard Center, 2 George Street, a...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — The city of Charleston and regional partners are hosting their third free workshop for residents to learn about composting today, March 4.

The March 4 workshop will be at the Daniel Island Recreation Facility, 160 Fairbanks Drive, from 11 a.m. to noon, according to a press release.

The press release says the next two workshops will be on March 20 at the James Island Recreation Complex, 1088 Quail Drive, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on April19 at the Charleston Gaillard Center, 2 George Street, and via Zoom from noon to 1 p.m.

Read more: SMC celebrating new surgical services project, hosting robotic showcase

According to the press release, the workshops are designed to provide tools and resources to help residents get started composting, including information on the new food scrap drop-off program and composting at home. Residents are invited to join a workshop of their choice and pick up a free, reusable kitchen compost caddy.

The press release says thanks to a regional partnership with Charleston, Charleston County and Folly Beach, multiple drop sites are available for residents in the Charleston region to drop off food scraps at no charge. Three new sites will open on March 1. The food scraps are then sent to the Bees Ferry Compost Facility, instead of the landfill, to be recycled into compost.

Residents interested in dropping off food scraps must sign up in order to learn how the program works and what items are accepted, according to the press release. The sign up form is also available at www.charleston-sc.gov/compost

Read more: CCSD hosts 4th annual Battle of the Books

Once registered, the press release says food scraps can be dropped off at any of the following sites listed below:

Corinne Jones Park at 36 Marlow Drive (Peninsula)

Elliotborough Park at 134 Line Street (Peninsula), opening March 1

Medway Park at 2101 Medway Road (James Island)

James Island Recreation Complex at 1088 Quail Drive (James Island), opening March 1

Bees Ferry Landfill at 1344 Bees Ferry Road (West Ashley)

Ackerman Park at 55 Sycamore Avenue (West Ashley)

Folly Beach City Hall at 55 Center Street (Folly Beach)

Governors Park at 165 Fairbanks Oak Alley (Daniel Island), opening March 1

Read more: Palmetto Goodwill to host 6th annual Hippie Dash 5K fundraiser at James Island County Park

For more information about each drop site, including hours open and directions to access the site, the press release says to go to www.charleston-sc.gov/compost

Behind the Badge: SRO steps up, helps teach Spanish classes at Daniel Island School

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Here on News 4, we're taking you Behind the Badge introducing you to men and women of the Lowcountry who keep us safe.Today, you'll meet a school resource officer who wears multiple hats. From protector to teacher, he says every job he takes on at school helps him connect with hundreds, if not thousands, of students.Officer Al Cammarata starts some of his days at the Daniel Island School teaching Spanish. His most recent lesson: how to prepare guacamole, and learning the vocabulary that comes wit...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Here on News 4, we're taking you Behind the Badge introducing you to men and women of the Lowcountry who keep us safe.

Today, you'll meet a school resource officer who wears multiple hats. From protector to teacher, he says every job he takes on at school helps him connect with hundreds, if not thousands, of students.

Officer Al Cammarata starts some of his days at the Daniel Island School teaching Spanish. His most recent lesson: how to prepare guacamole, and learning the vocabulary that comes with it.

It's not what Officer Cammarata thought he’d be doing when he got into policing 30 years ago. When he made the switch from patrol to being an SRO, his job responsibilities changed.

RELATED: Berkeley County School District new-student registration to open Tuesday morning

“I’ve taught classes in the past from culinary arts to driver’s ed, freshman focus, bike safety,” he says. “Just wherever we can, dimension, groups, we do all kinds of things.”

He has a bachelor’s degree in Spanish, and put his degree to work in his travels to Central America.

WCIV

“I took anywhere between 14 or 16 or 18 classes over three years, including the summer. But going and studying and living in the culture is the only way to learn the language,” Cammarata says. “I got a good grammar base as a non-native speaker, and that was definitely the way to improve your skills.”

When a Spanish teacher at Daniel Island School left midway through the school year, Officer Cammarata stepped in.

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“The teacher that filled in was a retired teacher who was a full-time sub. She didn’t have any Spanish-speaking experience, so we just kind of teamed up,” says Cammarata. “She did the lesson plans and the videos, and I would come in and do basic grammar. I would come in maybe 20 or 30 minutes each day and help out with the lesson.”

It’s a routine that’s stuck. He helps out with some of the fifth and sixth grade Spanish classes in between his primary job of keeping everyone safe.

“You’re there every day, this is your responsibility, so you have to know the building, the community, the people, everything that’s going on,” he explains. “I’ve been here seven years. I have kids that are now in 7th grade that were in kindergarten when I started here.”

Cammarata says he also helps show students that officers are just like them.

“They just get to see you day after day, and know that you’re a regular person, and you’re just part of their regular day like a teacher. To me it's very rewarding. It's really the ultimate form of community policing. You’re dealing with the same kids, parents the same community year after year,” he says. “For me its really where I’m supposed to be.”

