843-764-3333
7629 Sandlapper Parkway N. Charleston, SC 29420

kitchen countertopsIn Awendaw, SC

Let's Talk!

We offer a wide selection of stones and materials for your next kitchen renovation project:

Kitchen Remodeling Awendaw, SC

Granite

 Bathroom Renovation Awendaw, SC

Marble

 Flooring Awendaw, SC

Quartzite

 Hardwood Flooring Awendaw, SC

Recycle Glass

 Home Renovations Awendaw, SC

Quartz

If you're in need of a professional, fast, reliable company for kitchen cabinets, countertops, and remodels, look no further than Stone City Kitchen & Bath.

RM

What Clients Say About Us

Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Stone City Kitchen & Bath?

Heading Tag

When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Awendaw, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Stone City KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Stone City Difference

Heading Tag

Here at Stone City Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-764-3333

Free Consultation

Latest News in Awendaw, SC

Prayers for Howie: Local volunteer rescues injured owl from busy Bluffton highway

The injured owl laid against the concrete roadside barrier, surrounded by the roar of Saturday morning traffic on Bluffton Parkway.Joshua Vermilyea, a local avian expert and longtime volunteer bird rescuer, was quick to help. After getting the call from a concerned community member, he and the injured owl — now known affectionately as “Howie” — were on the road to a veterinarian. Howie rode in a covered, blanket-filled pet carrier.Howie arrived at Awendaw’s ...

The injured owl laid against the concrete roadside barrier, surrounded by the roar of Saturday morning traffic on Bluffton Parkway.

Joshua Vermilyea, a local avian expert and longtime volunteer bird rescuer, was quick to help. After getting the call from a concerned community member, he and the injured owl — now known affectionately as “Howie” — were on the road to a veterinarian. Howie rode in a covered, blanket-filled pet carrier.

Howie arrived at Awendaw’s Avian Conservation Center, about 2 1/2 hours up the coast, where his rehabilitation treatment began. The owl was severely dehydrated and has a small hairline fracture in his right wing, which prevented him from flying. Staff believe he may have been hit by a car.

As of Tuesday, conservation center staff said Howie was refusing to eat — but Vermilyea hopes his appetite will return as his stress levels decrease.

“That little bird has gone through a lot,” he said. “It might just be the commotion that’s going on.”

Howie is a barred owl, one of the most common species in South Carolina. Found year-round in dense forests near water and swamplands, the birds’ distinct call is thought to sound like human speech: “Who cooks for you?

Veterinarians in Awendaw aren’t yet sure whether Howie needs surgery. As time passes, experts will monitor his health and flying patterns to determine when he’s ready to return to the wild.

If that happens, Vermilyea said he’ll do the honor of releasing Howie back in Bluffton, where the bird will be in familiar territory.

For Vermilyea, Howie’s story is a prime example of the tension between human life and animal ecosystems in the Lowcountry.

“You’re not going to stop human expansion, it’s never going to end,” Vermilyea said. “But we have to have a balanced ecosystem. There’s no way that any of us are ever going to survive if our ecosystem fails.”

Although the Avian Conservation Center should always be the first point of contact for injured birds, a number of skilled rehabbers are available across the Lowcountry to assist in the handling and transportation of injured animals.

Vermilyea suggests people call someone who is trained to handle wildlife and keep an eye on the injured critter until help arrives.

New Awendaw middle and high school could be partially magnet

A potential new middle and high school in Awendaw has a chance to be a partial magnet school, and students from multiple parts of the district can be pulled toAWENDAW, S.C. (WCSC) - A potential new middle and high school in Awendaw has a chance to be a partial magnet school, and students from multiple parts of the district can be pulled to take part in a specialized curriculum.Charleston County School District Board Members and the people of Mount Pleasant got to hear new details about the potential schools on Wednesday. Distri...

A potential new middle and high school in Awendaw has a chance to be a partial magnet school, and students from multiple parts of the district can be pulled to

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCSC) - A potential new middle and high school in Awendaw has a chance to be a partial magnet school, and students from multiple parts of the district can be pulled to take part in a specialized curriculum.

Charleston County School District Board Members and the people of Mount Pleasant got to hear new details about the potential schools on Wednesday. District officials told people at the meeting, held at Laing Middle School, that a lot of the plans right now are just ideas with no specific timeline.

This new middle and high school would be located on 107 acres at Highway 17 and Jenkins Hill Road. As part of this plan, district staff presented concept maps with multiple options for rezoning.

Jeff Borowy, the Chief Operating Officer for the district, says this plan will be a challenge.

“Most of the times we build a school, we just build a specific zone of attendance for that school, but in this case, we want to have a number of students to offer the right programs for those students,” Borowy said. “So, we have to look out of the box and look for something different beyond the zone.”

District staff says one of the main challenges is making sure that each school holds a maximum of 500 students. This would pull in kids from D1, the Awendaw-McClellanville area, and some from D2 in the northern Mount Pleasant area.

Staff also say they are continuing to research desirable education options for a partial magnet school to reach that target enrollment.

“It’s going to be very important to let’s build the school from up, but at the same time, let’s figure out what we’re going to be doing inside,” Thomas Colleton, D1 Constituent Board Chair, said. “The curriculum needs a lot.”

There is currently no timeline on construction for the schools because the district does not know if this magnet option will be included. The district says it is possible that the earliest we can start to see construction would be in four years.

Jonathan Mars, a parent of two children at Carolina Park Elementary, says this could be an option for his family when his kids get older.

“But it does sound like they’re going to have very specific programs at the school,” Mars said. “So, for example, if there’s a great art program and my daughter’s really into art that seems like a great option to have.”

As of now, this project is not fully funded and the district says they do not have a price estimate.

They say the next step is to charter a blue-ribbon committee in mid-October that will look at enrollment numbers and look at the best options to make this project successful.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

The 25th Annual Awendaw Blue Crab Festival in Charleston, SC

Good news, folks. After a two-year hiatus, the 25th Annual Awendaw Blue Crab Festival is returning this month.What to expectHosted by the Town of Awendaw on Sat., Aug. 27, this annual, family-friendly celebration is expected to bring in 3,000+ guests at its 300-acre event venue at the ...

Good news, folks. After a two-year hiatus, the 25th Annual Awendaw Blue Crab Festival is returning this month.

What to expect

Hosted by the Town of Awendaw on Sat., Aug. 27, this annual, family-friendly celebration is expected to bring in 3,000+ guests at its 300-acre event venue at the Town of Awendaw Municipal Park at 7997 Doar Rd.

Though some might assume the event will only offer blue crab, the festival is set to feature local food trucks, more than 75 art + retail vendors, beer and wine, live music by The Secretsaka one of Charleston’s longest-running funk shows — pontoon boat and hayrides, and a kids’ area.

And of course, there will be bushels of Lowcountry Blue Crabs served by the bucket in three flavors: Traditional, garlic, and cajun. Heads up: Crab buckets, beer and wine, hayrides, and boat rides will all require tickets.

General admission tickets are available for $10 if purchased in advance, or $15 at the door. If you’re looking to go all out this year, grab a VIP ticket for $125. A portion of the admission proceeds is set to be donated to “Build the Park” and other Awendaw charities.

But some (or all) of this may not be new information to you — seeing as how the annual celebration dates back to around 1994. So what’s the story?

How it began

In 1994, a group of Awendaw residents gathered to enjoy a few bushels of crab under an oak tree at Town Hall when the idea of a blue crab festival dawned on them.

What began as a small get-together became the annual Awendaw Blue Crab Festival that we know and love. It’s as simple as that.

Blue crabs in the Lowcountry

Though sometimes regarded as aggressive in nature, the blue crab is admired in the Lowcountry and said to support commercial fishery. The crustacean actually requires both inshore brackish and high salinity ocean waters to fulfill its life cycle — so it sounds like we’ve got the perfect environment.

Though there are other small swimming crabs in the family, this is the only crab with recreational and commercial importance in the state. The meat is used for various quintessential Lowcountry dishes — peep this story by Charleston Magazine featuring eight recipes from local restaurants.

We hope you head to this year’s Awendaw Blue Crab Festival with a new appreciation for the festival + the blue crabs significance in the Lowcountry. Let’s get to crab crackin’, Charleston. *

Large populations of mosquitos buzz up problems in Charleston County

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCIV) — Social media forums are buzzing in the Awendaw-McClellanville area.Mosquitos have people swatting from the second they step outside.It’s a problem that has crept into the freshly painted walls of Howard AME Church off of Rutledge Road.“Every day it’s getting worse and worse and worse right now,” said Vince Green, who has been remodeling the church for more than two months.Renovations are nearing completion, but an unwanted pest is now itching to cause trouble....

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCIV) — Social media forums are buzzing in the Awendaw-McClellanville area.

Mosquitos have people swatting from the second they step outside.

It’s a problem that has crept into the freshly painted walls of Howard AME Church off of Rutledge Road.