From ushering to ziptie-ing a broken sandal: Charleston Open volunteers love what they do

DANIEL ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — If you've been following the Credit One Charleston Open, you probably know all about the players on the court. But what about the people behind the scenes?Volunteer Coordinator Joe Cooper said they have nearly 450 volunteers for the week-long tournament.Read More: ...

DANIEL ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — If you've been following the Credit One Charleston Open, you probably know all about the players on the court. But what about the people behind the scenes?

Volunteer Coordinator Joe Cooper said they have nearly 450 volunteers for the week-long tournament.

Read More: Photographer who captured tennis player's engagement has been photographing her for years

On average, they get between 435 and 450 applications a year - some even take off work in order to help.

“It's a week I look forward to all year long," Cooper said.

The Credit One Charleston Open volunteers say helping has never been so much fun.

From ushering to ziptie-ing a broken sandal: Charleston Open volunteers love what they do. (WCIV)

“I still love the game and am still very involved in the game, so being out here is just an opportunity you can't pass up," volunteer Laney Lane said.

Day to day tasks vary as volunteers are placed in one of many groups

“The ushers have a really good time watching tennis and helping the patrons with anything they might need. Our court maintenance department really enjoys running the lines and getting the courts ready. We have people in the media center helping with media. We have player services- they escort the players to and from the courts," Cooper said.

And every once in awhile they take on a task they didn’t necessarily train for.

Read More: Monday coverage of the Credit One Charleston Open: An engagement & stories of growth

“We had a patron in box 109 and her sandal broke so we zip-tied her sandal back together and got her back up and running," Cooper said.

She said all volunteers must work together in order for things to run smoothly.

“We have department chairs and they run the entire department. So we have radios we communicate with each other. And everyone is just so friendly and so happy and so glad to be here. We just work together really well," Cooper said.

But at the end of the day, she hopes everyone leaves wanting to come back.

Read More: Credit One Charleston Open Coverage

“I hope everyone has a great time. Comes back next year to volunteer but even more importantly, I'd like them to tell their friends so their friends want to volunteer," she said.

“This is my seventh year doing this and I look forward to 17 more." Lane said.

If you get the chance to make it to this year’s Charleston Open, you can easily spot all of the volunteers in their yellow shirts.

To find out more about volunteering, visit the tournaments website.

Daniel Island poised to see new $20M-plus hotel with restaurant, cottages and event space

A $20-million-plus lodging with a restaurant, event space and guest cottages is being proposed for Daniel Island.The city of Charleston’s Design Review Board recently signed off on plans for a 38-unit hotel at 1995 Daniel Island Drive near the planned 320-unit Nowell Creek Village Apartments.The site is across from the former Blackbaud headquarters building, which is now a multitenant office structure called Marshside. The board suggested a few aesthetic ...

A $20-million-plus lodging with a restaurant, event space and guest cottages is being proposed for Daniel Island.

The city of Charleston’s Design Review Board recently signed off on plans for a 38-unit hotel at 1995 Daniel Island Drive near the planned 320-unit Nowell Creek Village Apartments.

The site is across from the former Blackbaud headquarters building, which is now a multitenant office structure called Marshside. The board suggested a few aesthetic revisions, but otherwise unanimously voted for the hotel project.

A small office structure currently occupies the site and can be moved to make way for the new project once it clears other approvals from the city.

JT Industries LLC, an affiliate of developer King and Society Real Estate of Charleston, bought the 1.5-acre parcel near Beresford Creek in 2019 for $1.25 million, according to Berkeley County land records.

“We have a unique and interesting waterfront property on Daniel Island and have been working to find the best use and need for this location,” said King and Society founder and CEO Troy Barber.

He estimated construction will take about 14 months after permits and other approvals are received and hopes the project will be completed in 2024.

Barber said a firm price had not been set on the hotel, but he believes the project will be more than $20 million.

The main 11,200-square-foot building will house guest rooms, restaurant and event space in three floors over parking. The proposal includes four guest houses of 8,500 square feet each, two 866-square-foot cottages, two 592-square-foot cabanas and 50 parking spaces.

The site plan shows the venue as a likely wedding venue, with separate suites for the bride and groom, a ballroom and an outdoor ceremony site overlooking Beresford Creek. Barber said it could also be used for corporate functions.

King and Society will be the developer and handle construction as well, Barber said.

Top sellers

At the mid-year point, South Carolina is home to three of the top-selling 50 master-planned communities in the U.S., even as sales slow from last year.

RCLCO Real Estate Consulting ranked Cane Bay Plantation in Berkeley County at No. 5 with 525 sales during the first six months of 2022. That’s down 9 percent from last year’s midpoint.

Nexton, also in Berkeley, came in at No. 22 with 308 sales, down 5 percent from the first six months of last year.

Latitude Margaritaville in Hardeeville near Hilton Head Island ranked No. 39 with 234 sales, down 29 percent from last year from January through June.

The top-selling, master-planned community continues to be The Villages, between Ocala and Orlando, Fla. It had about 1,500 sales, down 25 percent from last year at the midpoint.

Almost all of the top 50 are in the southern tier of states. Texas posted the most with 20, Florida landed 15, Nevada had four, California and Arizona saw three each, and Utah and Washington state notched one each.

Total new home sales among the 50 top-selling master-planned communities declined by 18 percent in the first half of 2022 compared to the same time period last year, according to RCLCO.

“Supply chain issues and inadequate new home inventory have continued to pose problems for developers, as price increases and interest rate hikes have begun to impact traffic from potential buyers in recent months,” RCLCO said in its mid-year report.

Nationally, the average price among all new single-family homes is up 15 percent since mid-2021.

“The results of this updated mid-year report confirm that supply chain disruptions continue to have an impact on the ability of master-planned communities to meet new home demand, though climbing interest rates and price appreciation have begun to have an impact on that demand, at least in the near-term,” said RCLCO principal Karl Pischke.

“However, it is important not to overreact to the slowing of sales seen over the last year, as these are still short-term trends,” he said.

“The long-term future of the for-sale housing industry, as evidenced by favorable demographic tailwinds, is strong,” Pischke said. “And the future of master-planned communities, particularly in their ability to capture an outsized share of buyer demand during uncertain or difficult economic times, provides another reason for optimism.”

The Charleston-area industrial real estate market proved resilient in the first quarter despite rising interest rates and a cooling economy, with tenants absorbing 2.2 million square feet, according to a new report.

All told, according to Colliers, 3.7 million square feet of new space came online in the first three months of the year. Vacancy rates ticked up as well, but they remained near historic lows at 3.74 percent despite all the new construction.

“Since the beginning of 2021, the market has absorbed an average of 1.6 million square feet per quarter,” the commercial real estate firm said in its analysis. “This was largely driven by warehousing to support the advanced manufacturing sector, particularly internal combustion and electric vehicle manufacturing, and expansion of third-party logistics activity.”

Over the coming months, those business sectors will continue to drive demand for additional real estate, according to the report. About 11.8 million square feet of industrial space is under construction in the three-county region.

The Port of Charleston is still the main driver, even though cargo levels have fallen in recent months as post-pandemic consumers spend more money on services and experiences than on imported goods. Inflation has also tamed what had been a frenetic spending spree last year on items like furniture and electronics.

A plan by ZEB Metals to build an aluminum recycling plant on 32 acres along U.S. Highway 52 in the Goose Creek area was the largest industrial announcement dollar-wise during the quarter, Colliers said. The $80 million project is expected to create 28 jobs.

Second to that project was a $49.9 million cold-storage warehouse that Charleston-based FlexCold plans to build along Patriot Boulevard in Dorchester County. The 151,600-square-foot building on roughly 51 acres is expected to create 59 jobs.

A separate report by Avison Young shows average annual base rents for Charleston-area industrial properties hit $8.89 per square foot in the first quarter and are expected to continue rising on the back of strong demand.

“As larger tenants relocate to the Charleston market, demand has increased for industrial space,” the firm’s local office said. “The projected average building size for deliveries in 2023 is 346,000 square feet. Based on construction activity, this number is expected to rise to 540,000 square feet in 2024.”

The Palmetto Commerce Park area in North Charleston and the Summerville region along Interstate 26 continue to be the hottest spots for industrial construction, with a combined 42.7 million square feet of space — nearly two-thirds of the market’s total.

Up a notch

An economic development trade publication reports South Carolina is the nation’s seventh-best state for attracting industrial investment.

The ranking is included in Site Selection’s annual Prosperity Cup list, which measures the effectiveness of each state’s economic development efforts.

The Palmetto State moved up one spot in the magazine’s 2023 rankings. Neighboring states Georgia and North Carolina placed first and second, respectively.

A focus on electric vehicles and the batteries that power them helped the S.C. Department of Commerce recruit 120 businesses and expansions representing investments topping $10.27 billion in 2022 — a record year for economic development in South Carolina and an 80 percent increase over the previous mark set in 2021.

The new deals promise to create 14,083 jobs over time, with most of the activity centered around plants in the Charleston region and the Upstate.

Bottled up

South Atlantic Canners is spending $28.7 million on a multiyear expansion at its Lee County site that will create 15 jobs over the next five years.

The company is managed by Coca-Cola Consolidated Inc., the largest independent Coca-Cola bottler in the United States with production of more than 300 beverage brands and distribution to 14 states and Washington, D.C.

South Atlantic Canners plans to renovate its existing Bishopville facility and add new, state-of-the-art equipment. The expansion is expected to be completed by the end of 2027.

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