“Every day it’s getting worse and worse and worse right now,” said Vince Green, who has been remodeling the church for more than two months.

Renovations are nearing completion, but an unwanted pest is now itching to cause trouble.

“I’ve used up two cans of spray, Cutter, already,” Green said Monday afternoon. “So, it’s really, really bad.”

Green said the situation is bad on the outside, but worse on the inside. Mosquitos have planted themselves along windows and walls of the church. Green, like many others in the area, have noticed this problem grow substantially over the last week.

“We kind of figured it was coming,” said Brian Hayes, manager of Charleston County Mosquito Control.

Between Hurricane Ian and the Lowcountry’s recent temperatures, Hayes said it’s a timeline that makes sense.

“The cooler weather kind of prolongs how long the mosquitos are in the lava stage,” Hayes said. “But now that we’ve passed that 14-day period, all these mosquitos have hatched off.”

Despite the county’s varied attack from the air and ground, Hayes admitted there are certain challenges McClellanville presents.

“There are certain places that we’re restricted from spraying,” he said. “We’re restricted to only spraying on one product, which we’ve been using a long time. So, you know, we use the same product for a while, it’s not as effective.”

Despite limitations, Hayes insists the county is doing all it can, as quickly as possible.

“[We’ve received] well over 200 to 300 requests probably since Friday, so we’re well aware of the situation out there,” he said. “[We] completely understand things are really, really bad, and we’re doing all we can to assist the people up there.”

There is some good news, according to Hayes. Charleston County said it is unlikely this species of mosquito carries any diseases, and is hoping this week’s cooler temperatures will kill off large populations.

Awendaw leaders postpone vote on controversial proposed neighborhood

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCBD) – A small victory for many Awendaw residents after the town planning commission decided to postpone the vote on a controversial neighborhood proposal.Nearly 100 people packed into Town Hall for a public hearing Monday night. Many made their voices heard leading to eruptions of applause, laughter, and even booing.The packed public hearing stems from many Awendaw residents having concerns about the proposed White Tract Development.It’s slated to go between the intersection of Bulls Island a...

AWENDAW, S.C. (WCBD) – A small victory for many Awendaw residents after the town planning commission decided to postpone the vote on a controversial neighborhood proposal.

Nearly 100 people packed into Town Hall for a public hearing Monday night. Many made their voices heard leading to eruptions of applause, laughter, and even booing.

The packed public hearing stems from many Awendaw residents having concerns about the proposed White Tract Development.

It’s slated to go between the intersection of Bulls Island and Seewee Roads and Garris Landing on Bulls Island Road. Pulte Homes, one of the nation’s largest homebuilders, is the applicant.

More than 200 homes would be built on approximately 148 acres.

Many Awendaw residents say there’s a list of problems including heavily increased and potentially dangerous traffic on two-lane roads, water drainage issues, and a harmful impact to Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge which is nearby.

It’s described by the Fish and Wildlife Service as a rich mosaic of barrier islands with forest and ponds, vast salt marshes and intricate waterways. FWS says this diverse and dynamic system supports over 293 bird species and a myriad of other wildlife.

Additionally, it is a nesting site for loggerhead sea turtles and a fresh source for shrimp and oysters.

Susan Cox and other neighbors say building 200+ septic tanks on 148 acres so close to the refuge would be detrimental.

“We are not against development, we are against poorly planned development. And the density that is proposed for these housing developments here is more than the soil is likely to be able to handle. And it’s too close to the waterways to make any sense at all,” said Cox.

Awendaw does not have a sewer system, so all new development is built on septic tanks. Cox says while her neighborhood is also built on septic tanks, the homes are fewer and further between than the proposed development.

“We have 65 homes on 300 or 400 acres of land,” she said. “It’s our goal to make the town of Awendaw and the Department of Health and Environmental Control in South Carolina understand that septic tanks of this density and in this area are a very bad idea.”

The Town of Mt. Pleasant has been working to decrease the number of septic tanks in town for years due to sewage leaks into waterways such as Shem Creek. James Island residents have also reported problems that Charleston Waterkeeper says are likely due to leaking septic tanks.

That’s one prong of the argument Awendaw residents are making.

Cox and many others in Awendaw say the refuge should be protected and development should be done properly.

Now, the planning commission and town residents will have until the next planning commission meeting to gather information, make proposed alterations of the current proposal to the developer, and attempt to find a plan that pleases a majority of people.

This is a developing story. Count On 2 for updates on air and online.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.